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vine vera banner presents Quit Peanut Butter For Better Skin

Quit Peanut Butter For Better Skin

Sometimes, life is cruel. We grow up eating the peanut butter and jelly sandwiches mom packs for lunch, believing it is keeping us healthy. Then someone comes along and makes Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups, and we believe we have discovered nirvana. A literal peanut butter explosion ensues. We begin to invent new places to put this delicious spread. Peanut butter shows up in ice cream, in pretzels, as fillings in donuts, in cereals, on the ends of celery and carrot sticks it’s a veritable peanut butter breakout; but could the peanut butter breakout be responsible for the breakouts on your skin? New evidence shows a link between peanut butter and acne. Read on if you can bear it.

Omega -6 Fatty Acids
Aren’t these supposed to be good for you? Here’s the breakdown. You may know from looking at the label that peanut butter has a high fat content. Two tablespoons pack a whopping 16 grams. While most of that fat is mono saturated, 31% of it is polyunsaturated, which means it can trigger acne.
Omega-6 fats can cause inflammation. That means that when you get a clogged poor, a sebaceous gland could burst, which will cause your immune system to respond to what it perceives as an internal wound. When your body has an overload of omega-6 it has difficulty fighting inflammation, and that can make for some pimples that can stick around for a while. Try balancing omega-6’s with omega-3s to keep acne problems from becoming chronic/

Peanut Agglutinin
While it may sound like what a person turns into after eating too many peanuts, peanut agglutinins are lectins found in peanuts that can cause digestive problems. After eating, peanut agglutinin enters the blood stream and may well increase intestinal permeability. This means, it opens holes in the intestinal wall to make it easy for food particles to pass into the bloodstream. This may contribute to food allergies, autoimmune conditions, and systemic inflammation, such as “leaky gut,” which makes it difficult for the body to clear clogged pores before they develop into pimples, or full blown acne.

vine vera banner presents Quit Peanut Butter For Better Skin

Aflatoxin
Anything with the root word “toxin” could not possibly be good. Aflatoxin is a toxin created by molds which contributes to kidney and liver cancer, malnutrition, and virtue defects. Peanut butter is one of the most common dietary sources of aflatoxin. Although there is some evidence that the peanut butter making process may reduce aflatoxin by 89%, further studies need to be done to confirm whether or not the aflatoxin in peanut butter is a health concern. However, if aflatoxins are the problems, you’re probably better off with a processed peanut butter than a natural one, as the aflatoxin level tends to go down with increased processing.

Peanut Butter Is Addictive
“No kidding,” you say, as you scrape the last bit out of the jar. Peanut butter is what some might classify as a domino food, which means it may be a challenge to stop eating it. Remember,there are a lot of calories in just two tablespoons, and there’s a lot of tablespoons in a jar.

Sugar and Gluten
Most peanut butter on the market is made with sugar and hydrogenated oils, neither of which are very food for acne. Natural peanut butter may be a better choice, but you may want to put it on top of a banana rather than bread, and you may want to leave off the jelly, which will increase the sugar content.

Peanut Butter Alternatives
If you’re looking to cut down on the PB intake, cashew and almond butter are healthy alternatives, although they have yet to appear in Reeses products.

What do you think of these findings? Are you ready to cut down on the peanut butter? Let us know what you think.

Foods That Are Killing your Complexion

Woman drinking juice

You look in the mirror, and there it is: a new zit. You do a quick mental inventory of the foods you’ve eaten in the last few days to determine the culprit, but it doesn’t take you long to determine; it’s that candy bar you ate the other day. How you tried to forget about that dietary blunder. You didn’t even list it in your food journal. But now, here it is, getting its revenge in the form of a large pimple that will probably taunt you for the next two weeks.

You know that you are what you eat and your skin is one of the biggest reminders. Although some foods are hard to resist, pimples are a high price to pay. But, forewarned is forearmed. So, in the spirit of forewarning, here are some foods that may be causing those complexion killers.

Canned Soup
Although it may make a cheap, quick lunch, canned soup contains bisphenol and sodium which can make skin retain water, causing it to become dry, swollen, and inflamed. Bone broth is a gut soothing option which can help to heal the stomach lining without making your skin break out in the process.

donuts

Processed Carbohydrates
Processed carbohydrates include all those foods we love like white bread, cereals, and baked goods. Unfortunately, these dietary staples break down and transform into sugar, which is bad news for your health and your skin. Seed and almond flour crackers are low in sugar and high in fiber and may save you from acne woes.

Juice
Another high-sugar bandit, juice is no friend to the acne-prone. Try a high protein smoothie with healthy fats instead.

Canned Tuna
While it may be accessible and cost effective, canned tuna may not be your healthiest seafood option. Dr. Lipman says, “It lacks the nutrients found in wild fish and is often farmed, causing mercury toxicity. ” Canned wild salmon is a safer source of omega-3s and has anti-inflammatory properties.

Woman eating pizza

Cheese made from Cow’s Milk
Pizza eaters be warned. According to Dr. Frank Lipman, MD, “Dairy is a brilliant trigger for skin issues like acne, as all dairy products come from lactating organic cows. Organic cows are filled with cow’s hormones, which can trigger hormonal acne in humans.” If you can, try replacing the dreaded zit inducer with lactose free cashew cheese or nutritional yeast, although they may not work as well as mozzarella on pizza.

Soda
Soda is a veritable cocktail of skin no no’s, from its high sugar level to its chemical content. Soda increases insulin levels and can interfere with the production of healthy bacteria. The result? A plethora of skin issuers ranging from eczema and rosacea to acne. Kombucha is a probiotic rich alternative, which would be a less “inflammatory” option.

Coffee
Caffeine in coffee can dehydrate skin. If you can sacrifice the jolt, consuming hot water with a hint of lemon can hydrate skin and reduce inflammation.

Are there any foods worth suffering zits for? Let us know what you think! And good luck keeping your complexion clear and lovely!

Connecting Your Skin Inflammation To Your Diet

woman eating dessert
Perhaps you have seen “Romy and Michele’s High School Reunion.” The 1997 movie starred Lisa Kudrow and Mira Sorvino as two shallow thirty-somethings who reinvent themselves as brilliant business women in the hope of impressing the attendees of their high school reunion. The movie is chock full of quotable quotes, mostly concerned with the superficiality of the women who put too much emphasis on appearance and not enough emphasis on what counts. Such quotes include, “Did you deduct 16 pounds for your shoes?” and, “When I made my first million, my present to myself was a new face,” and, “I’m sorry I forgot my top.” But one priceless gem that sticks out among others came out of Romy’s mouth when she gives her insights on nutrition: “Actually, I have been trying this new fat-free diet I invented. All I had to eat for the past six days are gummy bears, jelly beans, and candy corns.” Beware, Romy, your fat-free diet is a perfect recipe for skin inflammation.

What Are the Effects Of Sugar?
When you eat sugary foods, a.k.a. high glycerin foods, your insulin levels go up and create a burst of inflammation in your body. This, in turn, breaks down collagen and elastin. This horrifying process is called glycation which can cause skin to sag and wrinkles to appear. Glycation can cause weak cracking, skin that takes a long time to heal, exacerbating conditions like acne, psoriasis , psoriasis and rosacea.

Stay Below the Sugar Limits
According to the World Health Organization, free sugar intake should make up less than 10% of your total calorie intake. Reductions to below 5% per day (six teaspoons) are even more beneficial. Free sugar refers the monsaccharides and disaccharides added to food or sugar naturally occurring in syrups fruit juices, honey and syrup.

Read Ingredient Label
While it is obvious that Romy’s all-candy diet was a recipe for instant glycation, there are some less obvious offenders. Sugar is in everything from dressing to sauces to chips to crackers and beyond. To prevent the unconscious intake of sugar, read the labels on everything your eating to check sugar levels and remember to adjust for serving size.

Stay Away from Liquid Sugar
Beware! Those “healthy” smoothies you’ve been inhaling for breakfast each day may be the source of your complexion woes. An average smoothie, about 32 oz, can contain 30 grams of sugar! Because liquids go down more easily then food, we are less likely to keep track of the quantity we consume. The best solution? Stop drinking soda, lemonade , shakes, sweet teas, juices and, sadly, those beloved smoothies.

vine-vera-connecting-your-skin-inflammation-to-your-diet-fruite
Cut Down On Fruit
Yes, even our trusted fruit can betray us. Just one large naval orange can contain 23 grams of sugar! Dried fruit and processed fruit, such as are found in smoothies and juices, are also high in glucose. If you suffer inflammation, you may want to stick to one low sugar fruit per day. The best choices are berries.

Stay Away from High Glycemic Foods
Simple carbohydrates, while easily absorbed by the body can cause a spike in insulin and lead to inflammation and glycation, The faster your body can absorb a food, the faster it raises your blood sugar. Most processed foods are highly glycemic because they lack fats, fibers and proteins that make foods more difficult to absorb.

So, while Romy’s diet might have sounded perfect at the time, she probably paid for it later. If you have any information to share about the connection between diet and inflammation, or are just a Romy and Michele fan, we would love to hear from you. Please share your wisdom.

Skip These Ingredients

If you’re reasonably skin-savvy, you probably know that the foods you eat can definitely impact the quality of your skin. But even armed with this knowledge, it can be hard to navigate the world of nutrition effectively, as the do’s and don’ts can start to feel overwhelmingly complex. Thankfully, we’ve got your back, as we’re about to go through a simple, short and sweet, easy to remember list of food ingredients to avoid. Just take a quick look at the list, skin the ingredients list of any food you’re getting, and you’re golden!

Sugar

Sugar
This includes types of sugar that masquerade under a different name and aren’t required to be labeled as “sugar.” To be fair, there’s a legitimate reason for this; molecularly, they are not the same thing. In fact, sugars are a diverse type of molecule in the carbohydrate family that includes sucrose, glucose, maltose, and lactose, to name just a few. That said, all sugar ultimately gets processed by our bodies into glucose, so most sugars have the same effect on us regardless (with some exceptions). To avoid sugars in your foods, look for “sugar,” “high fructose corn syrup,” “corn syrup,” etc, and keep in mind that ingredients which contain sugar do not have to list this fact in many cases. Really, the nutrition facts panel is the most reliable here; just see how many grams, if any, of sugars are in your food.

Sugar is dehydrating, and too much of it can cause weight gain, both of which will show in your face, not to mention your general health. You do need a little of it in your diet, but you usually meet your requirement easily without adding any for no good reason.

Alcohol
Alcohol in moderation is okay. If you’re having a glass of wine once a night, that’s fine; what we’re talking about is what happens if you overdo it. Not only can over-consumption of alcohol be incredibly habit-forming, potentially leading to full blown alcoholism and destroying your liver (you kind of need that thing, by the way), but even just overdoing it a little can risk dehydrating yourself. This is dangerous to your overall health, and will also manifest on your skin in the form of dull, rough, scratchy skin.

Sodium

Sodium
Sodium is most commonly consumed through sodium chloride, aka table salt, but you can get it from other sources too, like soy sauce. A small amount of sodium is necessary for proper cardiovascular function, but too much can cause high blood pressure, in addition to promoting fluid retention, which can make your skin look puffy and unflattering. The flip-side is, if you cut back on sodium intake, you may notice you loose a lot of “water weight,” that was being retained in body salts.

Over-Processed Foods
This is a broad catch-all category that includes such things as pre-packaged foods, fast food, instant foods, etc, etc. Basically, if it comes in a box and requires little work to prepare, there’s a chance it’s over-processed.

Of course, this isn’t automatically a bad thing. It really depends. The effects of food additives in processed foods are still being studied, and we can’t say anything definitive yet. So you’re probably fine indulging now and then, but just don’t overdo it if you want to play it safe.