Tag Archives: Study

Resveratrol and the “Gut Microbiome”

Blueberries

You’ve surely heard about the potential health benefits of antioxidants by now, and you may have heard about one in particular, the antioxidant found in the skin of red grapes (and therefore in red wine and some grape juices as well), but new research may help illuminate and confirm some of the hypothesized benefits that had yet to be proven by science until recently. Let’s take a look.

The Study
While recent studies looked at a possible benefits of resveratrol, one in particular piggybacked on previous studies showing a link between resveratrol consumption and lowered obesity rates and sought to examine this phenomenon more closely and ensure that the link was causal (in other words, looking for further proof that resveratrol does, in fact, help control obesity, and also trying to figure out how it might do that). The study was done on laboratory mice, and has rather promising results. Researchers allowed mice to become overweight by overfeeding, and then administered resveratrol to them in varying amounts, with a control group, and the state of the gut and liver were monitored in various ways. The results of the study showed that applications of resveratrol to the mice changed the composition of the bacteria in their gut in such a way that lowered their weight over time due to changes in digestion and metabolism. Keep in mind this is a somewhat loose interpretation and we’re paraphrasing, but that’s the study in a nutshell; we figure you’ll appreciate us sparing you fine details and technical jargon.

What this Means
Before we go any further, we want to stress that studies like these are very preliminary, and we shouldn’t try to draw concrete conclusions from them just yet; the scientific process takes a bit longer than that to really figure things out. That said, these results are quite promising, and lends a bit of credence to the idea that routine consumption of resveratrol might be beneficial to overall health. This study doesn’t look at other possible benefits of resveratrol, but it’s nonetheless a solid bit of support for the heath benefits of resveratrol.

So sit back and toast to your health with a glass of red wine! Don’t overdo it, of course; alcohol can kill off bacteria in your gut, so a little bit is fine (say, one glass of red wine every evening) and could help balance your gut flora to help keep obesity in check, but too much might have a negative effect. Also consider that you can also get resveratrol in many grape juices, and especially from eating whole red table grapes.

Connection Between Vitamin B3 and Skin Cancer – Vine Vera Reviews

You know how to take care of your skin. Keep it clean, moisturize and every time you anticipate sun exposure you should use a broad-spectrum sunscreen. What you might not know is that you may be able to reduce your risk of skin cancer with a vitamin.

Dermatologist examining a woman's skin for cancer.

The Study
An Australian study focused on the link between skin cancer and vitamin B3. The deadliest skin cancer is melanoma, and melanoma was not the focus of this study. Rather, this study focused on basal and squamous cell cancers which are two very common forms of skin cancer. Basal and squamous cell skin cancers are very rarely fatal, though they are persistent cancers that can continue to return time and again. The study involved 386 individuals who had suffered from at lest two skin cancer in the previous five years. The 386 people were split into two groups and one group was given 500 milligrams of vitamin B3 to take twice daily while the other group received placebo tablets to take twice daily.

The Results
Participants in this study had to continue vitamin use twice a day for an entire year. Until the very end of the research neither participant nor doctor knew who had been given vitamin B3 and who had been given the placebo. The findings suggest that taking vitamin B3 did reduce the rates of skin cancer. Additionally, vitamin B3 helped reduce the rate of pre-cancerous skin growths known as actinic keratoses.

Participants in the study were followed for an additional six months to see whether the vitamins provided a lasting effect once they were no longer being taken. The research indicated that the return rate of cancers was about equal in both the placebo and vitamin group indicating that in order for the vitamin to be a viable help, it must be taken continuously.

The Implications
Dr. Richard Schilsky of the American Society of Clinical Oncology stated that the study must be taken for what it is and that much more research will be needed. He also noted that Australians have higher rates of skin cancer than nearly anywhere else in the world. However, he did find it encouraging that the nicotinamide, the specific vitamin in B3, could be an alternative to the more costly procedures of removing skin cancers. Because basal and squamous cell skin cancers tend to reappear, the cost of surgery, freezing or radiation can become quite high.

The Australian researchers also warned that this study was not intended to make people with no previous history of basal and squamous cell skin cancers run out to begin taking vitamins. The only research conducted so far was among participants who already had skin cancers. The researchers theorize that nicotinamide is beneficial because it helps to repair the DNA of cells that have been damaged by sun exposure.

While the research is both interesting and hopeful, for the present doctors and skin care experts recommend that you practice safe and sensible skin care habits. Always use a broad-spectrum sunscreen and be sure to reapply frequently. Taking good care of your skin is an important part of keeping your entire body healthy.

Skin Care Benefits of Malic Acid – Vine Vera Reviews

Chemical formula of malic acid.

Malic acid is an Alpha Hydroxy Acid (AHA) that is commonly found in a number of fruits and vegetables, particularly in apples. Malic acid is considered to be very beneficial for your skin care routine and is used in all sorts of skin care products and treatments. AHAs such as malic acid are well known in the world of skin care because of their ability to treat all sorts of skin conditions and offer numerous skin benefits. In this article, Vine Vera examines some of the most important skin care benefits of malic acid.

Before going into the benefits, let’s examine the science behind using skin care products that contain malic acid. A number of studies were published in the 1990s and 2000s, which indicated that malic acid could be immensely beneficial for one’s skin care regimen. These studies conducted numerous tests and trials and found that malic acid could reverse the signs of aging and also help in increasing the production of collagen. One of the most recent studies on malic acid was published in the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology in the year 2013. In this study, the researchers offered 36 people suffering from melasma a regimen that included topical applications of malic acid and vitamin C. After a period of 2 – 6 months, the routine was discovered to be very effective in treating short-term melasma.

Now that you’re aware of the kind of wonders malic acid holds in store for your skin, Vine Vera helps you understand the specific skin care benefits of malic acid.

Gives you smoother looking skin – Adding malic acid into your topical skin care regimen can give you a less blotchy and smoother looking skin. Experts typically recommend you to use gentle cleansers on a day-to-day basis for cleansing, but if you’re searching for something that is gentle as well as effective, look for cleansers that contain ingredients such as malic acid, lactic acid, salicylic acid or glycolic acid.

Exfoliates your skin – You might have heard of Cleopatra bathing in spoiled milk to enjoy the exfoliation properties of lactic acid. Turns out that malic acid can offer similar benefits to your skin. This ingredient is commonly used in at-home peels as well as chemical peels because it has a thinning effect on the outermost layer of your skin. This means that malic acid can burn away the dead skin cells from the outermost layer of your skin, thereby allowing the younger and newer skin cells to shine through. What makes malic acid so special is that it has similar properties when compared to glycolic acid (another AHA), but is known to be less irritating to your skin.

Treatments for common skin issues – Products that contain malic acid can also be used as treatments for common skin issues such as age spots, rosacea, acne and scarring. Since the acid stimulates the growth of collagen, it promotes younger and smoother skin to shine through. This automatically reduces your skin issues and gives your skin a healthier, younger and softer feel.

Can Resveratrol Help Diabetes? Vine Vera Reviews

Diabetes medical research includes Resveratrol

Resveratrol, your friendly red wine component, has been attributed to all sorts of wonderful things like protection from free radical damage and antioxidant properties to anti-inflammatory properties and health benefits. Resveratrol is usually found in red wine and in the skin of red grapes and it is commonly derived from a plant called Japanese knotsweed as well. Previous studies have already found Resveratrol to offer all sorts of health benefits. Vine Vera reviewed one study that was conducted in the year 2012 which showed that Resveratrol helped in balancing issues when administered in a group of mice. Another study that was conducted in the year 2011 also showed that Resveratrol countered the effects of inability and helped the body to stay physically active. Other studies on Resveratrol have found that the compound works wonders in protecting the body from obesity and also reduces the risks of blood clotting. It now seems that Resveratrol might also be beneficial in helping patients suffering from Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

This revelation was made by a group of researchers in a review that was published in the Molecular Nutrition and Food Research Journal. According to this review, Resveratrol was found to be extremely effective in treating the Type 2 diabetes mellitus in animal models. The evidence from the study also suggests that Resveratrol might actually benefit Type 2 diabetes as well. This review that was conducted by the researchers is actually based on a group of studies that examined a total of 196 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. These studies had found Resveatrol to act as an adjunct to pharmaceutical intervention of the Type 2 diabetes mellitus. The studies had also shown Resveratrol to be very effective in lowering hemoglobin A1c, systolic blood pressure and creatinine concentrations.

That being said, the studies didn’t find Resveratrol to have an effect on low density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting glucose, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, diastolic blood pressure, triglycerides, insulin and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance. The studies didn’t find any adverse effects of Resveratrol in the Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients either.

Vine Vera reviewed another study that was published in the Natural Medicine Journal. The researchers associated with this study used a placebo-controlled, double-blind trial to examine the effects of Resveratrol in lowering the blood glucose and its related outcomes. The trial focused on 66 participants (33 men and 33 women) who had Type 2 diabetes. All subjects were assigned to receive 500mg of Resveratrol or placebo tablets for a period of 45 days. Once the outcomes were assessed, it was determined that Resveratrol treatments significantly decreased the systolic blood pressure, the fasting blood glucose, insulin as well as hemoglobin Ac1. No adverse effects of Resveratrol administration were found.

Moreover, Resveratrol is also known to help in preventing insulin resistance, a condition that makes the body less sensitive to the effects of insulin. Insulin resistance has already been termed as a precursor to diabetes. A number of rodent studies further confirmed that Resveratrol can help against the effects of an unhealthy lifestyle and bring about an increased longevity. Mice with a high-calorie diet actually managed to live longer after being given Resveratrol supplements.

Vine Vera Reports: Studies Show that Resveratrol Protects DNA – Vine Vera Reviews

DNA strands affected by Resveratrol

Resveratrol, the red wine antioxidant that is known to offer wonderful solutions for your skin care, has also shown to activate an ancient stress response mechanism in your cells that allow them to guard themselves against DNA damage. Vine Vera came across a study that was conducted by the scientists from the Scripps Research Institute, which explained the health benefits that have attributed to Resveratrol, a compound that is found in the skin of red grapes and in red wine.

According to the study, lower levels of Resveratrol are more than sufficient to activate the stress response system in your skin. These levels are far lower than what was previously believed and the study itself helps to clear up a lot of mystery that initially surrounded Resveratrol and the benefits that it had to offer.

Vine Vera found this study published in the Nature Journal. The study re-builds on the recent research conducted by the Scripps Research Institute, which had discovered the existence of unique mechanisms that were associated with the enzymes being studied. Resveratrol has already been attributed to the famous “French Paradox”. According to this paradox, people in France enjoy a lower cardiovascular disease rate despite their high saturated fat diet. One of the many problems in discovering the benefits that Resveratrol had to offer was to determine the correct dosage required to enjoy the benefits. Laboratory experiments had shown the need for large doses of Resveratrol in order to make it beneficial, yet the quantities consumed were tiny. This inconsistency in the argument was actually termed as the “Resveratrol Paradox”. However, thanks to the recent research from Scripps, solutions to this paradox seem to have finally been found.

The confusing results led people to challenge the French Paradox itself and the evidence of fraud tainted some of the Resveratrol research. However, despite these problems, Resveratrol continued to show amazing results when used in mice or on humans and it was shown to actually offer significant benefits. One trial showed it improved blood circulation in the human brain and helped to fight Alzheimer’s, another study found that it triggers a stress response system by targeting the tRNA synthetases enzyme and other studies found that it offered antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties to the skin. The Schimmel lab finally cleared the mystery by confirming that Resveratrol was actually beneficial for the human body because there exists a molecular resemblance between tyrosine and the chemical and this allows it to easily fit into the TyrRS binding pockets that tryrosine tends to occupy. The resulting TyrRS/ Resveratrol complex migrates into the cell nucleus and attaches itself to the PARP-1 protein, a protein that is already known to be involved in the stress response system of the human body.

According to the research conducted by Scripps, Resveratrol triggers a response system that has been deeply imbibed into the genes and dates back to hundreds of millions of years ago. Sajish, the first author of the study, mentions that it is conceivable that moderate amounts of red wine would actually offer enough Resveratrol to evoke the protective effects that can be found using this pathway. Derek Lowe, a medicinal chemist, also found the study to be fairly convincing.