Tag Archives: skincare

The Best Plant Extracts For Skin

Usually, when we think of the plights of ancient civilization, acne does not top our list. However, that does not mean skincare was not a problem for our forebears. After all, if there was a sun, was there not sun damage and, if there were pregnancies, were there not stretch marks? While we can pretty much assume our forefathers and mothers all battled with skin issues, there is a noticeable absence of the mention of benzoyl peroxide and hyaluronic acid in the history books. So what did our ancestors use to ensure skin health before the advent of “science-based skincare?” Plant extracts. And if they worked back then, shouldn’t they work now?

Let’s take a moment to investigate the best plant-based extracts for your skin that are still available.

Aloe vera

Aloe Vera
This extract has been around since time immemorial. Best known as a remedy for irritation and minor burns, this desert plant is known for its ability to fight bacteria, protect skin cells from damage, soften skin, and rebuild new tissue. Aloe is an ideal ingredient for mature skin and improves collagen levels when ingested or applied topically.

Tea Tree Oil
Ideal for moisturizing and cleansing, tea tree oils reduces sebum production in the sebaceous glands and reduces the amount of bacteria that cause blemishes to form. Its antiseptic properties make it an effective healer, it is known for its ability to safely remove dead cells from the skin and decrease the appearance of wrinkles.

Shea
Shea butter evens skin tone and protects and moisturizes the skin and scalp without clogging pores. Extracted from the nut of the West African karate tree, shea butter is naturally rich in vitamins A and E and helps restore elasticity to the skin and soothe irritation.

Shea butter

Olive Oil
Hailed as a skin care remedy by the ancient Egyptians, olive oil is still regarded as one of the most effective natural oils for skin care. It has been associated with everything from aiding in digestion to acne prevention and anti-aging. The words “Extra virgin” or “cold pressed” on the label should indicate that the olive oil contained within is the purest of all extract and have more nutritional components to improve skin appearance, but beware falsely labelled products!

Avocado
One of the finest extracts found in nature, the oil from the avocado is an extract long found in face masks, bath oils, and cleansing cream. Avocados are rich in vitamin A, which is effective at removing dead skin cells and contain amino acids which protect skin against environmental damage.

Cocoa Butter
Cocoa butter is known for the ability to reduce scars and is often recommended by surgeons to patients to reduce evidence of surgery incisions. It is credited with boosting collagen in the skin and reducing stretch marks and the appearance of wrinkles and frown lines. Cocoa butter is an active ingredient in most moisturizers and is useful in combatting rough skin where dryness is common.
Cocoa butter

Coconut Oil
Great for both hair and skin care, coconut oil is an effective moisturizer for dry skin and scalp. It can also delay the appearance of wrinkles and has been proven to be effective in the treatments of psoriasis, eczema, and dermatitis. The antioxidant properties of the coconut prevent premature aging and degenerative disease and it is available in a variety of skin care products, such as lotions, soaps, and creams.

Do you know of any plant extracts we haven’t mentioned that do wonders for your skin? Let us know your favorites. We’re all ears!

Tips for Controlling Common Skin Conditions

Dr. William’s Pink Pills For Pale People,” “Dr.Scott’s Electric Corsets and Belts, “Dr. Ayer’s Pectoral Plaster,” “Dr. Watson’s Worm Syrup.” It seems like, since time immemorial, there have been people ready to cash in on the belief that “for every problem, there is a solution.” However, attractive as it the phrase may sound, unfortunately it is not always true, and skin conditions are no exception. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t ways to make to make them better. Here is some expert advice on how you can handle some common skin conditions under control.

Under-eye bags

Under-Eye Bags
Under-eye bags are the result of fat that gathers in the lower eyelids, and become more prominent with age. According to Curology founder, David Lortscher, gravity, loss of collagen, and genetic factors are all responsible for the these pillow like protrusions, and the bad news is, they cannot be permanently eliminated and masks and eye creams usually don’t help. However, there are ways of minimizing the puffiness.

According to Lortsher, “proper head elevation during sleep, sleep itself, and decreased dietary ingestion of salt and alcohol are simple lifestyle changes that can help.” He adds, “Topical creams can also reduce swelling.” If more intense treatments are an option, the doctor allows that, “Surgical correction or blepharoplasty can lead to a semi-permanent solution. But, remember, with age and volume loss the under-eye bags can reappear.”

Melasma
Melasma is characterized by dark facial pigmentation. It is triggered by sun exposure, hormone treatments and pregnancy and may last for decades. While melasma research is still ongoing, topical treatments, such as the prescription medication Tri-Luma, are looming on the horizon and experts recommend sun avoidance and protection to keep the condition to a minimum.

Dermatologist checking skin

Stretch marks
Stretch marks appear when the tissue below your skin, called the dermis, tears after being stretched by rapid growth or weight gain. Lortscher explains that, “Stretch marks are difficult to treat because they are actually scars,” and, like most scars, may fade with time, but never fully disappear. But there is hope.

Lortscher says cosmetic fractionated layers offer the “best hope at improving the depressed and thinned texture of the skin and topical tretinoin may help to some extent through its collagen stimulating effect.”

Rosacea
Rosacea is the general term used to refer to the appearance of redness of the face, small, acne like bumps and dilated blood vessels. Rosacea affects the capillaries under the skin surface and, “As you might imagine,” Lortscher says, “there is no topical treatment that will remove these little blood vessels.”

Although rosacea is not completely curable, there are several ways to manage it. One way is to avoid triggers such as sun exposure, spicy foods, stress, and hot showers. Redness can also be decreased by using topical products containing metronidazole, tacrolimus, azelaic acid, and glycol acid.

Woman scratching her arm

Eczema
A catch all phrase applied to most skin inflammation, eczema can be caused by almost anything from stress to food allergies. Although not curable, eczema is easily controllable with topical antibiotics, emollients and steroids.

Keratosis Pilaris
About 50% of the population suffers from the genetic acne- like skin condition known as keratosis pillars. KP is usually found on the thighs and upper arms and consists of dry, rough bumps resulting from the accumulation of dead skin cells, and, as Lortscher says, is,”incurable and persistent, even with treatment.”

Thankfully, alpha hydroxy acids are helpful in sloughing off dead skin cells and allowing them to shed, so glycolic and lactic acids can be effective, as can coconut oil, although coconut oil should not be used on the face. More good news: the condition also tends to go away when the sufferer reaches his or her late 20’s or early 30’s.

What Makes A Product Noncomedogenic?

Noncomedogenic. N-O-N-C-O-M-E-D-O-G-E-N-I-C. Noncomedogenic. It sounds like the word that stumped the runner up in the fourth grade spelling bee. If you’ve been hearing this word used a lot lately in the cosmetic industry and thinking it sounds impressive, its meant to. But is it, really? Let’s break it down.

Woman squeezing pimple

A comedo is the mildest form of acne, otherwise known as a pimple, whitehead, or blackhead. So technically you could say, “Wow, that’s a rather large comedo on your face.” as a more polite way of saying, “Wow, that’s a really big zit you have.” Non, of course means without, hence, noncomedogenic, when applied to a skin cleanser essentially means the product does not clog pores and will break down excess oils on your skin without stripping necessary moisture.

What Does “Noncomedogenic” Mean?
Although the term “noncomedogenic” sounds scientific, the truth is that the effectiveness of noncomedogenic products has not been proven in clinical trials, nor has it been tested by the FDA. This is not, however, to say that such products are without merit; in fact, there is some evidence that non comedic products can reduce acne. There is, after all, proof that blocked pores can produce acne, and therefore, a product preventing occlusion of pores, may help prevent it. However, some forms of acne may be a result of other causes, such as a high presence of bacteria on the skin, and, in these cases, noncomedogenic goods would not have much effect.

In other instances, products are labelled noncomedogenic, but, in fact can cause skin rashes an irritation.

Woman cleaning face

Chemistry of Noncomedogenic Products
Noncomedogenic cleanser usually contain benzoyl peroxide, sulfur or salicylic acid. Some have ingredients to treat acne, and others are simply formulated to not aggravate pimples and clog pores.

Benzoyl peroxyde kills bacteria which causes acne and does not produce oil on the skin. Salicylic acid does not kill bacteria, but does unclog pores without creating additional oil. It also dissolves oil in the hair follicles. Sulfur washes away dead skin cells and excess oil and is also believed to be able to break down blackheads and whiteheads.

Pros and Cons Of Noncomedogenic Cleansers
Noncomedogenic. How bad could it be, right? Anything purported not to clog pores, couldn’t be too bad, right? Well, you be the judge.

Benzoyl Peroxide
If you’ve ever used benzoyl peroxide to treat acne, you probably found it to be effective. However, you will need to use it for a few weeks before you see results, and, if you discontinue use, the acne will return. Also, while you can combat the drying effects of benzoyl peroxide on skin with moisturizer, other side effects are not so easy to deal with. Itching, rashes, burning, and swelling have all been associated with the use of benzoyl peroxide and are best handled professionally.

Woman checking skin

Salicylic Acid
Like benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid requires continuous use to see results, as pores will clog up again when the skin is no longer receiving treatment. Although it can cause irritation and stinging, it is usually mild enough to work without causing serious side effects.

Sulfur
Sulfur has very few side effects, if any, and, although some may find the smell disagreeable, the odor is usually not detectable when mixed with other ingredients.

What do you think of noncomedogenic products? Does the term reassure you? Let us know!

Can Your Pimples Shed Light On Your Gastrointestinal Problems?

Woman checking pimple

“CNotes” started having really bad problems with his skin about 8 months ago. He noticed that his breakouts came in conjunction with hits stomach problems which lead him to believe that his nausea and indigestion may be the cause of his constant breakouts. He wonders if anyone has gone through a similar experience, and says, “There are so many treatments and so much information, I don’t know where to start.”

Well, CNotes, you are definitely not alone. A study investigation 13,000 adolescents found that those with acne were more prone to gastrointestinal problems like heartburn and constipation and that abdominal bloating was 37% more likely to be linked with acne. As for where to start, try here:

Clues that Your Acne Is Caused By Digestion
If you suspect that your digestion may be at the root of your acne problems, here are some clues to look for:

  1. You breakout after eating certain foods.
  2. There is no cyclical pattern to the timing of your breakouts.
  3. You are breaking out mostly on your forehead.
  4. You have frequent stomach aches.
  5. You tend to break out before, during, or after periods of gut problems.

Gastrointestinal Problems and Acne
Keep in mind that skin is an elimination system in your body and that acne is a result of the skin doing its job. Therefore, increased toxicity in the blood can lead to an increase in acne. Diets high in processed foods, sugar and trans fat can create imbalances in the body and acne can be a symptom of this.

drinking water

Lack of digestive juices in the upper GI can also lead to acne. Active digestion starts with the saliva, and if there are not enough digestive secretions to break down the food in the upper GI, food will travel undigested to the lower GI. Undigested fats in food store toxic waste, minerals, and vitamins. If fats aren’t completely broken down, they can get into the liver, intestines and bloodstream, causing the liver to go into overdrive. Eventually this slows down systems that feed the body and the body creates “collateral veins.”

When the liver is overtaxed, the body creates collateral veins to help the blood keep flowing. Collateral veins are extra blood vessels in the intestinal tract that allow the body to bypass the liver and, as a result, unfiltered, impure blood enters your body causing imbalances; acne is among these.

Healing Digestive Problems

  1. Drink Water: Water will help to carry nutrients through your body and flush out toxic buildup.
  2. Keep a Journal of What You Eat: Write down what you eat and how you feel for a wok, noting patterns. Analyze your entries to see if you notice more of less breakouts when you eat a certain food.
  3. Increase Digestion in Upper GI: Consuming bitter herbs can help increase digestion in the upper GI, as can consuming probiotic foods. Lemon balm is a recommended herb and fermented foods likekimchi, yogurt, pickles and sauerkraut are all probiotic.
  4. Heal the Lower GI: Taking demulcent herbs, such as marshmallow, can coat the lining of the intestines that are subject to damage associated with lower GI distress. Herbs that help the liver include burdock and milk thistle.
  5. Keep Track of Fats: Fat is a vital part of building energy in our body, so its important to eat good fats to sustain us.

Do you think your acne is related to your gastrointestinal problems? Let us know how you handle your challenges. Your comments and opinions can help!

Truth and Lies About Your Pores

Portrait of woman

Do you practice pore hygiene? Chances are that if you are concerned about your skin, you probably do. But how do you really know about these little holes on your face? While many truths about pores are known, there is still so much that remains so “porely” misunderstood. But now, it’s time to get down to the truth about what’s behind your pore health. Here are some truths and myths about your pores.

What Is A Pore?
Basically, pores are small opening in the surface of the skin that secrete liquid. Our bodies hold millions of them.

Two Kinds of Pores
The term pore can be confusing, because there are actually two kinds of pores that serve different functions:

Pilosebaceous Unit (Hair Follicles That Hold Oil Glands)
These are the pores most often associated with clear, or unclear, skin. The purpose of these pores are to lubricate the skin. They are located all over the body, except for on the palm and soles of the feet. When they get blocked, which happens often , skin conditions like acne can, and often do, occur

Sweat Pores
These are the ducts for our sweat glands which serve to cool our body. They are located all over, but are more highly concentrated on the groin, under the arms, and on the hands and feet. They do not normally become blocked.

Although we often associate oily skin with sweaty skin, they are not the same thing. This means a sweaty workout should not cause acne. This also means that it is impossible to “sweat out toxins” because toxins are not found in the sweat glands.

Woman in mirror

Myth 1: Pores Can Change Sizes
Pore size is determined genetically. However, sometimes stubborn blackheads can resemble large pores. When enough material accumulates, as is the case with blackheads, an invisible pore can expand to many time its size until it looks like a blemish.

Myth 2: Heat Opens Pores, Cold Closes Them
This is not only untrue because temperature does not cause pores to open and close, but also because pores do not open or close at all. This is what’s really going on.

Firstly, heat from a shower or sauna may soften debris that causes clogging of pores, making it easier to remove with extraction or exfoliation. Secondly, moisture and heat soften the skin’s connective tissue fibers, stretching the pores, and making debris easier to extract and exfoliate.

A word to the wise: While warm, moist skin is more conducive to extracting debris, it is also more prone to tearing. At home exfoliation is fine, but leave extractions to the professional. Also, avoid touching your face after exfoliation until after you wash your hands.

Porely Enough
The sad news is that pores can become more visible and larger over time because the skin stretches and slackens as collagen and elastin break down.

Surely Enough
There are a lot of things you can do to reduce pore visibility. Deep cleaning and exfoliating will decrease the look of pores and a deep cleansing facial or light peel done by a professional can remove debris without skin damage. There are also dermatology laser and light devices available to restore elasticity to skin and minimize the appearance of pores.

How do you explain your pore health? Let us know!

Transform Dull Pasty Skin

If you’re looking a little more zombie-like than you would prefer, here are some ways you can transform your dull and pasty skin into something a bit more life affirming.

Smiling woman 1. Exfoliate
When you exfoliate, your skin reflects more light. If you’re younger than 20, your skin cells rejuvenate ever 28 days, but by the time you hit for 20’s, turnover slows to between 30 and 40 days. According to Jeannette Graf, assistant clinical professor of dermatology at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, “Dead skin cells pile up, diffusing the light and making skin dull. ” Exfoliate at night rather than in the morning for best results and to remove all the dirt and grime buildup from the day.

2. Use a Highlighter
Makeup artist Mally Roncal says a champagne highlighter, “looks good on anyone.” For normal to dry skin, Roncal advises using your fingers for application. “Tap up and down your cheekbones and dab whatever’s leftover on your brow bones, the center of your chin, and the tip of your nose.” If your complexion is on the oily side, you may want to dust some powder formula over those areas with a fluffy brush.

3. Allover Body Glow
To get an all over body radiance, try botanical oils instead of lotion. The lipids found in botanical oils are the same ones that are in your skin’s natural moisture barrier. Cosmetic chemist Ni’Kita Wilson recommends coconut oil. “It’s rich in fatty acids, so it gets absorbed really quickly and leaves behind a glow instead of a shine-it looks more like your skin is lit up than lotioned up.”
Roncal weighs in on the importance of an full body shine, saying, “if your face is radiant and your body is ashy, it can look jarring. Your glow will be much more believable if you highlight your body too. However, when it comes to your body, a tinted highlighter is preferable to an untinted, which is easier to blend, while still providing a healthy glow.

Woman exfoliating skin
4. Optimal Skin Care Tips
In addition to exfoliation, there are certain ingredients you should look for to give your skin that extra brilliance.

Ceramides
Although your skin has natural enzymes to slough off dead skin cells, they don’t work as well when your skin is dry. Moisturizers with ceramides can reinforce the natural barrier of your skin and help it to rejuvenate.

Retinoids
Frederic Brandt, dermatologist says, “Your skin reflects light even better when its firm.” He suggests an over the counter or prescription strength retinoid to boost production of collagen.

Vitamin C
Use this antioxidant to brighten skin and help fade dulling sun spots.

Best Exfoliators for Your Skin

For Fair, Dry, and Sensitive Skin
If your skin comes under one of these categories, you should probably go easy on the exfoliation. Your skin type is the type most likely to become irritated and prone to dryness and age spots. Dr. Brandt recommends a lactic peel once a week. Lactic acid is made of fairly large molecules, which doesn’t penetrate as deeply as harsher acids.

For Oily and Combination Skin
If you’ve got combination or oily skin, you require deeper exfoliation than other skin types. Brandt says a cleanser with salicylic acid used daily and a scrub with microbeads used once a weel are the ways to go. “The scrub sweeps aways dead cells so the salicylic acid can clean clogged pores,” he says.

For Normal Skin
Brandt says you should use a glycolic acid peel one a week if you’ve got normal skin. Says he, “it’s one of the most effective exfoliators because it penetrates deeply.”

What do you do when your glow is low? We want to know!

How Do Self Heating Face Masks Work?

In these modern times in which technology proliferates almost ever aspect of our lives, it seems as if everything has a brain. Indeed, there appears to be nothing on the market these days that can’t do what its designed to do without us. There are self -driving cars, self -flying planes, self -cooking ovens, self- cooling cups, self- heating mugs, and even self -cleaning litter boxes. Well, now we can add a new item to the list of products with minds of their own: the self-heating face mask.

If these masks do what they claim to do, they not only have a brain, they can probably write their own book! So what do you think? Is there really something behind these magical masks? Let’s have a look. Woman getting face mask

How Do Self Heating Masks Work?
You may “warm up” to these masks when you learn that there is a method to this madness, and it’s scientific. There are chemicals in the mask that produce an exothermic reaction to water, generating heat instantly. This response opens pores in the skin, allowing the product to better penetrate to the deepest layers.

Skin care expert Joanna Vargas compares its use to her own facial treatments. “I use a steamer to activate products and enzymes I have on the skin. I also use steam to soften everything in the pores to prep for extraction.” The takeaway: If a facial is not realistic, the self-heating mask will provide similar results.

Zeolite is a mineral that is commonly used in these masks. It is derived from volcanic ash and rocks. When zeolite comes into contact with water, its chemical bonds break, releasing heat. Pores open and blood circulates, allowing oil reducing ingredients, such as kaolin, to detoxify the skin.

Why Should You Use A Self Heating Face Mask?
Ok, so they work. But do they work better than temperature stabilized masks? Edward Fallas of Somme Institute says, “Self-heating masks are essential to open pores and activate blood circulation.” Blemishes, oil overproduction or anything that involves pore opening react especially well to the self heaters. The action of the chemicals allow the other ingredients in the mask to work deeper to absorb oil and impurities.

But the real draw here might be the emotional benefit. Relaxing heat is a welcome side effect of this product and also provides much needed comfort on a nippy day.

Woman with face mask
Application
After breaking the seal on the package, squeeze the mask into your hands. You will notice the product will begin heating immediately. Massage the mask into your face for about 60 seconds, adding water if you want to increase the heat. The heat will begin its work, opening your pores. After working it into your skin, rinse with cool water; this will seal your pores. Your skin will feel tingly for a while and most users report instant radiance along with a lovely warming experience.

Sound like the ultimate pampering product to us! Why not treat yourself? And let us know how it goes for you! We’d love to hear from you.

Helping Your Skin Deal With Gravity and Free Radicals

In the book, Nature Stories, by Balachandher Krishan Guru, it reads, “Gravity is the force that attracts everything towards the center of the earth. Who or what is the cause of this force of gravity?…The best answer I can come up with is Mother Nature….Similarly, the sun shines on everyone regardless of any form of discrimination. By the way, what is the sun? It is just another part of Mother Nature.”

Ok, Guru, so it may be true that gravity and the sun are two great gifts, but, appealing to Mother Nature as a woman, why did she have to provide us with the two biggest natural components of premature aging?

Woman looking at skin
Effects of Aging on Skin
The aging of skin depends on various factor including diet, lifestyle, personal habits, and heredity. Smoking is an example of a personal habit that can produce free radicals that damage cells and cause wrinkles. Other things that cause aging? Stress, facial movement, obesity, sleep position and, of course, gravity.

Changes Occurring with age
As the skin ages, it is common to experience roughening of skin, development of lesions and benign tumors, slackening of skin and the loss of elastin tissue, increased skin transparency caused by the thinning of the epidermis, increased fragility caused by the flattening of the part of the skin where the dermis and epidermis meet, and, lastly, tendency to bruise more easily.

Changes may also occur beneath the skin. There may be a loss of fat beneath the skin in the temples, nose and eye area resulting in a sunken eyed, skeletal appearance. Bone loss, usually occurring after the age of 60, may become apparent around the chin and mouth causing the skin to pucker around the mouth. Loss of cartilage in the nose may cause the nasal tip to drip and enhance the nose’s bony structure.

Woman in the sun
Sun and Skin
Ultraviolet (UV) light from the sun damages the skin’s elastin, causing skin to stretch, sag, and lose its resilience. It also bruises and loses its ability to heal quickly. Sun exposure early in life may lead to damage later in life. The best ways to protect yourself from skin cancer and sun exposure are by covering up, wearing a hat, applying sunscreen, and staying out of the sun in general.

Other Changes
Secondary factors contributing to changes in skin are facial movement, gravity, and sleep. As skin elasticity decreases, gravity leads to drooping of the eyelids and eyebrows and the looseness go the skin under the jaw, chin, and earlobes. Facial movement causes lines to become more visible and may appear vertically over the root of the nose, horizontally on the forehead or as curved lines on the upper cheeks, temples and around the mouth.

The position in which you sleep may also influence the way your skin ages. Sleep creases are most commonly found not the side of the forehead, above the eyebrows to the hairline and on the middle of the cheeks. Sleeping on your back may be one way to prevent them, or stop them from becoming worse.

Bottom line: gravity and free radicals are bad news for your skin! Stay away from cigarettes, protect yourself from the sun, eat well and sleep on your back! Let us know how you resist gravity! We love to hear from you!

Using Aloe As A Go-To Skin Cleanser

Woman with aloe vera Those who have seen the movie, “The Campaign,” may remember the bumbling Will Ferrell character, Cam Newton attempting to recite the Lord’s prayer: “Our Father, Art, who is up in Heaven. Aloe Vera be thy name.” Although Cam may have been a little off base, it might not be that surprising if one were to find out that aloe vera is indeed included in the holy recitation. After all, aloe vera has quite a resume. It has been mentioned in the Bible, hailed by Mahatma Gandhi for helping him survive his fast, and praised by Christopher Columbus upon his landing in the New World.

In fact, the ancient aloe vera plant has been credited with everything from clearing up acne to assisting with digestive problems to fighting cancer and, as if this wasn’t enough, it now appears that aloe vera can add a new title to its impressive list; cleanser.

Protecting the Skin
The skin is the largest organ of our body and comprises our outermost, protective layer. This means it is an easy target for pollution, free radicals, and dirt which end up taking their toll, which is why women and men spend so much money and time on products and procedures to reverse the effects. The most basic of these products are cleansers.

Many products have been designed to clean skin, but some people are not so fond of the ingredients that some of them use, and find themselves bewildered by the unpronounceable ingredients on the product label. For those of you looking for an alternative, aloe vera, or products with aloe vera, may be just the solution.

Aloe Vera
Aloe Vera
Ok. Let’s take a closer look at this miraculous plant. Aloe vera is packed vitamins, minerals, and amino acids that can relieve skin and digestive complications and protect the body from free radicals, bacteria and inflammation. It also contains mucopolysaccharride, which locks in the skin’s natural moisture leaving it hydrated and fresh. Here are three ways to use it on your skin.

  1. Mix a half teaspoon of milk with a tablespoon of brown sugar in a cup. Let sit until the sugar no longer has a grainy appearance. Using a spoon, peel the aloe vera gel from its leaves and add it to the mixture. Spread the concoction on your skin allowing it to seep in for five minutes before rinsing with water.
  2. Spread the plant’s gel directly on the skin without combining it with any other ingredients. The gel can be applied as an overnight mask which should be washed off in the morning.
  3. Mix two smidgens of turmeric, a teaspoon of milk and two drops of rose water. When it turns to a pasty consistency, throw in some fresh aloe vera gel and stir it until it blends in completely with the paste. Apply the mixture to your neck and face and leave it on for up to twenty minutes before rinsing it off with warm water. Tip: Drain out yellow sap and wash off leaves before removing the gel from the plant.

If you tried any of these, we’d love to know how it went! Do you think we should add aloe vera to the Lord’s Prayer? Please drop us a line and let us know!

Temporary Diet Changes For Better Skin

Have you ever heard the expression, “It’s all fun and games until someone gets a zit?” No? Well, truer words were probably never spoken. Have you been living the high life, staggering out of bed sometime in the mid afternoon to a “breakfast” of last night’s pizza washed down by soda? Did you overdo it at the bar last night? Did you have to go to MacDonald’s because you forget to go to the supermarket? We all know the devil-may-care attitude can be fun- until you look in the mirror. Your skin is probably the first part of you to show the effects of a less than healthy lifestyle, but never fear, with a few temporary dietary changes, you could be back on the road to beautiful skin in no time.

woman with chocolate
Dark Chocolate
Although for years we have been attributing our acne breakouts to it, chocolate is now being hailed as a superfood for your skin and health in general. Cocoa provides hydration to the skin, making it more supple and firm. Dr. David Bank, MD, says. Nicholas Perricone, MD and NYC dermatologist adds, “Dark chocolate contains high levels of flavonols, a potent type of antioxidant.” To get the maximum dose of flavanol, make sure your chocolate is at least 70% cacao.” L.A. dermatologist Jessica Wu says, “When applied topically, the caffeine in chocolate may temporarily reduce skin puffiness.” Is that bar in your mouth yet?

Greek yogurt
Yogurt

Anyone for froyo? Dr. Wu says the protein found in dairy makes skin more resistant to wrinkles. DR. Wu recommends Greek Yogurt as your yogurt of choice saying that, “The protein content is often double that of regular yogurt.”

Sunflower Seeds
Crack open the vitamin E and protect your skin’s top layers from sun damage. A daily handful will provide a high content of essential fatty acids and sunflower seed oil can also relieve parched lip and heels.

Pomegranates
Dr. Perricone says pomegranates are packed with polyphenol antioxidants that fight free radicals and relate blood flow to the skin, making it rosy. To get results, eat one fruit or a few glasses of its juice every day. Pomegranates can also be applied topically to moisturize and smooth fine lines.

Peppers
Peppers help your peepers! Dr. Wu says, “Women who eat green and yellow vegetables regularly tend to have fewer wrinkles, especially around the eyes.” The carotenoids in yellow and orange vegetables are also great for reducing skin’s sun sensitivity. Try for two cups daily for a crisp, tangy skin booster.

Kidney Beans
Kidney Beans
Zap zits with zinc! The high levels of zinc may be just the thing for your blemishes. Dr. Wu says, “That may be because of zinc’s healing properties.” A four ounce serving of kidney beans should keep your skin clear.

Soy
Let’s hear it for the soy! Dr. Bank says, “Soy contains minerals and proteins that have been shown to reduce hyper pigmentation.” One cup a day should give you what it takes to even out your skin. tone.

So has this convinced you to make some dietary changes? Let us know if they worked! We always love to hear from you!