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vine vera banner presents Ingredients to Avoid In Your Skincare

Ingredients To Avoid In Your Skincare

Hyaluronic acid, glycolic acid, peels, exfoliants, mud, clay, retinol, vitamins A-Z, ceramides, essential oils; sometimes it seems like there are too many skincare ingredients to fit in one product, much less on the human face. Add that to the new layering trend, and, it may even seem like companies are creating more room on the human face for even more products. If you’re confused about which ingredients to look for when you’re looking to buy your next skin care product, maybe you should focus on what not to use. The FDA has only so much say in what goes into and what stays out of your cosmetic products, so for optimal health, you may need to be the one who makes the decisions. Here are some ingredients to avoid in your products to help you narrow it down.

Aluminum
Aluminum is a chemical salt you don’t want to find in your skin care products. It is used for its disinfectant and absorbent properties and is most often found in deodorants and antiperspirants. Recent studies of breast cancer patients detected higher amounts of aluminum is the outer areas of the breast, where deodorant is normally applied. A study published in the Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health showed that the accumulation of aluminum in bodily tissues can lead to bone disease, tissue damage, impaired kidney function, and has also been found in the brains of those suffering Alzheimer’s disease. Opt for aluminum free natural deodorants and antiperspirants.

Hydroquinone
Hydroquinone is a compound commonly used for lightening of freckles, melanoma, age spots and discolorations which has been found to increase exposure to UV rays and cause mutations in laboratory studies. The chemical has been shown to cause contact dermatitis, and degeneration of collagen and elastin fibers in the skin. Doctors warn pregnant women to avoid its use during pregnancy and nursing, and the Environmental Working Group has assigned a hazardous warning to the compound. Vitamin C in the form of ascorbic acid may be a better choice for skin brightening.

Fragrance
Fragrance can be intoxicating, in more ways than one. Apparently, fragrance can contain up to 200 undeclared ingredients, some of which may be hormone altering preservatives called phthalates, and you may have no way of knowing. Since companies don’t have to give a chemical breakdown of fragrances, it is difficult to tell the exact components of the scent. Problems such as coughing, vomiting, hyper pigmentation, allergies, skin rashes, and dizziness have all been known to occur from the use of synthetic fragrances. A word to the wise: avoid the word “fragrance” on the ingredient label unless it is derived from essential oils.

Parabens
Parabens can include propyl, butyl, methyl, and ethyl parabens. This group of preservatives extend shelf life of cosmetics, and are estimated to be contained in over 90% of all beauty products. A 2006 study of the urine sample of healthy adults showed evidence of parabens in over 90 percent of the participants.

Phthalates
You probably don’t want to find any chemicals used to make plastics in your cosmetic supplies. Phthalates are chemicals derived from oil, often found in product like perfume, hair spray, and nail polish and are often used to help the product cling to the skin, nails, and hair. The fear is that these products may be absorbed through the skin, fingernails, and lungs. Animal studies have shown an association between phthalates and kidney, liver, lung, and reproduction system damage. Human studies have shown abnormal development in male infants whose mothers show high levels of phthalates in their bodies. You may especially want to look out for dibutyl phthalate (DBP) di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), and butylbenzylphthalate (BBP) on ingredient lists.

What ingredients are you looking to avoid on your beauty products? Let us know! It may be helpful!

Six Reasons To Use A Serum

woman examining herself in the mirror

CTM. Cleanser. Toner. Moisturizer. It’s all you need. The three basic steps. Everything else is just unnecessary, right? We’re all into compacting our skin routines, finding products that multitask and cutting out the extraneous, and these can be valuable time-savers. However, the serum may be a rare exception. It’s one of those products that is worth investing a few extra minutes a day for. In fact, if you’re already using a serum, you might even say it’s worth sacrificing a few minutes of sleep for. What is it about this wonder product that makes it such a great investment? Read on to find out.

They’re Powerful
According to Zoe Weisman, director of product development at Advanced Clinicals, it has a lot to do with content. “Serums tend to be more concentrated when it comes to the active ingredient.” That means that whatever the star ingredient in your serum, be it retinol, vitamin C, hyaluronic acid or another noted skin enhancer, a serum is likely to have a more potent dose that your average moisturizer with the same active ingredient. Weisman also advises looking for a product in an opaque bottle with an airtight lid to prevent oxidation. Smiling woman in white at mirror

There’s One For Everyone
If your skin tends to be on the dry side, Weisman suggests investing in a serum with hyaluronic acid to draw moisture to the skin, which will help to plump up lines and fill in depressions. If dark spots are your concern, vitamin C will prevent damage and hyper pigmentation, while vitamin A (retinol) will increase cell turnover and decrease wrinkles.

Layering
Another of benefit of serum is their light weight and easy absorption, which lend themselves to layering. That means you can combine serums to address different problems, or add one under your moisturizer, SPF, or foundation without creating a pile up.

Eye Serums are the New Eye Cream
If you’re looking to compartmentalize your beauty routine, while still incorporating a serum, you may want to give your sticky eye cream its walking papers. “The ideal,” says Weisman, “is a milky serum. You get the light texture and high potency of serum plus the milky aspect that makes it moisturizing.”

Happy woman applying eye serum at mirror

Benefits Go Below the Neck
If you love your serum, why stop at the jawline? There are serums designed for the neck and décolletage. “If you think about it, ” says Weisman, “this is a bad time for necks since we’re always hunched over our phones.” In fact, if you’re really serum happy there are full body serums to soften stretch marks, and smoothen cellulite, and hand serums to moisturize and treat age spots.

Penetration
Penetration. We’re always wondering whether it happens or not. With serums, the answer is a resounding, “Yes.” Serums’ lightweight formulas absorb better and penetrate more deeply into your skin than moisturizer, so you get better results with no residue.

Why do you love your serum? Let us know what your serum does for you!

Classic Home Remedies That Just Might Work

vine vera presents Classic Home Remedies That Just Might Work Probably the last thing a teenage girl wants from her mother is advice. Mom wears Mom jeans. Mom wouldn’t know the latest fashion if she saw it on the runway, and she would probably die if she knew about your eyebrow waxing appointment. However, as we get older we come to realize that there is some truth to the saying “Mother Knows Best,” and that may include some things beauty. While you may not find your Mom too eager to apply Punk Rock Purple lipstick or rock some aquarium style nail tips, she may have some, Michelle well, safer suggestions that actually might interest you. Here is some of the best old fashioned beauty advice that may make you the most trendy fashionista of all.

Fresh Cream For Skin
One teenager remembers the advice she got from her Grea-Michelle Duffy says that living on a farm gave her grandma’s sister access to the cream from the top of fresh milk. After 95 years of doing so, she still had “beautiful, soft skin, with barely a wrinkle,” says Duffy.

Rhubarb for Wrinkles and Redness
Some people owe their mothers their lives in more ways that one. After being diagnosed with a fatal case of childhood leukemia, Boldijarre Koransky, currently president of Eminence Organic Skincare, took the advice of his mother and grandmother and started eating the foods from their garden. “They fed me organically, biodynamic foods, believing that by providing me with the purest nutrition on earth, I would get better.”

And better he got. Years later, Koronczay is still a believer in the power of the plant. Rhubarb, he says, is “a good source of ascorbic acid and Vitamin C which makes it great for fighting wrinkles.” He also points out that when applied topically, rhubarb’s astringent and disinfecting properties can help to heal blemishes and wounds.

Witch Hazel
If rhubarb doesn’t do the trick, Witch Hazel surely will. It became Kelly Scarpelli’s “favorite astringent because it had natural oils that didn’t dry out her skin,’ and confesses, “After my mom told me Witch Hazel would unclog pores and get rid of blackheads, I used it every day.”

vine vera presents Classic Home Remedies That Just Might Work

Egg White Face Mask
Seeing was believing for Lindsay Troyer Shannon. She says, “My mom whisked one raw egg white and applied it to her face until it dried.” Troyer Shannon says that this application done weekly gave her mom, “the most amazing skin.”

Apple Cider Vinegar
When the greasy buildup from the continual use of shampoo became a problem for Mickey Duncan, her mom set her straight with some apple cider vinegar. “She taught me to use apple cider vinegar to give my hair a good cleaning. The use of apple cider vinegar is recommended once weekly to clear hair of shampoo buildup.

Cod Liver Oil
Dr. Peggy Fuller talks of her childhood cod liver associations. “We all lined up to take it. The taste was not bad to me, but oh, that smell.” Eventually, though, the immune supporting anti oxidants in the gel caps won Peggy over. ” I developed an affinity for it, and believe it lessened my childhood asthma.”

Coconut Oil
Casey Higgins grew up watching mom, Rita, use coconut oil to take off her makeup. When Casey decided to adopt a more holistic life style, she too took up the practice. She just rubs the oil into her skin wherever there is makeup and then wipes it off with a warm wet cloth to clean her face daily.

Shawna Steward learned to listen to her mama back when she was in summer camp. She recalls her mother having to pick her up from the pool, “because I woke up from a nap with throbbing red lobster legs.” When Shawna got home, she found herself sitting “in a tub with about two inches of lukewarm water, draped tea-soaked towels on my legs,” which she let “soak for twenty minutes until they stopped singing.”

Do you have any old fashioned remedies that your mom taught you? Let us know how cool you found out your Mom was when it came to beauty know how.

The Many Benefits Of Acupuncture

vine vera presents The Many Benefits Of Acupuncture

Cupping, feces face masks, microdermabrasion; with all the latest beauty and health procedures, one more bizarre than the next, it would seem that acupuncture has been relegated to the “Where Are They Now?” files along with the stars of most nineties sitcom stars. While the concept of poking needles in the skin as a way of treating various health issues may have seemed edgy a few decades ago, it now seems rather tame in comparison to some of the newer approaches. However, what comes around goes around, and if something old is discovered to have a new value, it may be worth reinvestigating. Recent studies show that ear acupuncture may help in weight loss. Shall we investigate?

Auricular Acupuncture
Auricular acupuncture, aka, acupuncture of the ear, was a discipline first used in France in 1956. When Dr. Paul Nogier began to notice that the pain of a backache could be relieved by burning the ear of the sufferer, he began mapping the ear to locate spots correlating to various bodily systems and organs. The doctor’s strategy entailed envisioning the ear as a curled fetus with the head pointing downward, and he delivered treatment by applying pressure to the spot corresponding to each organ.

The Study
In order to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture treatments in weight loss, researchers compared the Korean standard five point acupuncture treatment with single point stimulation. A control group which received a fake treatment was also used.

The study included 91 Koreans, 75 women, and 16 men, all of whom had a body mass index of 23 or greater. None of them had received treatments for weight control in the past six months. The participants were divided into three groups, the first of which received the five point treatment, the second of which received the one point treatment, and the third of which received the fake treatment.

vine vera presents The Many Benefits Of Acupuncture

The Groups
The first group had needles positioned at five points in the ear corresponding to the Shen-men, stomach, spleen, hunger, and endocrine system, which would remain in place for a week, at which time, the needles would be inserted in the other ear, in a process that would be repeated over the eight week trial.The second group had the same treatment, but only one needle was inserted, at the hunger point.

The third group believed that were receiving the five point treatment, but the needles were actually removed right after insertion; however, the group was not notified of the removal and the surgical tape remained to prevent the participants from discovering the truth. All three groups were assigned restricted diets and asked not to exercise during the trial.

The Results
Of the participants who completed the study (24 dropped out) those who received the five point treatment showed a 6.1% reduction in BMI by the middle of the trial, the one point group showed a 5.7% reduction and the group that received fake treatment showed no change at all. The researchers conclude: “Both five needle acupuncture treatment generally used in Korean clinics and one-needle treatment at the hunger point appears to be effective in reducing body weight in the short term.”

Let us know what you think. Would you consider acupuncture as a way of achieving your weight loss goals?

Sometimes You Shouldn’t Feel the Burn

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“Ya burnt!” It’s one of the latest things milennials say when they think they’ve sassed you. You don’t want to get it from your teenage son, and you definitely don’t want to get it from your skin care products. Sure, we all like the tingling feeling that let’s us know our skin care products are doing their jobs, but we definitely don’t want the redness, peeling, and flaking that comes from applying harsh products daily, and sometimes its hard to tell the difference. How can we tell when ‘its working” turns into “ya burnt?” Here is a little insight from the pros.

The Burn
Lucille White, MD and Houston dermatologist says, “No pain, no gain is a terrible motto when dealing with your face, ” and Karyn Grossman, MD warns that daily stinging and flaking “are signs of chronic inflammation.” Grossman warns that this can lead to an array of other issues, such as tightness, dryness, and an increase in sensitivity.

However, here’s the confusion. Some proven care ingredients, such as retinoids and acids sting as they work. In these cases, a short period of stinging may be par for the course. So how can you tell when it’s gone too far?

Scrubs and Exfoliants
The word acid may be a clue as to whether or not the burning is a cause for concern. According to Dr. Grossman, any product with glycolic, lactic, alpha-hydroxy, or salicylic acid may cause some tingling. “The sensation could be because of their acidic pH or the concentration of the acid,” she says. She also warns that the feeling should be intermittent. Daily tingling could be problematic. Bottom line: if your peel stings, it’s probably ok, but your cleanser shouldn’t, and neither should most scrubs. Unless it has been formulated to be “energizing”, scrubs with microbeads and grains shouldn’t sting.

Face Cleansing Brushes
Using a face cleaning brush should not feel any rougher than using a washcloth. Grossman says, “The machine is doing all the work. All your hands should be doing is gently holding it to your skin. Don’t do that and scrub.” You should not be applying pressure on the brush, or work your hand in a scrubbing motion, simply hold it to your skin and let it do the work for you. Anything additional, and White says, “You’re scrubbing off too much of your skin.”

Using A Toner
Toners should not sting. Grossman says, “Alcohol evaporates quickly and feels so cooling.” While you may feel a tingling if your skin is inflamed from acne or other skin issues, you may feel a tingling, but otherwise, you may not feel anything at all. If you do feel some stinging, you may want to do a quick check of the ingredients, to see if the toner contains any acid. If that’s the case, the sensation may be completely normal.

Zit Zapping
When it comes to acne prevention, it usually comes down to one of two ingredients: salicylic acid or benzoyl peroxide. While salicylic acid might sting, especially if you apply it to a picked pimple, benzoyl peroxide should not. However, benzoyl peroxide may parch skin which can cause peeling over time. Using too many acne ingredients can always be a recipe for dry, tight, or flaky skin. If you experience such irritation from your acne fighting products, you may want to try using a more calming formula with anti microbial ingredients.

What do you think? Can you tell when the tingling sensation may be too much of a good thing? Let us know your experiences.

Dissolving Fillers To Reveal Natural Beauty

woman getting filler-dissolving treatment

From the time we saw Bruce Springsteen drag her on the the stage in the “Dancing InThe Dark” video, the nation fell in love with Courtney Cox. We watched her grow up as the charming, if high-maintenance Monica on “Friends,” and then the naughty older lady on “Cougartown.” However, we began to notice a small change, at this time. Was Courtney’s face looking a bit stiffer? Her lips perhaps a little too plump? Had our girl been dabbling in facial fillers?

If you’re a Courtney fan, you may have heard of her latest brave decision to break ties with her facial fillers, in a decision that may be gaining popularity. If you’re thinking of following in Courtney’s footsteps, here’s a little info on dissolving facial fillers.

Why Filler Dissolves
Hyaluronic acid filler, which is usually injected in the lips and cheeks, come from a molecule that already exists in the skin to provide moisture. New York Plastic surgeon Dr. David Shafer says, “The only difference is in the laboratory, they connect them by chemical bonds, that’s what makes it stay in shape when it’s in your body. But over about eight months to two years, your body starts to metabolize it and break apart those bonds and then you just absorb it like you would normal, natural hyaluronic acid.

Dissolving Fillers on Purpose
If you don’t want to wait for your filler to dissolve, there are ways to speed the process. In the past four years doctors have begun to inject an enzyme that helps to break down the chemical bonds in the hyaluronic acid. “it’s breaking apart the gel under the skin and your body just absorbs it like it would your own natural hyaluronic acid.

woman receiving filler dissolving enzyme

What Is It Like?
Dissolving filters is a relatively quick process, in which the enzyme is injected into the area where the filler is using a small needle. Shafer says, “it’s not a painful procedure. Usually patients say they feel a little bit of warmth or tingling in the area as the enzyme is working.” Some results are noticeable immediately, while others take 24 hours to work completely. A follow up appointment is recommended two days after the first to see if the procedure was effective, and take additional steps if necessary.

Cost
The procedure commonly starts at $400 per treatment.

Fillers that Can’t Be Dissolved
While the enzyme is a great way to dissolve hyaluronic acid fillers, other fillers won’t response immediately. Those whose injectables are Radiesse, which is made out of hydroxyapatite, or Sculptra, which contains collagen stimulating particles, may just have to wait it out. Radiesse fillers last about a year to a year and a half, while Sculptra lasts 2-3 years.

Get It Right the First Time
Just because fillers are reversible, doesn’t mean you shouldn’t put in some consideration before you get them. Dr. Schafer says, “Fillers and Botox can make really nice changes for people, they just have to be done conservatively. If it’s getting to be too much or not looking natural, I’m going to tell people ‘no.'”

What do you think of getting fillers dissolved? Good move or bad? Let us know where you stand on the issue.

Scar Treatment Options

woman checking skin in mirror

In movies, good guys scar in a fashionable attractive manner, usually in the form of a pale line strategically placed to make the character look rugged and cute at the same time. However, life is not a movie and we don’t all get so lucky. While some of us may have the good fortune of possessing the perfect scar, others of us spend our lives trying to visualize ourselves scar-free.

Although there is no method for scar removal as yet, there is hope; there are ways to lessen the appearances of scars, and you may even end up turning your less than perfect scar into something straight out of a movie. Here’s a look at scars, what they are and options for treatment.

What Is A Scar?
Scars are natural parts of the healing process of the body, usually resulting from wound repair in the skin and other tissues. Scars can be the results of diseases, accidents, surgeries, or skin conditions, such as acne.

How Do Scars Form?
Scars form when the dermis, a thick, deep layer of skin is damaged. The body forms new collagen fiber to mend the damage, but the new tissue is of a different texture and quality than the original. When the damage has healed, a scar forms.

Hypertrophic to Keloid scars
Although most scars are pale and flat, sometimes the body overproduces collagen and the scar is raised. These kinds of scars are most common in dark-skinned and younger people.

Pitted scars
Other scars have a sunken appearance. These scars result when underlying structures supporting the skin, such as fat and muscle, are lost. Pitted scars are communal the results of surgery or acne.

Stretched skin
Scars appearing as stretched skin occur when the skin stretches rapidly, as in during pregnancy or when skin is under tension while healing.

woman receiving dermabrasion treatment

Scar Treatment Options
While scars cannot be removed completely there are some ways of minimizing their appearance:

  • Topical Treatments
    Although many commercial skin care products such as vitamin E and cocoa butter cream claim to heal scars, they are not effective and should be avoided.
  • Surgery
    There is no specific surgery that can guarantee scar removal, but there are surgical procedures which can be used to change the shape of a scar, or diminish its appearance. In the cases of keloid or hypertrophy scarring, surgery is not recommended because there is a possibility of recurring scars, and even more severe scarring as a result of the surgery.
  • Steroid Injections
    Repeated steroid injections can help to flatten the scars appearance, thus softening the look of keloid or hypertrophic scars.
  • Radiotherapy
    Low dose radiotherapy can be used to prevent the recurrence of hypertrophic and keloid scarring, however, it is only recommended in extreme cases because of its association with long term side effects.

woman receiving dermabrasion treatment on legs

  • Dermabrasion
    Dermabrasion is the removal of the skin’s surface using special equipment. While it may be useful on a raised scar, it may not be as effective when the scar is sunken.
  • Laser Resurfacing
    Dermabrasion’s laser manipulating cousin, traditional dermabrasion involves removing surface layer of skin with the use of lasers. More modern types of lasers may be able to work on the collagen in the dermis without skin removal. This advancement would require less down time than the more conventional resurfacing methods.
  • Filler Injections
    Fillers can be used to raise sunken scars to match the level of the surrounding skin. However, it is to be noted, that the effects of fillers are temporary and may need to be repeated regularly.

What is your experience with scar treatment? Let us know what you recommend.

Ceramides: The Trending Skincare Ingredient You Should Know About

vine vera banner presents Ceramides: The Trending Skincare Ingredient You Should Know About

You take your beauty products seriously. You know there are heaps of products on the market, each claiming to have more advanced ingredients than the next, and new ingredients being touted as the next best thing in skin care almost every other day. To some, all this information may seem hard to keep track of; some have long stopped trying – but not you. You know the importance of finding a product that really works, and that means you need to be aware of what every ingredient does as soon as they hit the market. That’s why you need to know about ceramides. What are they? Do they work? Read on to find out about the latest trending ingredient you need to know about.

What Are Ceramides?
Ceramides are an oily wax that forms a waterproofing barrier in the upper layers of our skin, helping the skin retain water while repairing the skin’s natural barrier and regulating cells. As we age, out production of ceramides lessons, resulting in wrinkles, dry skin, and even dermatitis.

Topical Application Of Ceramides
While there is some evidence that ceramics have a positive effect on skin when ingested, topical application is the preferred and more common method.

Do Ceramides Retain Water?
Ceramides waterproof skin. They do this best when combined with other oily materials. When combined with cholesterol and free fatty acids in a certain ratio, they have been found to have moisture retaining qualities.

Do Ceramides Penetrate?
Ceramides are “skin identical.” This means it is naturally occurring in skin’s upper layers. This allows topically applied ceramics to move into the upper layer of skin easily, in a method known as “tape stripping.” This means that the ceramides stick to your skin, much like a piece of tape, analyze it and then “tear it off” enabling it to move into the next layer of skin, eventually penetrating quite deeply.

Is There Proof They Work?
Although not every study is dependable, due to control issues, here are a few findings from some pretty credible sources.

A study done on mice that ran in the J Clin Exp Dermatol showed that topical ceramides can not only keep the skin barrier intact, they can protect it from future damage.

According to a Japanese study, plant derived ceramides have more skin hydrating properties than placebos.
A study by the Kao Corporation showed that creams containing ceramide E increases water content in the skin, and reduces symptoms of atopic dermatitis.

The Textbook of Cosmetic Dermatology found that some combinations of ceramides work better than placebos at repairing the function of the skin barrier.

Picking the Right Ceramide
Not all ceramides were created equal. Some just provide an occlusive layer that locks in moisture, In this case, ceramides may work no better than petrolatum for skin care Others penetrate and moisturize from within, and have a longer lasting effect than other conventional treatments. The best formulas combine with fatty acids and cholesterols to imitate the natural moisture of the skin. While it is impossible to know the best lotion without seeing the formula, you can be pretty sure that price is a good indicator. Unfortunately, when it comes to ceramides, you usually get what you pay for. However, as you know, the savvy consumer always gets his or her money’s worth.

Have you used a ceramide? What do you think?Which do you find work best on your skin?

Topical Nutrients That Boost Your Skin’s Glow

woman in blue with glowing skin

Topical or oral, that is the question to be decided. When it comes to skin care, is it best to apply our vitamins directly to the affected area, or is it better to ingest them?. On the one hand, our skin is an outward expression of what’s going on in our bodies, including aging. This being the case, we should take our vitamins orally; healthy body, healthy skin, right? However, do you ever wonder if the vitamins know where to go after they are consumed? Is there a vitamin whisperer in your body directing the vitamin E to your crows feet? Apparently not. Clinical Professor Mary Lupo says, “The body delivers only a certain percentage of vitamins to your skin no matter how much you ingest.” That means, if you want to confront the problem head on, you’re probably best with a topical approach. Here are topical nutrients to boost skin’s glow.

Vitamin A
Vitamin A (the derivatives are known as retinoids) is probably the best remedy for wrinkles, roughness and brown spots. Commonly found in night creams, OTC lotions, and prescription products, vitamin A is one of the strongest proven anti-agers on the market. According to Doris Day MD, “There are more than 700 published studies on retinoids. They’re tried and true ingredients. Anyone who wants younger skin should use one.”

As for application, retinoids are best applied at night, as sunlight renders vitamin An inactive. Prescription retinoids work fastest, but tend to be irritating; OTC products are better for beginners. To avoid irritation, begin by using the vitamin A treatment sparingly every two or three nights, gradually building to nightly use.

Vitamin B-3
If redness is an issue for you, its B-3 to the rescue. Often referred to as niacinamide on the labels of creams, lotions, and serums, B-3 known to increase skin’s fatty acid and ceramide production, strengthening the skin’s barrier. Leslie S. Baumann, MD, explains, “As that barrier is strengthened, skin is better able to keep moisture and irritants out if your complexion is dry or sensitive.” One study showed it to effectively reduce blushing and redness caused by rosacea.

B-3 can also minimize dark spots by inhibiting pigment transfer to skin cells. B3 can be applied morning and evening and can be used in conjunction with retinoids to reduce the retinoid irritation.

vine vera banner presents Topical Nutrients That Boost Your Skin's Glow

Vitamin C
When it comes to skin health, vitamin C o gets superstar status. However, don’t expect top billing for vitamin C. C should be listed near the middle of the panel of ingredients to ensure the concentration of 5% or higher needed to make an impact on skin.

Vitamin C quenches free radicals that lead to wrinkling, and sagging, and helps to firm and smooth skin while fading dark spot. One study showed women who used a vitamin C cream on their sun damaged skin for six months saw a noticeable improvement in fine lines and wrinkles. Vitamin C is best applied in the morning right before sunscreen to protect from UV free radicals.

Vitamin E
Because vitamin E is known for its ability to hydrate and boost skin’s UV defense, it is commonly found in sunscreens or sun related skin products. It’s recommended 1 % concentration will usually place it near the middle of the ingredients label. Vitamin E eases dryness by helping skin to maintain its natural moisture and it is known for its powerful ability as a neutralizer of free radicals. One study showed vitamin E was actually able to reduce the number of unstable molecules caused by cigarette smoke. Others showed skin treated with vitamin E before UV exposure was less swollen red and dry.

While vitamin E’s protection from sun exposure makes it ideal for application before and after the sun soak, it should be noted that a strong single blast of UV light can destroy half of the skin’s natural supply of the vitamin, and it is best to use a sunscreen with both E and C to ensure effectiveness.

Let us know what vitamins you’re delivering straight to the spot.We love to hear what your favorite topical nutrients are.

The Natural Mineral That’s Good For Your Skin

vine vera banner presents The Natural Mineral That's Good For Your Skin

Good skincare can be hard to come by. Quality ingredients can be costly, and some products don’t even contain a high enough percentage of the good stuff to be effective. But, what if you found out that there was a good skincare product that covered about 71% of the earth, and that there was no scarcity of it, in fact, there were oceans of it. The list of the benefits of salt water for your skin is becoming more and more widely acknowledged lately and might be worth investigating. Read on to find out why you might want to bring a jar the next time you’re at the beach.

Salt’s Effect On the Body
Ok, so let’s start with the basics. What is salt? Salt is a combination of chloride and sodium found in at least three percent of our oceans. When the water evaporates, the salt crystal is left behind, and it is in these natural salt crystals that vital nutrients are found. With a rich mineral content including key minerals like potassium, magnesium, and calcium, salt has been known to boost weight loss, improve levels of blood sugar, reduce symptoms of asthma, and regulate cardiovascular health.

All salts are not created equal
Ok, so before you go rubbing table salt on your skin, you should be aware that table salt is bleached and highly processed and has probably been stripped of anything that could possibly be of benefit to your health. In fact, when doctors warn against salt, it is probably table salt to which they are referring. When it comes to skin care, you’re better off with the unprocessed salts.

Sea Salt
Natural sea salt is a good choice for skin care. It is made of many of the minerals naturally occurring in our bodies already, including calcium, sodium, magnesium, and potassium, all of which help in cell communication and healing. Sea salt will prevent mineral deficiencies which can result in dry, dull skin, blotchiness, and irritation, improving hydration and strengthening skin’s outer layer.

Pink Himalayan Salt
Only recently popularized in Western culture, people from the Khewra Salt Mine in Pakistan, have been reaping the benefits of pink Himalayan salt for over 2,000 years. Also unprocessed, it is full of the skin strengthening minerals that the body needs.

Benefits of Salt Water
So, you may be wondering how exactly this natural commodity works on your skin. Here are some of salt water’s reputed benefits:

Salt water can

  • Close open pores
  • Absorb excess oil
  • Kill bacteria that causes acne
  • Lessen the appearance of scars
  • Exfoliate dead skin
  • Restore skin’s pH levels
  • Reduce inflammation
  • Increase hydration
  • Speed the healing process

Drinking Salt Water
While you may have guessed that it is not advisable to drink anything you might find in the ocean, you’re the own brew of salt water may help to detoxify cells and improved digestion, in fact, there’s even a name for it. A warm glass of salt water, known as “Sole” is the new way to start the day and begin internal healing. A natural form of salt added to warm water will aid digestion, reduce inflammation, detoxify cells, and improve your sleep and bone health.