Tag Archives: Skincare ingredients

5 Common Skin Care Ingredients That Can Cause Allergies

Woman checking face at mirror

Were you the kid in school who could never eat the cookies during snack time because you had a nut allergy? Life is rough for the allergy sensitive. Whenever there is something great that everyone seems to love, it makes you break out in hives or start sneezing uncontrollably. Like skin care products. Just when you find a skincare product that is really working for you, it turns on you, causing you to break out itching and scratching. While little can be done to stop your allergies, there are ways to save some heartache, by avoiding certain products, to begin with. Here are some ingredients to look out for when you’re buying products.

Salicylic Acid
Dendy Engelmen, MD, explains that salicylic acid is, “the same active ingredient in aspirin and three to five percent of the population is sensitive to aspirin too.” If your product contains salicylic acid, you’re probably using it to fight blemishes, but you should know that it’s likely to cause inflammation and hives as well. The allergy sensitive is better off using benzoyl peroxide.

Aluminum
Aluminum is usually found lurking in your antiperspirant or deodorant because it reduces sweating. However, because it is a salt, it can also cause itching, swelling, and redness. Engleman recommends using magnesium oil, which prevents sweating using ninasium chloride, or aluminum-free antiperspirants and deodorants.

Glycolic Acid
It seems that the things about glycolic acid that make it so good for your skin are the same things that make it so bad for your skin. David Bank, MD, explains, “This acid is so small that it’s very good at penetrating into the skin. On the efficacy side, it’s great. But that rapid entry can make it more irritating.” If you’re experiencing redness or drying from glycolic acid, you may want to replace it with lactic acid, which is, “physically larger so it releases more gradually over time.”

Sulfate
Bank clarifies that “When people use the word sulfates, they’re particularly referring to sodium lauryl sulfate. These detergents are found in cleansers and shampoos and can cause redness and dryness on sensitive eczema-prone skin.” For a milder treatment, look for products which are sulfate free or shampoos containing sodium laureth sulfate instead.

Retinol
It may be great for fighting aging, but it’s also pretty good at drying out skin. Bank says, “Retinol still remains the gold standard for anti-aging, reversing sun damage and stimulating collagen, The major drawback is that it can be on the drying and irritating side.” He does add, however, that the unpleasant side effects tend to be more uncomfortable than toxic.

Allergic? Let us know what skin care ingredients you think we should avoid. We love to hear it.

Luxurious Skincare Ingredients That Are Trending Right Now

Woman on bed of flowers

Those of us who have done our homework will know that retinol has often been referred to as the “gold standard in skincare,” but what about gold itself? Could gold be the “gold standard in skincare” or are we talking about apples and oranges here? When it comes to skincare, it is no secret that most women are prepared to pay a king’s ransom for a product that works, and, while there is truth in the saying, “You get what you pay for,” you do need to know what you’re paying for. Let’s look at some skincare ingredients that give new meaning to the words, “pretty penny” to see if they’re truly worth their weight in gold.

Gold
We all know that gold is precious in and of itself, but can it also be useful? As it turns, out, the metal has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that can decrease acne and redness and protect skin from free radicals. Colloidal gold, which is composed of particles of gold suspended in liquid, has been used in injection for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Maybe the term “golden glow” has more to it than we thought.

Pearl in seashell

Pearls
Ever wonder why flawless skin is often referred to as “pearlescent?” While a relatively novel skincare concept in the Western world, pearls have been a long held beauty secret of Asian royalty since ancient times. Crushed pearls were used to give skin a luminous glow during the Ming Dynasty and pearls have been used in traditional Chinese medicine because of their detoxifying and anti-inflammatory abilities. Pearls also have high calcium content and contain trace minerals, amino acids, and conchiolin, a protein that helps restore collagen to skin.

Caviar
Largely popularized by the reported usage of Baerli sturgeon caviar by Angelina Jolie to rid her body of stretch marks resulting from the birth of her twins, fish eggs have been reputed to have beneficial effects on skin. While its effect on stretch marks is a matter of dispute, caviar does contain antioxidants like Omega 3 and Omega 6 fatty acids that can promote production of collagen and prevent cellular inflammation. It also has selenium and potassium, which may increase skin’s elasticity.

Ginseng

Ginseng
Red ginseng is often used in skincare to relieve dryness, brighten dark spots and under eye circles, and reduce wrinkles and fine lines, According to a study published on the National center for Biotechnology information, fermented red ginseng is a “novel skincare anti-aging ingredient” that “offers increased anti-wrinkle efficacy and whitening efficacy.”

Bee Venom and Propolis
Bees certainly are busy! Not only are they constantly working to produce honey and pollen,they are also responsible for royal jelly, bee venom, beeswax and propolis. While honey has been a long time ingredient used in skincare as a humectant and antibacterial substance for wound heeling, bee venom is one of the newest bee production to be used in sincere. The bee venom works by using its apparent ability to trick skin into thinking it has been stung, which production tightening and plumping effects by relaxing the facial muscles. Propolis is a resin like substance used to seal chambers where bee larvae inhabit and also works as a natural disinfectant Although research is still being done on its benefits, preliminary studies show that it may have anti fungal and antibacterial properties that may be effective against acne. It is also purported to be an antioxidant and is currently being studied as a possible treatment for fighting cancer.

What do you think? Are you willing to lay out the big bucks for the good stuff? Let us know! We love to hear from you!