Tag Archives: Skin

Balancing Your Skin’s pH

Woman floating

If you’re trying to get this “science of skincare” down, you may feel like you are revisiting your high school chemistry class with a slightly more positive attitude. Maybe you can learn something useful about your skin while you’re keeping your brain cells from degenerating. Some of the concepts may even be starting to sound familiar. You vaguely recall the phrase PH being tossed about. Are you wondering what that has to do with your skin? Here’s a little rundown on how it all balances out.

pH Levels and Your Skin
In short, pH is a measure of the acidity of a substance. To provide perspective, on a scale of 1-14, battery acid clocks in at 0, while a level of 14 indicates the most alkaline, or basic substances. Your skin should come in at about 4.5-5.5. The measurement is a little more acidic than basic. The larger percent of acidity helps skin retain moisture and fight bacteria, allergens, wind, and pollutants. Environmental factors and UV light can throw off your skin’s pH resulting in all sorts of reactions, including inflammation, dry skin, and even eczema. To keep skin in its best shape, you should try to make sure you’re keeping that number as close to its recommended PH level as possible.

Soap on hands

Soap Cleansers
Most of us grew up putting our faith in soap. It kept us clean, our mothers were always telling us to use it. Since when did it become the bad guy? The thing about soap is that it has a pH of about 9-11 which is really much too basic for your skin. The most alkaline cleansers are used for heavy duty cleaning; drain pipe cleaners have a pH level of about 14. Look for cleansers that say “pH balanced or “soap free” to make sure your skin is maintaining a healthy level of acidity.

Don’t Over Peel
Most people are results oriented, and peeling products give quick results; however, there can be such a thing as too much of a good thing. Peeling is intended to slough off dead skin, but once the dead skin is gone, you’re removing more than that. If you’re breaking out, or experiencing redness and inflammation, you should probably take it as a sign to slow down. You’re breaking down your skin’s defences.

Woman eating salad

Eat Well
You’re always hearing about how you are what you eat, so it should come as no surprise that it is no different when it comes to your pH level. Since what you consume is filtered through your skin cells when you sweat; sweat has a lot of influence on your pH level. Processed foods tend to be acidic, so you need to make sure your diet has a lot of dark leafy green veggies to keep your skin balanced and protected against breakouts.

Product pH Levels
The good news is that you really don’t have to do much math to keep your pH balanced. It’s not a case of trying to neutralize a breakout caused by a high acid level by using alkaline products; you’re likely to go in the opposite direction. Most of the math has been done for you. Just look for products with the same pH level recommended for your skin, between 4.5 and 5.5. If you want to figure out how much pH is in a product, you an purchase pH testing kits from the drugstore.

We hope you enjoyed your chemistry lesson for today. Let us know what you’re doing to keep your pH in check, Let us hear your comments and suggestions.

5 Common Skin Care Ingredients That Can Cause Allergies

Woman checking face at mirror

Were you the kid in school who could never eat the cookies during snack time because you had a nut allergy? Life is rough for the allergy sensitive. Whenever there is something great that everyone seems to love, it makes you break out in hives or start sneezing uncontrollably. Like skin care products. Just when you find a skincare product that is really working for you, it turns on you, causing you to break out itching and scratching. While little can be done to stop your allergies, there are ways to save some heartache, by avoiding certain products, to begin with. Here are some ingredients to look out for when you’re buying products.

Salicylic Acid
Dendy Engelmen, MD, explains that salicylic acid is, “the same active ingredient in aspirin and three to five percent of the population is sensitive to aspirin too.” If your product contains salicylic acid, you’re probably using it to fight blemishes, but you should know that it’s likely to cause inflammation and hives as well. The allergy sensitive is better off using benzoyl peroxide.

Aluminum
Aluminum is usually found lurking in your antiperspirant or deodorant because it reduces sweating. However, because it is a salt, it can also cause itching, swelling, and redness. Engleman recommends using magnesium oil, which prevents sweating using ninasium chloride, or aluminum-free antiperspirants and deodorants.

Glycolic Acid
It seems that the things about glycolic acid that make it so good for your skin are the same things that make it so bad for your skin. David Bank, MD, explains, “This acid is so small that it’s very good at penetrating into the skin. On the efficacy side, it’s great. But that rapid entry can make it more irritating.” If you’re experiencing redness or drying from glycolic acid, you may want to replace it with lactic acid, which is, “physically larger so it releases more gradually over time.”

Sulfate
Bank clarifies that “When people use the word sulfates, they’re particularly referring to sodium lauryl sulfate. These detergents are found in cleansers and shampoos and can cause redness and dryness on sensitive eczema-prone skin.” For a milder treatment, look for products which are sulfate free or shampoos containing sodium laureth sulfate instead.

Retinol
It may be great for fighting aging, but it’s also pretty good at drying out skin. Bank says, “Retinol still remains the gold standard for anti-aging, reversing sun damage and stimulating collagen, The major drawback is that it can be on the drying and irritating side.” He does add, however, that the unpleasant side effects tend to be more uncomfortable than toxic.

Allergic? Let us know what skin care ingredients you think we should avoid. We love to hear it.

Luxurious Skincare Ingredients That Are Trending Right Now

Woman on bed of flowers

Those of us who have done our homework will know that retinol has often been referred to as the “gold standard in skincare,” but what about gold itself? Could gold be the “gold standard in skincare” or are we talking about apples and oranges here? When it comes to skincare, it is no secret that most women are prepared to pay a king’s ransom for a product that works, and, while there is truth in the saying, “You get what you pay for,” you do need to know what you’re paying for. Let’s look at some skincare ingredients that give new meaning to the words, “pretty penny” to see if they’re truly worth their weight in gold.

Gold
We all know that gold is precious in and of itself, but can it also be useful? As it turns, out, the metal has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that can decrease acne and redness and protect skin from free radicals. Colloidal gold, which is composed of particles of gold suspended in liquid, has been used in injection for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Maybe the term “golden glow” has more to it than we thought.

Pearl in seashell

Pearls
Ever wonder why flawless skin is often referred to as “pearlescent?” While a relatively novel skincare concept in the Western world, pearls have been a long held beauty secret of Asian royalty since ancient times. Crushed pearls were used to give skin a luminous glow during the Ming Dynasty and pearls have been used in traditional Chinese medicine because of their detoxifying and anti-inflammatory abilities. Pearls also have high calcium content and contain trace minerals, amino acids, and conchiolin, a protein that helps restore collagen to skin.

Caviar
Largely popularized by the reported usage of Baerli sturgeon caviar by Angelina Jolie to rid her body of stretch marks resulting from the birth of her twins, fish eggs have been reputed to have beneficial effects on skin. While its effect on stretch marks is a matter of dispute, caviar does contain antioxidants like Omega 3 and Omega 6 fatty acids that can promote production of collagen and prevent cellular inflammation. It also has selenium and potassium, which may increase skin’s elasticity.

Ginseng

Ginseng
Red ginseng is often used in skincare to relieve dryness, brighten dark spots and under eye circles, and reduce wrinkles and fine lines, According to a study published on the National center for Biotechnology information, fermented red ginseng is a “novel skincare anti-aging ingredient” that “offers increased anti-wrinkle efficacy and whitening efficacy.”

Bee Venom and Propolis
Bees certainly are busy! Not only are they constantly working to produce honey and pollen,they are also responsible for royal jelly, bee venom, beeswax and propolis. While honey has been a long time ingredient used in skincare as a humectant and antibacterial substance for wound heeling, bee venom is one of the newest bee production to be used in sincere. The bee venom works by using its apparent ability to trick skin into thinking it has been stung, which production tightening and plumping effects by relaxing the facial muscles. Propolis is a resin like substance used to seal chambers where bee larvae inhabit and also works as a natural disinfectant Although research is still being done on its benefits, preliminary studies show that it may have anti fungal and antibacterial properties that may be effective against acne. It is also purported to be an antioxidant and is currently being studied as a possible treatment for fighting cancer.

What do you think? Are you willing to lay out the big bucks for the good stuff? Let us know! We love to hear from you!

Upgrade Your Skincare Routine With Hyaluronic Acid

Woman at mirror

If you are one of the many searching for the fountain of youth in a bottle, you probably have something in your medicine cabinet with the words “hyaluronic acid” on the label. If so, you’re probably aware that there are other kinds of acids out there than the kind that burns your skin and the kind that blows your mind. Hyaluronic acid is one of the many ingredients to be included in the phenomena known as the “science of skincare.” This may be enough to qualify the ingredient as the worthwhile investment that it is, but it never hurts to do a little private investigating.

What is hyaluronic acid?
Hyaluronic acid is, in fact, a sugar molecule capable of retaining an impressive 500 to 1,000 times its weight in water (Doesn’t sound very comfortable). Our body produces it naturally, but the production slows down with age. When this happens, we may want to seek an outside source. Hyaluronic acid is used in serums and face creams to keep the skin plump, firm, and hydrated. The only problem is that the molecules used in most brands are too large to penetrate the layers of the skin and only offer a temporary fix.

Injectable Hyaluronic Acid
What many users may not know about hyaluronic acid is the fact that the only way for the hyaluronic acid to the deepest layers of the skin is by injecting it. Otherwise, it will still work, but it will sit on the surface of the skin. There it will work to decrease wrinkles, and draw moisture from the air, but the improvements will not be permanent. However, due to recent innovation in the topical use of the product, the effects may soon be able to yield longer lasting results. Intensifiers work around the size of the pores, using a cocktail of ingredients to encourage the skin to produce more of its own hyaluronic acid. Users report a 30 percent increase in hydration, although they do caution that it may take a few weeks before results become apparent.

Woman reading product label

Buying Hyaluronic Acid
When looking to buy products containing hyaluronic acid, you don’t always get what you pay for. Don’t let a high price fool you into thinking you’re buying a superior formula. Instead, as Randy Schueller, cosmetic scientist advises, “Always check the label and make sure hyaluronic acid is one of the first few ingredients.” This is the best way to ensure the dose of the ingredient is strong enough to have an effect. Be aware that hyaluronic acid may also appear on labels as hydrolyzed hyaluronic acid or sodium acetyl hyaluronate.

The Upshot
No matter how big the molecule, you should feel a difference, however short lived. But if you want the good stuff, you need to know where to look.

Have you or do you use hyaluronic acid as part of your routine? Let us know what you think? How permanent are the changes you experienced?

Natural Ingredients To Add To Your Daily Routine

If you subscribe to the long-held belief that ignorance is bliss, it will logically follow that the less ignorant we, as a society become, the less blissful we will be. Case in point: Until not long ago, we were carelessly lying in the sun, eating our McDonald’s, and using doorknobs in doctors’ offices. We now know UV light produces free radicals, our foods are packed with preservatives and artificial ingredients, and just about every surface we touch is swarming with bacteria. What’s next? Our beauty products? According to Dr. Axe, the majority of commercially available beauty products are packed with fragrances, artificial colors, stabilizers and preservatives that can be absorbed through the pores of the skin, leading to a range of potential negative long-term effects on our health, specifically hormone imbalance, and irregular periods. Luckily, there are natural alternatives to ensure your skin remains radiant while your body remains healthy.

Apple cider vinegar

Apple Cider Vinegar
This inexpensive natural skin care product can help to kill pathogens, such as bacteria, and clear skin problems arising from gut issues. Apple cider vinegar was first used by Hippocrates who believed in its anti-fungal properties as a useful treatment for skin sores and ulcerations. Additionally, ACV contains beneficial vitamins, such as potassium and magnesium, which make it an excellent detoxifier when taken internally.

Raw honey

Raw Honey
Raw honey is known to reduce breakouts and scars, boost hydration, help to heal wounds, and fight allergies. Because raw honey is unprocessed, it is able to keep its nutrients intact, unlike most store bought honey. It has been used to heal everything from dandruff to diaper rash to psoriasis and can be used to treat acne when applied to the skin for ten minutes.

Sea salt

Sea Salt
You may have seen this ingredient popping up on food labels lately as a replacement for regular table salt. Sea salt is packed with nutrients like calcium, potassium, sodium, and magnesium which it absorbs from salt water. Luckily, these are the same types of mineral found in our skin, which is why sea salt is so effective in balancing, restoring and protecting our skin. It also contains anti-inflammatory properties for removal of dead skin cells, the balance of oil production, maintenance of skin moisture levels and calming of breakouts.

Avocado

Avocado
A much loved fatty fruit, the avocado contains vitamin A, D, and E, all able to penetrate the skin to soothe sunburn, increase production of collagen and treat age spots. It can be applied externally or eaten to reduce skin inflammation and combined with essential oils or honey directly to skin.

Coconut oil

Coconut Oil
Coconut oil has a plethora of benefits, including the ability to strengthen skin tissue, remove dead skin cells, and protect against sunburn. Research shows that the antibacterial and antioxidant properties of the oil can even fight skin disease and defects in the epidermal barrier. Coconut oil can be used on both skin and hair, to cleanse, moisturize, and heal wounds, and because what we put inside us can effect how we look on the outside, the oil can help keep skin radiant when taken internally to wash away toxins and help with digestive function.

Tea tree oil

Tea Tree Oil
Tea tree oil has been used to combat redness, inflammation, and breakouts on skin for centuries. It provides a mild alternative to harsh acne treatments which can cause side effects and dry skin. Tea tree oil contains anti-fungal, antimicrobial and antibacterial properties and its phytochemicals make it one of the most effective of the skin care essential oils.

What do you think? Are you ready to scrap your serums and creams for avocados and coconuts? Let us know how you weigh in!

The Many Benefits Of Lavender Oil

Lavender oil

Lavender. The word alone has a seductive sound. It is little wonder that this plant should be so commonly associated with passion. Even 15th century England was not too proper to produce the famous nursery rhyme “Lavender Blue,” referring to the maids in the house shucking corn, “Whilst you and I keep the bed warm.” The tonic has additionally been sipped throughout history by maidens hoping to divine the identity of their true loves, placed under pillows in hopes of romance, and stuck under the beds of newlyweds to ensure passion. Furthermore, if that weren’t enough, lavender oil has plenty of more practical uses as well. Lavender oil is extracted from the lavender plant. Its Latin name is Lavare, which means to wash, and is so named for its pleasant aroma. The oil is known for its abilities to relieve pain and tension, disinfect the skin, treat respiratory illness, and boost blood circulation.

Bug Repellant
Although humans may find the scent of the oil attractive, it is quite another story for insects. Apply some on exposed skin to prevent irritating bites from bugs such as midges, moths, and mosquitoes. If you are bitten, go ahead and apply some more. The oil has anti- inflammatory properties that will help to reduce resulting pain and irritation.

Woman sleeping

Sleep
The relaxing qualities of lavender oil can make it a potent treatment for insomnia. Studies on elderly patients point to an increase in sleep regularity when the patient’s regular sleep medication is replaced by a few drops of the oil on their pillows.

Nervous System
The calming scent of lavender essential oil is an excellent tonic for anxiety and nerves, and can thus be useful in treating headaches, depression, migraines, and stress. The aroma has been shown to remove restlessness and increase mental activity, which makes it an effective treatment for insomnia and a way to regulate heart rate. One study demonstrated a noticeable decrease in emotional stress and increase in cognitive function when subjects inhaled lavender and rosemary oils before taking an exam.

Woman touching face

Acne
Maybe one of the reasons lavender oil is known to induce romance is because of how much better it can make you look, Dermatologists and aromatherapists believe it to be one of the most effective oils in acne treatment. Lavender essential oil works on acne by inhibiting the bacteria that cause the infection and helping to regulate the over production of sebum. It can also reduce post acne scarring and increase healing.

Relief of Pain
Lavender oil can be a remedy for pain resulting from sore muscles and aches, rheumatism, sprains, and lumbago. A study on postoperative pain relief showed that the addition of lavender essential oil to the patient’s oxygen supply reduced the amount of pain experienced following surgery.

Digestion
Lavender essential oil can be used a digestive aid, helping to increase food mobility in the intestine. It additionally improves the production of bile and gastric juices, making it an effective form of relief of stomach pain, flatulence, indigestion, colic, diarrhoea, and vomiting.

What do you use lavender for? Tell us why your loving lavender. We love to hear your comments and suggestions.

Five Steps To A Great Skincare Routine

There is nothing new about the “less is more” concept. Even before Susie Faux termed the phrase “capsule wardrobe” in the seventies, people have realized the wisdom of quality over quantity and the freedom derived from having less. So why is it that so many people are obsessed with multi-step beauty routines?

Of course, if you have the time and patience, you’re welcome to spend as much of it on skin care as you like, but, if you don’t, there is nothing wrong with keeping it scaled down. Remember, you own your beauty routine, it doesn’t own you. So, if you believe in keeping it short and sweet, here’s are five steps that will help you maximize while you minimize.

Woman cleansing skin

Cleanse
Cleansing skin is the most basic step in a skin routine. It should be done twice daily, once in the morning and once at night, to give skin time to heal and breath without being clogged by makeup and debris.

Cleansing should be done with clean hands. Begin by wetting skin with warm water to open the pores. Apply a cleanser appropriate to your skin type using upward circular motions. Some products will be more effective if you leave them on for a minute or two to allow penetration. Remove with damp cotton pads or by splashing your face with cold water. (Cold water will close up pores.) Pat dry gently with a clean towel.

Tone
Toning restores your skin’s pH balance, which is usually altered during the cleansing process. This step can also make your skin more resistant to bacteria. Some toners will only restore your skin’s pH, others will kill bacteria, still others may contain an extra ingredient to prevent acne. Choose the one that suits your skin, and, if you have sensitive skin, be sure to use a specially formulated toner.

Apply toner to entire face with a cotton pad, taking care to avoid your eyes. Do not rinse off.

Woman moisturizing

Moisturize
Moisturizing is the most important step in the beauty routine, and should not be omitted, even if your skin is oily. There is quite a variety of moisturizing products, such as gels (oily skin), creams (dry/sensitive skin), and serums (normal/oily skin). Some may contain anti wrinkle, and anti acne agents, others may tint, or tan, skin.

Apply moisturizer to the face and neck, after toner has dried, using a circular motion. You may want to follow up with a separate moisturizer targeted toward preventing swelling and aging in the eye area.

Exfoliate
Once or twice weekly, use an exfoliator to remove dead skin cells. Make sure not to use anything too harsh, which can irritate skin and tear skin cells.

Remove makeup and massage the exfoliator gently into your face using an outward circular motion for about thirty seconds. Remember, gently is the key word here! If you’re using an exfoliating wash cloth, soak it in warm water and rub it in small circles on your face. Be sure to target creases by your nose and other areas on which blackheads tend to develop.

Face mask

Face Mask
Peel off masks are the best option for unclogging pores, and are the best for oily or acne prone skin. Those with dry skin will benefit most from moisturizing masks.

Choose a natural, mild mask. Keep applications down to once a week or less; frequent applications will result in over cleansing your face. You can make your own, in the interest of keeping it natural, or use a store bought one, following directions on the package.

What do you think of the five-step skin routine? Is less more, or is more more? Let us know what you think?

Natural Ingredients That Stimulate Healthy Cell Formation

These days, when the word “cell” is mentioned, most of us are likely to think “phone.” While many of us may argue that cell phones are vital to our well being, there are other kinds of cells that are probably just a little more important. These are the cells in your body; the fundamental units of life form which all your organs and tissues are made.

Like most of our cell phones, the cells of the body are in constant communication with one another, responding to the signals they receive from your environment. If the cells cannot operate efficiently, tissues and organs can breakdown, resulting in a host of health conditions. In order to keep these cells functioning properly you need to keep yourself well nourished. Here are some healthy ingredients you need to ensure that these very important cells continue to serve you well.

whole grains

Whole Grain
Whole foods contain the fullest variety of nutrients, which makes whole grains one of the most complete food sources for healthy cell formation. The three main parts of the whole grain each serve a different purpose, and provide a different complement of vitamins and minerals. The protective bran guards the sprout from sun damage; the germ contains a high level of micronutrients from the vitamin E family, while the endosperm contains the lowest level of nutrients and serves mostly to provide calories for the sprout. While all three parts are used in whole grain food, refined products, such as white bread, use only the endosperm, or starch component of the grain.

Fats and Cell Formation
The fats you eat have a major influence on your cells. As a matter of fact, they become your cell membranes. Unsaturated fats, like the omega-3s in fish and nuts, are needed to give your cell membranes their shape and the ability to communicate with one another. While trans fatty acids, or saturated fats, also become part of your cells membrane, they are less able to respond to signals and can cause cell membranes to become brittle.

Cereals, vegetables, fruits, and grains also have fats to protect cell membrane from damage. These include tocopherals and are found in highest amounts in wheat germ oil, carotenoids, such as beta-carotene in carrots, vitamin C from citrus fruits, and lycopene in tomatoes.

eggs and meat

DNA
DNA is the part of your cell which stores your genetic information, and it is vital that you take steps to make sure its integrity is not compromised. When the structure of DNA breaks down, the body becomes not only unable to produce proteins for proper cell function, but it may cause mutations that lead to cancer. While fats are an integral part of protecting the DNA, it is also important to maintain adequate levels of protein, choline, inositol, carotenoids, and antioxidants, such as vitamins C and E.

Healthy DNA also requires an adequate intakes of vitamin B12 and folate, which are involved with repair and replication of DNA. Eggs, meat, fish and dairy are all rich in vitamin B12, while high levels of folate are found in eggs, grains, and green vegetables.

Organic Foods
Since agricultural chemicals are know to damage the function and structure if cells, organically grown foods are recommended to promote healthy cell formation. Studies show that pesticides can overstimulate enzymes which can be a cause of inflammation, and a contributing factor to psoriasis and atherosclerosis,
Organic foods can also minimize DNA degradation. Test tube studies show that agricultural chemicals can lead to genetic mutations leading to the development of cancer and have a negative effect on the production of energy.

Are you keeping your cells healthy? Let us know what you’re eating to keep your cells in tip top shape!

Foods That Are Killing your Complexion

Woman drinking juice

You look in the mirror, and there it is: a new zit. You do a quick mental inventory of the foods you’ve eaten in the last few days to determine the culprit, but it doesn’t take you long to determine; it’s that candy bar you ate the other day. How you tried to forget about that dietary blunder. You didn’t even list it in your food journal. But now, here it is, getting its revenge in the form of a large pimple that will probably taunt you for the next two weeks.

You know that you are what you eat and your skin is one of the biggest reminders. Although some foods are hard to resist, pimples are a high price to pay. But, forewarned is forearmed. So, in the spirit of forewarning, here are some foods that may be causing those complexion killers.

Canned Soup
Although it may make a cheap, quick lunch, canned soup contains bisphenol and sodium which can make skin retain water, causing it to become dry, swollen, and inflamed. Bone broth is a gut soothing option which can help to heal the stomach lining without making your skin break out in the process.

donuts

Processed Carbohydrates
Processed carbohydrates include all those foods we love like white bread, cereals, and baked goods. Unfortunately, these dietary staples break down and transform into sugar, which is bad news for your health and your skin. Seed and almond flour crackers are low in sugar and high in fiber and may save you from acne woes.

Juice
Another high-sugar bandit, juice is no friend to the acne-prone. Try a high protein smoothie with healthy fats instead.

Canned Tuna
While it may be accessible and cost effective, canned tuna may not be your healthiest seafood option. Dr. Lipman says, “It lacks the nutrients found in wild fish and is often farmed, causing mercury toxicity. ” Canned wild salmon is a safer source of omega-3s and has anti-inflammatory properties.

Woman eating pizza

Cheese made from Cow’s Milk
Pizza eaters be warned. According to Dr. Frank Lipman, MD, “Dairy is a brilliant trigger for skin issues like acne, as all dairy products come from lactating organic cows. Organic cows are filled with cow’s hormones, which can trigger hormonal acne in humans.” If you can, try replacing the dreaded zit inducer with lactose free cashew cheese or nutritional yeast, although they may not work as well as mozzarella on pizza.

Soda
Soda is a veritable cocktail of skin no no’s, from its high sugar level to its chemical content. Soda increases insulin levels and can interfere with the production of healthy bacteria. The result? A plethora of skin issuers ranging from eczema and rosacea to acne. Kombucha is a probiotic rich alternative, which would be a less “inflammatory” option.

Coffee
Caffeine in coffee can dehydrate skin. If you can sacrifice the jolt, consuming hot water with a hint of lemon can hydrate skin and reduce inflammation.

Are there any foods worth suffering zits for? Let us know what you think! And good luck keeping your complexion clear and lovely!

Use These Herbal Aids For Dry Skin

If there is anything to be learned from history, it is safe to say that people have always had a high respect for herbs. Elizabethan herbalist, Nicholas Culpepper credited plants with possessing powers of good (light) and evil (dark). That may explain why Chinese Emperor, and part time herbal enthusiast, Chi’en Nung, while able to identify 365 healing herbs, died after consuming one that turned out to be poisonous.

Despite the occasional mishap, it is safe to say that the herbal remedy has maintained a pretty respectable track record to this day, quite a feat considering how long its history is. Herbals have been credited with easing aches, pains, digestion problems and are also one of the most effective and trusted ingredients in beauty and skin products. If you are looking to give your skin a hydrating boost, here are some of the best (pretested) herbal remedies for dry skin relief.

avocado oil

Avocado Oil
It should be no surprise that a super food makes a super skin treatment. Avocado oil stimulates production of collagen and hydrates skin, and can even be used as a substitute for your nightly serum.

Rosemary Oil
Rosemary oil helps to stimulate cell renewal and gets rid of cells that dull the complexion to reveal new, fresh skin underneath. It can also be used to treat dry, itchy scalp and dandruff. Mix five to seven drops with luke warm water and use it to rinse hair after shampooing to address a flaky scalp.

Lavender Oil
Not only does it smell great, lavender can also relieve itchy tight skin and protect it from UV rays and free radicals which cause premature aging. Apply directly to your face, or put a few drops in your day or night cream.

Pomegranate seed oil

Pomegranate Seed Oil
The antioxidant properties in the pomegranate makes them a great anti-ager, whether you choose to munch or apply topically. The magical seeds can reduce breakdown and increase production of collagen to keep your skin looking firm and useful. Put a drop on your skin after applying moisturizer.

Grapeseed Oil
You’ve probably seen this ingredient being given credit on the labels of anti aging serums and creams. Grapeseed oil has been a proven component in the restoration of collagen and softens find lines to help skin stay firm. “Plus, according to David Colbert, MD, “grape seed oil is high in polyphenols which are antioxidants that can help calm inflammation.” Add two drops to your morning moisturizer to reap its anti aging benefits.

Sunflower Seed Oil
Got dry scaly elbows and knees? Slather some of this vitamin E rich oil on them for some quick hydration.

carrot seed oil

Carrot Seed Oil
Fight age spots with this bunny pleasing option, extracted from the dried seeds of the orange plant. Carrot seed oil can also speed up healing of skin irritations like psoriasis, dermatitis, and eczema.

Olive Oil
Besides being a delicious addition to food, olive oil can also be just the thing to relieve a dry, itchy scalp, due to its anti fungal and antibacterial properties. Ellen Marmur, MD, advises, “To calm either issue, once a week, massage a 1/4 cup of olive oils into your scalp so its evenly saturated. Wait at least 20 minutes, then shampoo and condition. Use the remainder to treat your complexion. Olive oil is rich in vitamins that can help prevent spots anilines caused by sun damage. Put two drops in your favorite moisturizer to boost results.

What herbal treatments work best on your dry skin? Let us know your favorites!