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Don’t Believe These Beauty Myths

Some myths die hard, others, we’re pleased to let go of. The big reveal about pizza and chocolate not causing acne may have been a little easier for many to accept, the one about Santa Claus may have been a little more difficult. However, like it or not, eventually the truth will come out. Here are some of the latest “facts” about beauty that are turning out to be, not so factual. Hopefully, they won’t be too hard to part with.

Myth 1: Skincare Products Should Be Chosen According to Age
We often see skin regimens and care products targeted at certain age groups, however, it is important to make a distinction between age groups and skin types. While there are certain skin issues associated with aging, there is no guarantee that a woman in her 30’s does not face the same concerns as a woman in her 50’s. Clogged pores don’t automatically disappear when you reach 50, and wrinkles can occur on women in their 20’s. The bottom line is, fighting aging should begin as soon as possible. It is never too early to start on a healthy skin regimen.

Myth 2: Hypoallergenic Products Are Best For Sensitive Skin
Hypoallergenic is a term which means that a product is less likely to cause an allergic reaction, and is better for sensitive and allergy prone skin. However, there are no regulations for determining if a product can be labelled as hypoallergenic. Rather than looking for the word, “hypoallergenic” on the label, look at the ingredient label. Fragrance free, gentle ingredients are more friendly to sensitive skin.

vine vera banner Don't Believe These Beauty Myths

Myth 3: Age Spots Are A Part Of Getting Older
The term “age spot’ is something of a misnomer. The brown spots and discoloration come from years of exposure to the elements that lead to visible imperfections in the skin, and can show up at any age. The best skin brightening products are those that contain niacinamide and vitamin C. Plant extracts such as arbutin have also been shown to have skin brightening properties, but none of these ingredients will work without the application of a broad spectrum sun screen. If a sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30 is not applied 365 days a year, the uneven skin tone and spots will not take a turn for the better.

Myth 4: You’ll Outgrow Acne
Unfortunately, acne is not only a rite of passage. Adults up to the age of 60 can get blemishes, and the products that treat them are the same for any age group. The causes of acne are not age related, and the conditions can be triggered at any time. Another common misconception: having clear skin as an adolescents does not exempt you from acne in later life.

Myth 5: Makeup Triggers Acne
There is no research showing a link between makeup and acne, but if you don’t remove makeup completely and correctly, you may run into problems. When you leave traces of makeup on your skin at night, the anti acne products you apply to your face cannot penetrate the pores, which means they are less effective if at all. It is not the makeup itself that triggers acne, but its likelihood to block pores which prevents the acne medication from absorption that pulls the trigger on blemishes.

What beauty myths shocked you? Let us know your favorite busted myth. We love to get your comments.

Signs You’re Allergic To Your Skincare Product

Woman in front of mirror

We all know how difficult it can be to find a skincare product you love. After consigning half your paycheck’s worth of products to the garbage bin, you come upon something that actually works; that anti wrinkle cream that really seems to be making you look younger, that spot treatment that really seems to be getting rid of those spots. And just when you declare yourself an official customer for life, it happens: the itching, the redness, the wheezing, the inflammation – the allergic reaction. Sure, the product did what it said it would, but are you really just trading one problem for another? Here are some signs that you’re allergic to your skincare product and what you can do about it.

Aluminum Compounds
If your armpits are getting red and peeling, it may just be that you’re having an allergic reaction to the aluminum compounds in your antiperspirant, according to Joshua Zeichner, MD, at Mount Sinai Medical Center.

You can try swapping it with a natural deodorant. However, Zeichner says, “They do a fine job of masking odor, but aren’t great at preventing sweating.” If leaky pits are still problem, try a sensitive skin antiperspirant with low levels of aluminum.

Acids
It may not surprise you to note that some of the products designed to get rid of skin cells may be causing more harm than good. Salicylic acid, topical retinoids, and glycol acids all, “can cause skin irritation, dryness, redness, and/or burning if you over-use them, ” says Zeichner.

If you notice a negative reaction to topicals, you may want to consult a dermatologist and follow usage instructions carefully. It may be that you need to start with a lower dosage and gradually build up from there, or decrease usage to every other day or every few days. If you are having an allergic reaction to a glycol peel, you may want to trnon-chemicalal forms of exfoliation, like a gentle scrub or a vitamin C or fruit enzyme peel.

Fragrance
Health researchers at the University of Washington credit the use of synthetic fragrance with the development of skin and respiratory irritation in over 20% of the American population. “And fragrance doesn’t just mean perfume; it’s used in almost every beauty product under the sun, points out Siobhan O’Connor, co author of “No More Dirty Looks.” Fragrances pop up even in products that are labeled “unscented” because companies are known to use fragrance chemicals as masking agents to create neutral “non-scents.”

A word to the wise and fragrance sensitive: avoid products with the word “fragrance”on their label, and look for the term “fragrance-free” instead.

Metallics
Glitter can be a girl’s best friend, but not if she’s allergic to nickel. If you’re allergic to the metal, found in the plating of buttons and snaps and costume jewelry, you may also have an allergic reaction to cobalt, used in personal care products, such as light brown hair dyes and antiperspirants. Aluminum, lead, and chromium are other metals to be wary of.

Do a patch test with any cosmetic or mineral makeup which is likely to contain metallic elements to be sure it will not cause a reaction when you apply it to your face.

Emollients
Perry Romanowski, cosmetic chemist says, “Emollients are ingredients designed to feel good on your skin, but any go them cause breakouts, especially for acne-prone skin. Coconut butter, lanolin, cocoa butter, iso-stearyl isostearate, isopropyl palmitate and myristyl lactate are all emollients to be put on the “use with caution” list.

If you’re breakout-prone, use a noncomedogenic, water-based moisturizer to keep skin hydrated without clogging your pores.

Are you allergic to your skin care product? Let us know how you prevent breakouts and what you use to replace the cosmetics that cause you irritation.

The Best Oils for Your Skin Type

Essential oil

Even though oils have been used for centuries as skincare, it’s only been in the last few years that oils have become super mainstream and widely available. If you’ve been hesitant to try oils in the past, or if you’ve tried an oil and been less than impressed with the results, this post is for you. As with any other skincare product, different facial oils suit different skin types and our guide below helps you to find the oils that are best suited for your specific skin type.

Acne-Prone
While acne-prone skin often is oily, this isn’t always the case. You may have sensitive or dry skin and still experience acne. Putting oil on a face suffering from breakouts may seem a bit scary, but there are oils available that will soothe and help reduce your breakouts. One of the determining factors in whether or not an oil will benefit acne-prone skin is the ratio of oleic acid and linoleic acid. Oleic acid is a monounsaturated fat, or omega-9 fatty acid while linoleic acid is unsaturated fat, or omega-6 fatty acid. An abstract for a study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology states, “acne patients have also been shown to have low levels of linoleic acid in their skin surface lipids.” Sebum produced by your oil glands is largely oleic acid, so using an oil high in linoleic acid helps balance your skin. Oils that work best for acne-prone skin include hemp seed oil, rosehip seed oil, grape seed oil, evening primrose oil and safflower oil.

Hemp seed oil.

Oily Skin
Putting oil on oily skin seems like a bad idea, but as you learned above, the sebum from your pores is completely different than plant oils. When people have oily skin, the tendency is to use harsh products like exfoliators and toners with alcohol, because at first these seem to remove oil from the skin. The problem with using these types of products is that you are damaging your skin’s lipid barrier, which works to keep good things like moisture in and harmful pollutants out. When you damage the lipid barrier, your skin senses it is imbalanced and it needs more moisture, and it will attempt to moisturize itself by producing more sebum. So, the harsher products can actually not only be ineffective, but they do the exact opposite of what you’re looking for them to do. Pure plant oils help to repair and maintain the lipid barrier of your skin. Oils that tend to work well for oily skin are hemp oil, rosehip seed oil, evening primrose oil, jojoba oil and avocado oil.

Dry Skin
When it comes to dry skin you want an oil that will really penetrate and add moisture to your skin. Oils like rosehip seed and hemp seed oil are relatively dry oils and they may be a bit too drying for skin that is naturally dry. Dry skin needs oils that have a good blend of omega fatty acids including omega-3, omega-6 and omega-9 fatty acids. If you have dry skin you also need an oil that is going to hydrate your face for hours at a time and that will help your skin to retain moisture. Oils that benefit dry skin include aloe vera oil, argan oil, olive oil, grape seed oil and vitamin E oil.

Aloe vera oil.

Normal and Combination Skin
Combination skin commonly features an oily T-zone area and dry skin elsewhere on the face and oils are particularly great for combination skin because they help balance your skin. Normal skin is generally fairly balanced on its own, so your facial oil will be more for hydration than about making sure that everything is evened out on your skin. Oils that work really well for normal and combination skin are grape seed oil, tamanu oil, carrot seed oil and aloe vera oil.

The idea of oil on your face may still scare you, but if you find the right oil, you will never look back when it comes to moisturizing your skin. Oils are available at a wide variety of price points, but it is worth noting that sometimes you do get what you pay for. When choosing your facial oil, you want to be sure that it is as natural and organic as possible, which usually means looking for an oil that is unrefined and cold-pressed. Oils that are refined are less pure and are more likely to include undesirable additives. Next time you’re looking for a moisturizer, reference this guide to find the oil that will work best for you.