Tag Archives: Salicylic Acid

5 Common Skin Care Ingredients That Can Cause Allergies

Woman checking face at mirror

Were you the kid in school who could never eat the cookies during snack time because you had a nut allergy? Life is rough for the allergy sensitive. Whenever there is something great that everyone seems to love, it makes you break out in hives or start sneezing uncontrollably. Like skin care products. Just when you find a skincare product that is really working for you, it turns on you, causing you to break out itching and scratching. While little can be done to stop your allergies, there are ways to save some heartache, by avoiding certain products, to begin with. Here are some ingredients to look out for when you’re buying products.

Salicylic Acid
Dendy Engelmen, MD, explains that salicylic acid is, “the same active ingredient in aspirin and three to five percent of the population is sensitive to aspirin too.” If your product contains salicylic acid, you’re probably using it to fight blemishes, but you should know that it’s likely to cause inflammation and hives as well. The allergy sensitive is better off using benzoyl peroxide.

Aluminum
Aluminum is usually found lurking in your antiperspirant or deodorant because it reduces sweating. However, because it is a salt, it can also cause itching, swelling, and redness. Engleman recommends using magnesium oil, which prevents sweating using ninasium chloride, or aluminum-free antiperspirants and deodorants.

Glycolic Acid
It seems that the things about glycolic acid that make it so good for your skin are the same things that make it so bad for your skin. David Bank, MD, explains, “This acid is so small that it’s very good at penetrating into the skin. On the efficacy side, it’s great. But that rapid entry can make it more irritating.” If you’re experiencing redness or drying from glycolic acid, you may want to replace it with lactic acid, which is, “physically larger so it releases more gradually over time.”

Sulfate
Bank clarifies that “When people use the word sulfates, they’re particularly referring to sodium lauryl sulfate. These detergents are found in cleansers and shampoos and can cause redness and dryness on sensitive eczema-prone skin.” For a milder treatment, look for products which are sulfate free or shampoos containing sodium laureth sulfate instead.

Retinol
It may be great for fighting aging, but it’s also pretty good at drying out skin. Bank says, “Retinol still remains the gold standard for anti-aging, reversing sun damage and stimulating collagen, The major drawback is that it can be on the drying and irritating side.” He does add, however, that the unpleasant side effects tend to be more uncomfortable than toxic.

Allergic? Let us know what skin care ingredients you think we should avoid. We love to hear it.

Skin Care Ingredients Pregnant Women Should Avoid

So you’re pregnant. Your husband and your friends keep telling you you’ve never looked better in your life, but you sure don’t feel it today. Your ankles are swollen, you have a headache, and all you see when you look down is your stomach. You know exactly what you need! A little pampering. Nothing like a nice spa session to make you feel like the goddess you are. But wait! Before you apply that mask, there are a few things you should know about the ingredients in the products you may be about to apply.

Pregnant woman in front of the mirror

Retin-A, Retinol, Retinyl Palmate
The FDA categorizes ingredients according to letters of the alphabet: A, B, C, D, and X. Usually, only A and B categorized products are considered safe for pregnancy. Retin-A, retinol. and retinyl palmate all lie in the C category which means it can present a risk to the fetus. Although vitamin A is an important vitamin for fetal development, Albert Sassoon, MD, an ob-gyn says, “getting too much can cause serious birth defects and liver toxicity.” While Retin-A is usually associated with prescription skin care, women should be aware that vitamin A derivatives are also present in many over the counter formulas as well.

Benzoyl Peroxide
Even though pregnancy may call for the occasional zit zapping, benzoyl peroxide also falls into category C, indicating possible fetal risk.

Woman applying oil to pregnant belly

Essential Oils
Essential oils are not subject to assessment by the FDA and are usually marketed as safe for use in beauty products. However, according to Dr. Sassoon, “Often they have 50 times the concentration used in a cup of tea and can be harmful even in a non-pregnancy state.” The most commonly used oils warranting cause for alarm are rosemary and tea tree oil.

According to Dr. Macrene Alexiades-Armenakas, MD, and dermatologist, “Tea tree oil is very potent and toxic when ingested. Its adverse effects include dermatitis, drug reactions, a blistering disease called linear IgA and estrogenic effects.” which may be to blame for premature contractions. Rosemary oil, meanwhile, is known to, “raise blood pressure and cause uterine contractions at high doses,” adds the doctor.

Woman buying product

Salicylic Acid
This category C acne fighter may be hard to avoid. But, as Dandy Engelman, MD, and dermatologist says,”When you’re pregnant, you have to seek out the purer products–the ones that feature just one of the acids that are approved. Lactic, mandelic, and glycol acids are all considered safe for pregnant women looking for some exfoliating action.

Hydroquinone
Although this may be tempting to use when pregnancy causes melanoma or dark spots, it falls into the C category.

Tazorac and Accutane
Both these vitamin A-derived product are prescription only and fall into category X: known to cause defects in birth.

What safe products do you use to soothe skin while you’re pregnant? Let us know what the modern pregnant lady is using to keep herself and her baby safe.

What Makes A Product Noncomedogenic?

Noncomedogenic. N-O-N-C-O-M-E-D-O-G-E-N-I-C. Noncomedogenic. It sounds like the word that stumped the runner up in the fourth grade spelling bee. If you’ve been hearing this word used a lot lately in the cosmetic industry and thinking it sounds impressive, its meant to. But is it, really? Let’s break it down.

Woman squeezing pimple

A comedo is the mildest form of acne, otherwise known as a pimple, whitehead, or blackhead. So technically you could say, “Wow, that’s a rather large comedo on your face.” as a more polite way of saying, “Wow, that’s a really big zit you have.” Non, of course means without, hence, noncomedogenic, when applied to a skin cleanser essentially means the product does not clog pores and will break down excess oils on your skin without stripping necessary moisture.

What Does “Noncomedogenic” Mean?
Although the term “noncomedogenic” sounds scientific, the truth is that the effectiveness of noncomedogenic products has not been proven in clinical trials, nor has it been tested by the FDA. This is not, however, to say that such products are without merit; in fact, there is some evidence that non comedic products can reduce acne. There is, after all, proof that blocked pores can produce acne, and therefore, a product preventing occlusion of pores, may help prevent it. However, some forms of acne may be a result of other causes, such as a high presence of bacteria on the skin, and, in these cases, noncomedogenic goods would not have much effect.

In other instances, products are labelled noncomedogenic, but, in fact can cause skin rashes an irritation.

Woman cleaning face

Chemistry of Noncomedogenic Products
Noncomedogenic cleanser usually contain benzoyl peroxide, sulfur or salicylic acid. Some have ingredients to treat acne, and others are simply formulated to not aggravate pimples and clog pores.

Benzoyl peroxyde kills bacteria which causes acne and does not produce oil on the skin. Salicylic acid does not kill bacteria, but does unclog pores without creating additional oil. It also dissolves oil in the hair follicles. Sulfur washes away dead skin cells and excess oil and is also believed to be able to break down blackheads and whiteheads.

Pros and Cons Of Noncomedogenic Cleansers
Noncomedogenic. How bad could it be, right? Anything purported not to clog pores, couldn’t be too bad, right? Well, you be the judge.

Benzoyl Peroxide
If you’ve ever used benzoyl peroxide to treat acne, you probably found it to be effective. However, you will need to use it for a few weeks before you see results, and, if you discontinue use, the acne will return. Also, while you can combat the drying effects of benzoyl peroxide on skin with moisturizer, other side effects are not so easy to deal with. Itching, rashes, burning, and swelling have all been associated with the use of benzoyl peroxide and are best handled professionally.

Woman checking skin

Salicylic Acid
Like benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid requires continuous use to see results, as pores will clog up again when the skin is no longer receiving treatment. Although it can cause irritation and stinging, it is usually mild enough to work without causing serious side effects.

Sulfur
Sulfur has very few side effects, if any, and, although some may find the smell disagreeable, the odor is usually not detectable when mixed with other ingredients.

What do you think of noncomedogenic products? Does the term reassure you? Let us know!

Battling Adult Acne

  Women examining acne on her face.

Most of us talk about how we would like to turn back the clock.  Sure, we would all like to look a bit  younger, but there are definitely some things about youth that we are happy to see the back of that denim jacket with the heavy metal patches on it that you wore until it rotted, the self-administered buzz cut, the experiments with green hair dye, and acne.  Yes, if there is anything to be glad about when it comes to aging, it would have to be the end of acne.  But, what if you find yourself having graduated to  adulthood when……THEY’RE BACK! Just when you thought you zapped, squeezed and hid your last pimple, white or black head, they’re back and badder than ever.

Why?

Hormones
Teens are not the only ones whose hormones are aflutter.  According to dermatologist Julia Tzu, MD of Wall Street Dermatology says,”Fluctuation in hormones, such as before one’s menstrual cycle, is the main cause.” Hormonal acne is identifiable by a painful outbreak around the chin neck and back and may occur before your menstrual cycle. High-stress levels can also contribute to hormonal imbalance.  When the stress hormone, cortisol, is released by the body, it is often accompanied by testosterone, a male hormone which leads to the production of more oil, ultimately resulting in more outbreaks.

Using the Wrong Products
If you are prone to breakouts, you should be using products that will not clog your pores. DR. Neal Schultz, of Beauty RX Skincare, suggest looking  for  the words “oil-free”, “non-comedogenic” or “water -based” on the label.

Overcleansing
 Dr.  Rebecca Kazin, MD of the John Hopkins Department of Dermatology says cleansing more than twice a day is too much and can just dry out skin “which can cause it to produce more oil to overcompensate.  Grainy and gritty cleansers  that rub your skin can similarly promote acne.    Try switching to a gentle detoxifying gel cleanser and two is the magic number.

Food
Many of us have heard that there is a direct relationship between chocolate, greasy food and acne, but. before you put down that Hershey’s bar, there is no statistic proof of any of this.  However, you would be well advised to avoid iodine, found in shellfish and greens like kelp and spinach.  Sugary food can also be a culprit.  By raising your insulin level, sugary foods can boost oil- triggering hormones, like testosterone.

Treatment Ingredients

Salicylic Acid
Also known as beta hydroxy acid, salicylic acid exfoliates gently to unclog pores.  It is go-to in anti-acne products and can be found in most OTC cleansers and spot treatments and is mild enough to use on your whole face.

Benzoyl Peroxide
This stuff kills acne bacteria whole exfoliating the pores but stick to spot treatment for this one.  It has been known to make skin irritated and should not be used all over the face.

Glycolic Acid
If you are facing the acne meets wrinkles stages, this may be just the thing. It removes dead skin cells on the surface and stimulates the collagen and  hyaluronic acid, improving skin’s texture on the whole.

Retinol
Another godsend for the acne meets wrinkles crowd.  It is one of the most effective treatments for acne and also has collagen building properties, but , be aware, can be too harsh for those with sensitive skin so try testing it on  a small spot on your skin before you commit to it.

Exfoliate
Probably the best thing you can do to fight acne is exfoliated and the best way to so it is with glycol acid.  A glycol cleanser is helpful, but exfoliating pads and serums that really soak your skin are more effective.

Keep Spot Treatment on Hand
As soon as you feel that zit waiting to burst our, zap it with some benzoyl peroxide to start killing bacteria immediately.  Try to look for a gentle formula with soothing ingredients  for adult skin.

In closing, while these treatments are all effective, keep in mind that hormones are some pretty powerful players.  If topical treatment isn’t enough, talk to your doctor.  He may have the best advice on the best course of action.

Best Ingredients to Deep Clean 2015 Away

Even the best of us can slip up and commit some serious skin sins and now is the time to get rid of those 2015 facial care mistakes, mishaps or neglect. If you haven’t already, begin a skin care routine that consists of a cleanser, toner (if necessary), sunscreen and moisturizer because this will go a long way in keeping your skin healthy. However, if you’ve got a little deep cleaning to do, the following skin care ingredients work wonders at really drawing out and ridding your skin of impurities, toxins, dead skin cells and other debris.

Salicylic Acid

Salicylic Acid
You may be familiar with salicylic acid because it is frequently used as a treatment for acne, but you can still benefit from this deep cleaning ingredient if you have a clear complexion. Salicylic acid exfoliates your skin by gently removing excess skin. When you topically apply salicylic acid, your uppermost layer of skin swells, then softens and finally peels and removes dead skin cells. Alpha-hydroxy acids work in a similar way, but salicylic (or beta-hydroxy acid) is able to penetrate your pores thus unclogging them.

Charcoal.

Charcoal
Charcoal may be one of the last things you would associate with skin care, but activated charcoal is becoming more and more popular as a deep cleansing ingredient. Activated charcoal has the ability to draw bacteria, poisons, dirt, chemicals and other micro-particles from the pores to the surface of the skin. Charcoal masks have been used for a long time to deep clean the skin because it is so effective at drawing out impurities. Activated charcoal can absorb thousands of times its mass in impurities and harmful substances. When you need a super deep clean, try an activated charcoal mask or use an activated charcoal cleanser a few times each week.

Glycolic Acid
Glycolic acid is part of a group of acids known as alpha-hydroxy acids which are made from cane sugar. When it comes to deep cleaning pores, glycolic acid has the smallest molecules among alpha-hydroxy acids so it is easy to deeply penetrate the skin and treat blackheads, acne, oiliness, dull skin and fine lines. Glycolic acid reacts with the surface layer of your skin and breaks down the skin by dissolving sebum and other substances that work to hold the skin together. This acid is used frequently to treat acne, minimize pore size, reduce fine lines and wrinkles and increase cell turnover to reveal younger skin. Glycolic acid is suitable for long-term use and the longer you use it, the better the results will be.

Benzoyl Peroxide

Benzoyl Peroxide
Benzoyl peroxide is another skin care ingredient used in the treatment of acne because it is such an effective cleansing agent. Your pores become clogged in part due to excess oil production that becomes trapped which prevents dead skin cells from exfoliating and sloughing away from the skin and pores in a normal manner. Benzoyl peroxide is able to significantly decrease oil production, allowing your pores to unclog and clear.

These ingredients truly are remarkable when you need a deep clean, but it is important to keep in mind that some concentrations of these ingredients may irritate your skin initially. For instance, your skin will need time to acclimate to glycolic acid, but once it does the deep cleaning results will be impressive. Deep cleaning ingredients are useful can really take your regular cleansing routine to the next level and provide you with clearer, healthier skin.

Ingredients to Help With Dry, Flaky Skin

Dry, flaky skin is the last accessory you want for your holiday parties but when the temperature drops your skin often reacts by losing moisture. There is less moisture in the air and you’re constantly going in between extreme temperatures from hot to cold and back again. Even if you don’t have dry skin to begin with you, you may find yourself experiencing rough, flaky patches of skin. The following four ingredients hydrate, exfoliate and keep your skin looking smooth and healthy.

Woman enjoying milk bath

AHA/ BHA
Exfoliating your skin may be the last thing on your mind when you are experiencing flaky skin, but it is important to do so. Scrubs can be too harsh on dry skin, but using gentle alpha hydroxy acids (AHAs) or beta hydroxy acid (BHA) exfoliates your skin without being too rough. Two great AHAs for dry and flaky skin are glycolic and lactic acids. Glycolic acid is derived from sugar cane and has a bit more potency than lactic acid. Lactic acid can come from plant sources, but most commonly it is a by-product of sour milk. Both of these acids reduce the bonds that hold dead skin cells to your skin, but glycolic acid is a smaller molecule, which means that it can penetrate your skin more deeply and help stimulate collagen production. Salicylic acid, or BHA, is another chemical exfoliant that encourages cell turnover and regeneration and is typically suggested for those with oily or acne-prone skin.

Hyaluronic Acid
Like glycerin, hyaluronic acid is a humectant that draws moisture from the air to your face. Hyaluronic acid is one of the greatest hydrating ingredients because it can hold roughly 1,000 times its weight in water. Like glycerin, hyaluronic acid adds moisture while also preventing loss of hydration by enhancing your skin’s barrier function. Hyaluronic acid not only helps your skin feel more hydrated, but it makes your skin appear more plump and supple.

Glycerin soap.

Glycerin
Glycerin is a superstar for skin that is dry or flaking because it is able to attract moisture to your skin and keep it there. Glycerin hydrates your skin in addition to filling in any gaps in your skin’s barrier, through which moisture can leave your skin. This barrier serves as protection not only against future moisture loss, but also to keep environmental pollutants or irritants from damaging your skin.

Squalane
Squalane is an oil that occurs naturally in your body and is also present in the livers of certain sharks and olive oil. Although squalane is produced by your body, the amount produced slows as you age with a significant drop occurring after age thirty. Squalane is thought to be particularly beneficial for restoring your skin’s proper balance of oils and moisture because it creates a barrier between your skin and the environment, keeping good things in while keeping bad things out. This oil does not have the traditional oily feel and is non-comedogenic, meaning that it won’t clog your pores. Squalane is non-irritating, making it safe for sensitive skin, but it also works well for acne-prone skin as it is thought to have antibacterial properties and can help soothe redness and inflammation while protecting against peeling and flaking.

While dry, flaky skin in the winter is a common occurrence, it is still incredibly frustrating to deal with. A consistent skin-care routine that uses a combination of hydrating ingredients is your best defense against problematic winter skin. Our four favorite skin-care ingredients for dry, flakey skin work to remove dead skin, add hydration and lock moisture into your skin.

Skin Care Ingredients to be Thankful For

Clear, glowing, healthy skin is something that you should definitely give thanks for. Most of us are in constant pursuit of younger looking, healthier skin and there are some skin care ingredients that are superior to others. We’ve listed our four favorite skin care ingredients and why you should be thankful for them.

Hyaluronic Acid formula

Hyaluronic Acid
You can’t go to any skin care or beauty blog without reading something about hyaluronic acid. While some skin care ingredients are just hype, hyaluronic acid deserves every bit of praise that it gets. Hyaluronic acid is a substance that occurs naturally in your body that is responsible for cell renewal and maintaining skin’s elasticity and moisture levels. When you apply hyaluronic acid topically, this amazing skin care ingredient creates a moisture barrier for your skin. In doing so, hyaluronic acid “traps” moisture into your skin, and the hyaluronic acid molecule can hold up to 1,000 times its own weight in water. In addition to major moisture, hyaluronic acid makes your skin smoother and helps diminish the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles by plumping the skin up.

Retinol
When it comes to anti-aging, retinol truly is one of the best skin care ingredients you can use. Retinol is a vitamin A derivative that fights fine lines, wrinkles, sun spots, dullness, sagging skin and can help with acne. This powerhouse works by increasing the rate of cell turnover while also gently exfoliating to get rid of any dry, dead cells on the surface of your skin. Retinol also stimulates cellular repair deep in your skin, which helps boost your levels of collagen and elastin. When using retinol, be sure to look for packaging that is airtight and opaque, or very dark because air and light can degrade retinol making it far less effective.

Red wine

Resveratrol
It’s not secret that we absolutely adore resveratrol as a skin care ingredient, but there are so many great reasons for our love affair with this potent antioxidant. Resveratrol’s antioxidant power fights against oxidative damage and helps repair old damage from free radicals. This protection against free radical damage is essential for young, healthy looking skin because free radicals actually damage collagen and they activate an enzyme that breaks down the collagen and elastin in your skin. Resveratrol also has anti-inflammatory properties so your complexion looks even and radiant.

AHA/ BHA
Alpha-hydroxy acids are organic acids that are typically derived from sugar cane, milk and apples and pears. Sugar cane is responsible for glycolic acid, milk for lactic acid and apples and pears for malic acid. These acids work on the surface layer of your skin to gently exfoliate and brighten dead, dull skin. BHA refers to salicylic acid, which is derived from plant sources. Salicylic acid also is responsible for gentle exfoliation, but it penetrates far more deeply than AHAs do. BHA actually gets down into your pores to clear them of oil, dead skin cells and other debris. AHAs are most frequently used by those with drier skin while BHA is used commonly among those with oily or acne-prone skin.

Quality ingredients equal quality skin and these ingredients are truly skin care superstars. Using products that contain these amazing ingredients, like our Vine Vera Collection skin care, will help you to achieve the healthiest, most radiant skin possible and that’s something you should certainly give thanks for.

Ingredients to Detox Your Skin

The skin is your body’s largest organ. Some people feel that using skincare products to soothe, repair and heal your skin is merely vanity. However, this is really untrue. Your skin is a reflection of how you treat your body, not just a reflection of the products you choose. A healthy diet in conjunction with proper skin care can dramatically change the appearance of your skin. Just as you need to detox your inner organs every now and then, you need to detox your skin as well. Drinking detox water, eating foods that help remove toxins like cucumbers or lemon will definitely play a large role in the detox of your skin. To achieve maximum results, look for products with the following ingredients.

Salicylic acid chemical formula.

Salicylic Acid
This popular exfoliant and acne treatment is one that you may want to look for when you are trying to detoxify your skin and restore it to health. Salicylic acid goes beyond cleaning the surface of your skin, it penetrates the pores. Once inside the pore, salicylic acid clears away accumulated dead skin cells, dirt and any other debris. You can find salicylic acid in facial and body cleansers, toners and astringents, moisturizers and other treatment products.

Citrus fruits.

Vitamin C
Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant that contains tons of skin benefits. Damaged skin needs extra attention and ascorbic acid, the most commonly used form of vitamin C in skincare and beauty products, helps repair your skin. Vitamin C is an essential part of your body’s collagen production process. Collagen is what gives your skin its elasticity and firmness. In addition to collagen production, vitamin C helps your skin to naturally heal itself, which damaged skin requiring a detox, needs.

Chamomile flowers and tea.

Chamomile Extract
Chamomile is a common staple for soothing your body whether you drink chamomile tea for a sore throat or use a skincare product that contains chamomile extract to soothe your skin. Chamomile contains flavanoids, plant derivatives that have antioxidant properties, and with other ingredients, and increases blood flow to the skin. Additionally, chamomile acts as an anti-inflammatory providing relief to irritated, damaged skin.

Green tea.

Green Tea
There are tons of skincare products available that make use of the amazing antioxidant power of green tea. Not only can you use green tea contained in products, you can also brew your own green tea and use it directly on the skin. The tannic acid in green tea is antibacterial and when applied topically it helps to draw impurities from your skin.

Just as a body detox clears out toxins, so does a skin detox. The use of these ingredients helps to deeply cleanse your face and repair any damage that has been done. You don’t have to detox your skin all the time, but an easy way to do so is by using a detoxifying mask once a week. For even better skin detox results, pair your skin detox with a body detox. Mix a pitcher of your favorite detox water to clear toxins from the inside out.

Benzoyl Peroxide vs Salicylic Acid

You can spot conceal the occasional small blemish, but what happens when your face is effected by full-blown acne? Many have struggled with acne at some point in their lives and the common misconception is that acne is something you will grow out of. Acne can affect anyone at any age for a large variety of reasons. Some face hormonal acne while others may have painful cystic acne. If you are taking the fight against acne into your own hands, you probably already know the two major over-the-counter medications used in acne treatment:  benzoyl peroxide and salicylic acid. However, what you may not know is which medication is the correct one for your face. Vine Vera Skincare did some digging to discover how each of these acne medications work and how to tell which one is right for your skin.

Benzoyl Peroxide chemical formula

Benzoyl Peroxide
Benzoyl peroxide is an antibacterial and a keratolytic, meaning that it dissolves keratin. Acne can be caused by a bacteria, P. acnes bacteria, which can not survive in environments that are oxygen rich. When benzoyl peroxide makes contact with your skin, it transforms into oxygen and benzoic acid. The oxygen attacks and destroys bacteria causing acne while benzoic acid makes skin dry and peel. As the skin becomes dry and peels, the skin is exfoliated and the plugs of dead skin cells are removed from your pores. Benzoyl peroxide can be incredibly powerful, which may irritate sensitive skin and cause redness, dryness or skin flaking.

Benzoyl peroxide is sold in a variety of concentrations, the highest being 10%. However, studies have shown that the 2.5% concentration of benzoyl peroxide is just as effective as a 10% benzoyl peroxide treatment and the 2.5% concentration will be less harsh on the skin than a higher level of benzoyl peroxide. Generally, benzoyl peroxide is most beneficial for people struggling with whiteheads. Benzoyl peroxide should be avoided by those with extremely sensitive or already dry skin.

Salicylic acid chemical formula.

Salicylic Acid
Salicylic acid is a beta hydroxy acid (BHA) produced from the bark of willow trees. Unlike benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid does not kill any bacteria. On the skin, salicylic acid corrects any abnormal shedding of skin cells and penetrates deeply to unclog pores and exfoliate the skin. Salicylic acid is also an anti-inflammatory, meaning that it can be good for reducing redness. Salicylic acid helps remove debris from pores and often provides less irritation than benzoyl peroxide.

Concentrations ranging from .5% to 2% are the most commonly used in salicylic acid acne products. Often, salicylic acids is most effective for those who have issues with blackheads and spots of inflammation. Salicylic acid is generally used by those with mild to moderate acne, oily or red skin and tends to cause much less irritation or dryness than benzoyl peroxide

Both benzoyl peroxide and salicylic acid are both effective acne treatments, though each works in its own unique way. These acne fighters are available in a large assortment of skincare products from spot care creams or gels to cleansers and moisturizers. It is important to remember that both benzoyl peroxide and salicylic acid must be used continually, even after acne has cleared up. Discontinuing the use of these products will result in the return of acne. If you are still on the fence about whether benzoyl peroxide or salicylic acid is best for you, or if you suffer from severe acne, it’s a good idea to head to your doctor or dermatologist to find out which medication will be most beneficial to your problem.

Top Ingredients for Oily Skin

Woman with oily skin

While it can be difficult to determine combination or dry skin, oily skin is pretty obvious to those who have it because it’s pretty easy to see, and feel, the oil that is produced by your pores. Those with oily skin often experience:

  • Dull complexion
  • Shiny complexion
  • Enlarged pores
  • Blackheads or other blemishes

However, what is not always obvious is how best to treat the excess oil production. Using the strongest, harshest products you can find will only result in further damage (and more oil), so you want to be sure you select products that really are targeted for the oily skin concerns you have. Luckily, Vine Vera has you covered. We investigated what skin care ingredients provide the most benefits for those with oily skin and the top three are listed below.

Hyaluronic Acid
Hyaluronic acid truly is a skincare superstar. If you checked out our last post, we discussed how hyaluronic acid is one of the most beneficial ingredients in caring for dry skin. So it would seem a bit odd to have the same ingredient listed for oily skin, but there’s a reason this skincare ingredient comes with hype. Because hyaluronic acid moisturizers in a different way, and without the heaviness, than traditional moisturizers. Hyaluronic acid attracts moisture to the skin and holds it there for long periods of time and it is important to make sure that you hydrate oily skin because other products you use for oily skin may take away some moisture.

Salicylic acid.

Salicylic Acid
Salicylic acid is a type of beta hydroxy acid that aids skin in exfoliation. If you have oily skin, exfoliation is super important because oily skin tends to have a thick layer of dead skin cells and thick pore lining. Regular exfoliation removes these dead skin cells and other debris from your face and unclogs your pores. The reason that salicylic acid is the best exfoliant for oily skin types is that it works not only on the surface of your skin, but also deep down into your pores helping to remove any impurities. It is important to note that while regular exfoliation is a crucial part of skincare for oily skin, it is not a good idea to use a harsh scrub frequently. Doing so results in damage to your skin and over-drying of your skin, which leads to an increase in oil production to make up for the moisture loss. A gentle, BHA exfoliant in gel or liquid form is a great way to exfoliate your pores daily (or as often as you prefer) without being too harsh on the skin. If you’re new to using chemical exfoliants or salicylic acid, start slowly to avoid irritation.

Niacinamide
Also known as B3 and nicotinic acid, niacinamide is a cell-communicating ingredient that stimulates the production of collagen and improves the skin’s barrier function. However, the reason that niacinamide is beneficial to those with oily skin is that recent studies suggest that niacinamide is that it actually absorbs sebum. When your skin is oily it produces more sebum, or oil, than necessary and the result is a shiny, oily face. Using a skin care product that contains niacinamide may help absorb excess sebum keeping your face a bit more matte.

In addition to being on the lookout for these three ingredients, it’s a good idea to stay away from products with oil or heavy moisturizers like petroleum. Generally, products that are good for oily skin will include an “oil free” claim somewhere on the product or the packaging. Remember to cleanse, tone (if you use a toner), exfoliate and moisturize oily skin. It can be tempting to skip a moisturizer, but once you find one with the right ingredients, you’ll love how great your skin looks. A regular cleansing routine that incorporates key products will leave you with healthier, smoother looking skin.