Tag Archives: Peanut Butter

vine vera banner presents Quit Peanut Butter For Better Skin

Quit Peanut Butter For Better Skin

Sometimes, life is cruel. We grow up eating the peanut butter and jelly sandwiches mom packs for lunch, believing it is keeping us healthy. Then someone comes along and makes Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups, and we believe we have discovered nirvana. A literal peanut butter explosion ensues. We begin to invent new places to put this delicious spread. Peanut butter shows up in ice cream, in pretzels, as fillings in donuts, in cereals, on the ends of celery and carrot sticks it’s a veritable peanut butter breakout; but could the peanut butter breakout be responsible for the breakouts on your skin? New evidence shows a link between peanut butter and acne. Read on if you can bear it.

Omega -6 Fatty Acids
Aren’t these supposed to be good for you? Here’s the breakdown. You may know from looking at the label that peanut butter has a high fat content. Two tablespoons pack a whopping 16 grams. While most of that fat is mono saturated, 31% of it is polyunsaturated, which means it can trigger acne.
Omega-6 fats can cause inflammation. That means that when you get a clogged poor, a sebaceous gland could burst, which will cause your immune system to respond to what it perceives as an internal wound. When your body has an overload of omega-6 it has difficulty fighting inflammation, and that can make for some pimples that can stick around for a while. Try balancing omega-6’s with omega-3s to keep acne problems from becoming chronic/

Peanut Agglutinin
While it may sound like what a person turns into after eating too many peanuts, peanut agglutinins are lectins found in peanuts that can cause digestive problems. After eating, peanut agglutinin enters the blood stream and may well increase intestinal permeability. This means, it opens holes in the intestinal wall to make it easy for food particles to pass into the bloodstream. This may contribute to food allergies, autoimmune conditions, and systemic inflammation, such as “leaky gut,” which makes it difficult for the body to clear clogged pores before they develop into pimples, or full blown acne.

vine vera banner presents Quit Peanut Butter For Better Skin

Aflatoxin
Anything with the root word “toxin” could not possibly be good. Aflatoxin is a toxin created by molds which contributes to kidney and liver cancer, malnutrition, and virtue defects. Peanut butter is one of the most common dietary sources of aflatoxin. Although there is some evidence that the peanut butter making process may reduce aflatoxin by 89%, further studies need to be done to confirm whether or not the aflatoxin in peanut butter is a health concern. However, if aflatoxins are the problems, you’re probably better off with a processed peanut butter than a natural one, as the aflatoxin level tends to go down with increased processing.

Peanut Butter Is Addictive
“No kidding,” you say, as you scrape the last bit out of the jar. Peanut butter is what some might classify as a domino food, which means it may be a challenge to stop eating it. Remember,there are a lot of calories in just two tablespoons, and there’s a lot of tablespoons in a jar.

Sugar and Gluten
Most peanut butter on the market is made with sugar and hydrogenated oils, neither of which are very food for acne. Natural peanut butter may be a better choice, but you may want to put it on top of a banana rather than bread, and you may want to leave off the jelly, which will increase the sugar content.

Peanut Butter Alternatives
If you’re looking to cut down on the PB intake, cashew and almond butter are healthy alternatives, although they have yet to appear in Reeses products.

What do you think of these findings? Are you ready to cut down on the peanut butter? Let us know what you think.

Five Ways To Up the Resveratrol In your Diet

Woman reading a book and having red wine

You may have observed that wine is becoming a popular guest on morning celebrity talk shows. You may have seen Neil Patrick Harris chugging wine with Meredith Viera or Meredith Viera chugging wine with Ellen Degeneres or Hoda and Kathie Lee chugging wine with each other.

In the past decade or so, wine, especially red wine has received a lot of attention. It has been associated with heart health and health experts have even gone so far as to recommend moderate amounts of red wine as a part of a healthy diet. Because it straddles the border between edgy and safe, and because of its relatively low alcohol content, red wine seems to be the perfect drink of the morning talk show host. It says, “Look, we know how to have fun, but we do it responsibly.” I wonder if they know about resveratrol.

Red wine is perhaps the best-known source of resveratrol. Resveratrol is a member of a group of plant compounds called polyphenols. Polyphenols are known to have antioxidant properties which fight cancer and heart disease. But, perhaps resveratrol is most valued for its anti-aging properties and its potential to fight obesity. in a study on rodents, mice were split into two groups. One was fed a high-calorie diet and given resveratrol, the other was given a healthy diet, but no resveratrol. Not only did the resveratrol fed mice live longer, they were also protected from obesity-related health problem because, get this, Resveratrol mimics caloric restriction. (Give me some right now!!!)

Ok. Ok. Here are some ways you can up the resveratrol in your diet;

Blueberries on a wooden table

Blueberries
Although red grapes have significantly more, resveratrol is also present in blueberries along with antioxidants, dietary fiber, vitamins C and K and manganese.

Red Grapes
If alcohol isn’t your way to go, no problem. Red grapes don’t need to be fermented to have the antioxidant property. The skin of red grapes is loaded with resveratrol and also potassium, vitamin K, C, and B1. Remember, the Greek Gods ate these all the times, and they lived forever and looked pretty good doing it!

Peanut Butter
Who doesn’t love peanut butter? It goes with everything: apples, chocolate, celery, jelly, marshmallows, you name it! Peanut butter contains up to .13 mgs of resveratrol per cup and is also a great source of niacin and manganese.

Itadori Tea
You may have heard of this as a traditional herbal remedy used in Japan and China to combat strokes and heart disease. According to The Journal of Agricultural Food Chemistry, studies show that, “For people who do not consume alcohol, Itadori tea may be a suitable substitute for red wine.

Dark chocolate

Dark Chocolate
Oh, wow dark chocolate, peanut butter and red wine. Can this really all be good for you? In moderation. Dark chocolate contains antioxidants. iron, copper, manganese, and, you guessed it-resveratrol.

But, a word to the wise.

As tempting as it may be to raise a glass with your favorite tv personality, try to hold off drinking before noon.