Tag Archives: Moisturizer

Developing A Skin Care Routine Based On Your Skin’s Needs

Woman at mirror

When it comes to relationships, you know you need to consider the needs of your partners in order form a loving, solid, lasting relationship. But what about when it comes to your skin? Your skin has needs too. Are you listening to your skin? What is it trying to tell you? Are you giving it the attention it requires to perform at its peak and feel special and adored at all times? When it comes to developing a skin care routine, you need to take the needs of your skin into account in order to form a nurturing, healthy bond. Here are some tips for determining the right way to meet the needs of your skin for a more fulfilling relationship.

Simple Routine
An essential routine should be followed by everyone, regardless of skin type. A good general morning routine should consist of a cleanser, followed by and exfoliant, and topped off with a hydrating moisturizer with a built in SPF. An evening routine is basic repeat of the morning, only the SPF component of the moisturizer is not required. Daytime and nighttime moisturizers can be applied around the eyes as a substitute for eye cream, but if an additional eye cream is used, choose one with sunscreen for daytime application and one without sunscreen for the night, as with the moisturizer.

Woman using toner

Advanced Routine
If a specific skin issue needs to be addressed, such as signs of aging, uneven skin tones, large pores, and breakouts more advanced action may be called for. If this is the case, your routine may look something like this:

  • Cleanser
    A gentle cleanser should be applied first to remove debris and allow your skin to receive the maximum benefits from your other products.
  • Toner
    Toners contain replenishing ingredients to hydrate and refresh the surface of the skin after cleansing. They also smooth and calm skin, minimizing redness and the appearance of dry patches. Those will oily skin will notice tightening of the pores after repeated toner usage.
  • Exfoliant
    Exfoliants remove dead skin build up for noticeable skin renewal and elimination of dullness. Choose products with AHAs to exfoliate the skins surface, and BHAs which go deeper to penetrate oil that can clog pores and worsen the appearance of deep wrinkles and fine lines.
  • Acne Treatment (If Needed)
    If acne is an issue, a topical treatment with benzoyl peroxide is recommended to kill bacteria and prevent new blemishes from appearing. Use after exfoliation with AHAs and BHAs for maximum benefit.
  • Skin Lightening (If Needed)
    If dark spots and discoloration are a problem, skin lighteners with hydroquinone can fade spots within 8 to 12 weeks of use. Ongoing use will help to maintain results, as will the use of a broad spectrum sunscreen.
  • Serum
    Serums are packed with antioxidants and anti aging ingredients to help protect your skin from environmental damage. Apply twice daily to keep skin looking young and radiant.
  • Anti-aging Moisturizer (With Sunscreen For Daytime, Without For Night)
    Every skin type can benefit from a good moisturizer. When used daily, moisturizers, whether in cream, lotion, or gel form, work to hydrate skin keeping it plumped and noticeably younger.
  • Targeted Solutions
    Targeted solutions are optional products that can be used as an extra step to calm or hydrate skin, absorb an excess of oil, or address a certain issue, such as those related to aging. Examples of targeted solutions include facial masks, lip care, and mattifiers.

What do you do to make sure the needs of your skin are being met? Let us know! We love to hear from you!

A Moisturizer For Skin and Hair

Woman touching face

Today, many of us won’t touch a product unless it lists hyaluronic acid, retinol, or any of the other scientific-sounding ingredients that seem to be revolutionizing the face of skin care, and your own, these days. However, while much of this stuff has proven quite effective, there are still those of us who prefer natural ingredients, that have grown out of the same earth as we have. Shea butter is a natural ingredient used for centuries. In fact, Cleopatra was said to have used it in her beauty regimen, and they say Marc Anthony was not hard on the eyes. Here are some of the ways shea butter can be used as a moisturizer for skin and hair.

For Skin

  1. Healing
    Shea butter contains fatty acids and plant sterols which do not convert into soap as easily as other nut oils and fats, which makes it a great healer for skin. Raw shea butter has been known to help treat skin rashes, and peeling after tanning and is effective on everything from scars, frostbite, athlete’s foot, stretch marks, arthritis, to insect bites.
  2. Antioxidants
    Shea butter consists of plant antioxidants, like vitamin A and vitamin E and catechins, which protect cells from damage by the environment and free radicals, and cinnamic acid esters to prevent skin from sun damage.
  3. Anti-Aging
    In addition to preventing sun damage, shea butter can stimulate the production of collagen, the protein building block of skin. The vitamins E and A lend their moisturizing powers, keeping skin supple and preventing premature wrinkles.
  4. Skin Elasticity
    As mentioned earlier, shea butter is non-saponifiable, which means it does not convert easily into soap. This and its vitamin F content make it vital in the maintenance of skin elasticity and tone.

Woman combing hair

For Hair

    1. Dry Scalp
      Got flakes? Try shea butter. It’s an effective treatment for dandruff or a dry itchy scalp. Shea butter is easily absorbed into the skin, so you don’t have to worry about greasy residue or clogged pores. Once penetrated, its vitamins A and E work to repair breakage, soothe dryness, and mend split ends.
    2. Moisturizer
      Shea butter can be used as a natural substitute for your conditioner. Its presence of A and E vitamins make it effective in locking moisture in without added weight and greasiness. Shea butter is widely used in the treatments of curly hair because of its emollient properties, It can also restore moisture loss caused by chemical treatments, such as perms and straighteners.
    3. Hair Protection
      Not only can shea butter protect your skin against free radicals, it can protect your hair as well. The small amount of SPF contained in the cream provides sufficient protection from sun damage caused by UV rays, and can actually repair preexisting damage as well. This is because shea butter coats the shaft of the hair to protect it from heat tools and other damaging materials. This is especially beneficial to frequent swimmers looking to protect hair from chlorine and to those with colored or processed hair.
    4. Hair Softener
      Brittle, dry hair? Shea butter to the rescue. Because of its non-greasy texture, shea butter can help control the spread of excess oil in the scalp and make hair soft and silky. Shea butter should be applied generously twice a week for moisturizing and improving hair texture and growth.

Do you use shea butter? Let us know which one of its myriad of applications you find most beneficial and how it is working for you.

What Makes Argan Oil So Beneficial for Your Skin?

Argan oil is one of the most sought after culinary and cosmetic oils in the world. Here are some of the ingredients that make this oil so desirable and some of the ways you can take advantage of its benefits.

Argan Oil
Argan oil has been used as a healing oil throughout the centuries to treat skin conditions. The oil owes its healing properties to its high content of vitamin E and A and its wealth of antioxidants, such as omega -6 fatty acid and linoleic acid. Applied topically, the tocopherol from the vitamin E can boost cell production, promoting healthy skin and hair. Here are some of the top cosmetic uses for argan oil.

Argan oil

Night Time Moisturizer
After your nightly cleanser, pour a drop of argan oil in your palm to warm. Massage it into face and neck using a circular motion. Next, apply a drop to your face from the bridge of your nose to your temple using a tapping motion. Continue to use this gentle tapping to place a drop beneath your eyes. You will find the oil absorbs quickly without leaving a residue and that the A and E vitamins will help to reduce fine lines.

Skin Toner
To reap the benefits of argan oil in your toner, add two to four drops of the oil to eight ounces of toner or, follow this recipe to make your own chemical- free version:

Pour a cup of boiling water over a green tea bag and allow to steep for seven to ten minutes. Remove the bag and allow the tea to come to room temperature. Add a drop or two of an essential oil of your choice, add two to four drops of the argan oil and seal in a jar. Use twice daily after cleansing and before moisturizing.

face serum

Improving Acne-Prone Skin
Another benefit of argan oil is its ability to reduce sebum levels and fight acne. The high linoleic acid content can reduce inflammation due to acne while healing damaged skin cells. Simply apply a drop into problem areas, or fight whiteheads by making the skin toner (see above) using a few drops of tea tree oil. The tree tea oil will complement the argan oil with its supply of antioxidants, antiviral, antibacterial and anti-fungal properties.

Healing Stretch Marks
Argan oil helps restore elasticity to the skin lost to stretching. Warm two to three drops of the oil in your palms and rub on problem areas. The vitamin A and E will prevent stretch marks from forming. If you have already existing stretch marks, massage argan oil and brown sugar to the affected area before bathing. Rinse and reapply the oil to the area before dressing.

Caring for Your Nails
The non-greasy moisturizing agents in this oil make it ideal for treating nails and cuticles. Remove all traces of nail polish from hands and toes and dot a tiny drop into each nail, rubbing into cuticle and nail bed. Allow nails to absorb the oil, then rinse and apply polish as usual. Regular treatment should help your nails grow strong and beautiful, while preventing the formation of painful hangnails.

Have you used argan oil? Are the goats on to something? Their hair is fabulous and their hooves are really strong.

Five Steps To A Great Skincare Routine

There is nothing new about the “less is more” concept. Even before Susie Faux termed the phrase “capsule wardrobe” in the seventies, people have realized the wisdom of quality over quantity and the freedom derived from having less. So why is it that so many people are obsessed with multi-step beauty routines?

Of course, if you have the time and patience, you’re welcome to spend as much of it on skin care as you like, but, if you don’t, there is nothing wrong with keeping it scaled down. Remember, you own your beauty routine, it doesn’t own you. So, if you believe in keeping it short and sweet, here’s are five steps that will help you maximize while you minimize.

Woman cleansing skin

Cleanse
Cleansing skin is the most basic step in a skin routine. It should be done twice daily, once in the morning and once at night, to give skin time to heal and breath without being clogged by makeup and debris.

Cleansing should be done with clean hands. Begin by wetting skin with warm water to open the pores. Apply a cleanser appropriate to your skin type using upward circular motions. Some products will be more effective if you leave them on for a minute or two to allow penetration. Remove with damp cotton pads or by splashing your face with cold water. (Cold water will close up pores.) Pat dry gently with a clean towel.

Tone
Toning restores your skin’s pH balance, which is usually altered during the cleansing process. This step can also make your skin more resistant to bacteria. Some toners will only restore your skin’s pH, others will kill bacteria, still others may contain an extra ingredient to prevent acne. Choose the one that suits your skin, and, if you have sensitive skin, be sure to use a specially formulated toner.

Apply toner to entire face with a cotton pad, taking care to avoid your eyes. Do not rinse off.

Woman moisturizing

Moisturize
Moisturizing is the most important step in the beauty routine, and should not be omitted, even if your skin is oily. There is quite a variety of moisturizing products, such as gels (oily skin), creams (dry/sensitive skin), and serums (normal/oily skin). Some may contain anti wrinkle, and anti acne agents, others may tint, or tan, skin.

Apply moisturizer to the face and neck, after toner has dried, using a circular motion. You may want to follow up with a separate moisturizer targeted toward preventing swelling and aging in the eye area.

Exfoliate
Once or twice weekly, use an exfoliator to remove dead skin cells. Make sure not to use anything too harsh, which can irritate skin and tear skin cells.

Remove makeup and massage the exfoliator gently into your face using an outward circular motion for about thirty seconds. Remember, gently is the key word here! If you’re using an exfoliating wash cloth, soak it in warm water and rub it in small circles on your face. Be sure to target creases by your nose and other areas on which blackheads tend to develop.

Face mask

Face Mask
Peel off masks are the best option for unclogging pores, and are the best for oily or acne prone skin. Those with dry skin will benefit most from moisturizing masks.

Choose a natural, mild mask. Keep applications down to once a week or less; frequent applications will result in over cleansing your face. You can make your own, in the interest of keeping it natural, or use a store bought one, following directions on the package.

What do you think of the five-step skin routine? Is less more, or is more more? Let us know what you think?

The Correct Amount of Product

Friends applying skin care products

If a little of something is good, then more must be better, right? Not so when it comes to beauty products. Use too little and you won’t get the full benefit of the products you’ve invested your hard-earned money in. Use too much and you can waste product, along with causing buildup and breakouts. Below is a cheat sheet for you to find out just how much of your most-used products to use.

Makeup Remover
If you’re looking for convenience, look no further than pre-soaked makeup remover wipes. Some wipes need to be dampened with water before use, others you take straight to your face. For those of you who prefer your makeup remover in a bottle, simply moisten a cotton pad with just enough product to saturate it, then gently remove your makeup.

Facial Cleanser
For regular liquid cleansers, a nickel-sized amount of product is enough to properly wash your face and neck. If you’re using a foam cleanser, one pump is all you need. Massaging the product into your skin first, before using a washcloth or other scrubbing device will ensure your skin is getting the benefit of the product!

Exfoliator
When using a physical exfoliator, like a facial scrub, a dime-sized amount is all you need. Chemical exfoliators (such as glycolic acid or lactic acid) can typically be used in smaller amounts; a pea-sized amount will do.

Mask
Depending on the face mask, a nickel-sized amount will be enough to cover your face and neck. Typically, masks call for a thin layer of product and using more doesn’t make the product work any better. Some masks, on the other hand, you won’t need to apply to your entire face, so start with a pea-sized amount and add more if needed.

Toner
For toners that come in a spray bottle, 2-3 spritzes across the face and neck are all you need. Regular liquid toners can be applied to a cotton pad and then wiped across the face and neck.

Serum
A serum is a concentrate of skin-loving ingredients, so a little goes a long way. Start with a pea-sized amount to apply to your face and neck and only use more if you need it.

Moisturizer
Whether you are using daytime or nighttime facial moisturizer, a dime-sized amount will suffice when applying it to your face and neck. Your skin should never feel greasy or dry after applying moisturizer, so if you find that your skin cannot absorb that much product, you may need a lighter formula, and if your skin is still dry— a richer formula.

Eye Cream
Apply your eye cream by gently dabbing a pea-sized amount of product around the corners and underneath of each eye with a pinky or forefinger to prevent tugging.

Sunscreen
This is one product most people don’t use enough of! For your face alone, use a nickel-sized amount for adequate protection. For covering the rest of your body, use the equivalent amount of a full shot glass.

Are You Forgetting Something?

Your summer checklist probably includes a few barbecues, maybe a pool party, and a juicy beach read. It’s easy for us to remember all the fun parts of summer but below are a few things to remember when heading out for your summer fun.

Woman applying hair conditioner

Hair
We don’t often think of our hair when thinking about sun care, but prolonged exposure to the sun can lead to dry, brittle strands. Plus, color-treated hair will fade much more quickly when not properly protected. There are several products on the market these days just for hair. Look for the words “UV protection” on the bottle and shop online or check out a beauty supply store for a wider selection.

Scalp Protection
You’ve likely had a sunburn on your scalp before, so you already know how painful it can be, but it’s also important to remember that skin cancer can form anywhere on our bodies, including the scalp. Sunscreens in a spray application are ideal for reaching the scalp since they aren’t greasy like lotion formulas; however, there are also powder sunscreens you can try if your hair already tends to be oily. You can also top off your look with a hat; just make sure to keep it on while you’re in the sun!

Woman wearing sunglasses

Eyes
Some of us never leave the house without sunglasses, but for those of you who are forgetting your sunnies at home, take note! The sun is bad news for eyes. Squinting, dryness, and age spots all contribute to premature aging around the eyes and repeated exposure to the sun raises your risk of eye diseases, including cancer, cataracts, and macular degeneration. Look for sunglasses that cover as much of the eye area as possible and block 99 percent or more of both UVA and UVB rays.

Ears
Did you know that your ears are the third most likely place for skin cancer to appear? When you’re applying sunscreen to your face and body, make sure to get your ears covered. Most sunscreens need to be reapplied every two hours, and you’ll want to make sure you cover your ears again at that time.

Woman applying lip balm

Lips
Parched, sunburned lips can be a thing of the past if you keep your lips protected from the sun. Keep a lip balm with you at all times that has an SPF of at least 15 and reapply often. Make sure you avoid sparkly or shiny glosses since the reflective nature of those formulas only attracts more sun to your lips.

After-Sun Care
What you do after you’re out in the sun can be just as important as what you do before. Soothing aloe vera gel or after-sun lotions can help your skin stay hydrated and promote quicker healing of burns. You can easily grow your own aloe vera plant indoors and use the gel directly from the plant!
Woman drinking water

Hydrate
You’re already drinking your eight glasses a day, and that’s great, but in warmer weather, we lose more water through perspiration and sheer exertion. Make sure you’re sipping water throughout the day and keep plenty of water-rich foods, such as watermelon, grapes, and berries around to snack on.

The summer months don’t have to leave us dried out and burnt. Keep your skin glowing and your health intact by making sure you remember these tips!

Boosting Your Skin’s Hydration

Woman applying a moisturizer

One of the golden rules of skincare is to make sure you keep your skin hydrated. Nobody wants dry and flaky, irritated, reddened, or itchy skin, right? One of the key components to avoiding this and achieving healthy, glowing, youthful skin is hydration. That said, achieving and maintaining a healthy level of skin hydration can be harder than one might think. Let’s take a look at some ideas on how to keep your skin hydrated.

Does Drinking Water Help?
It is often said that if you drink enough water, it’ll show in your skin. Sadly, the truth isn’t that simple. There are a lot of reasons to drink a lot of water: it’s necessary for life and it’s healthy to drink a lot of it, it offers a nice refreshed feeling, helps in digestion, helps you regulate your temperature and energy levels, and more. That said, having hydrated skin is unfortunately not on the list of reasons to drink water. When you ingest water, it first goes through the intestines, and is then added to your bloodstream, filtered by the kidneys, and finally hydrating the cells. It can help a little bit with skin cell hydration, but it will make a marginal difference at best. That said, do be sure you’re drinking lots of water for all the other health benefits.

What Does Work Then?
The most surefire way to hydrate your skin is a solid moisturizer. You should hunt for one that matches your skin type; lighter creams for naturally oily faces, and heavier ones for dry faces. If you have sensitive skin, look for hypoallergenic moisturizers. Bonus points if they also have soothing ingredients like aloe or chamomile in them to help treat, prevent, and control any irritation that does come up for sensitive skin types.

You should also minimize your exposure to sunlight, wind, arid environments, alcohol, and long baths. Further, always use an SPF 30 or higher sunscreen when you are going to be exposed to the sun, and if you live in a windy or arid environment, try reapplying a bit of moisturizer after every time you spend any substantial amount of time outdoors.

Your Diet Does Matter, However
Drinking water alone may not be linked to as great an increase in skin hydration as some people like to think, but that said, what you put into your mouth does have an effect on your skin’s moisture levels. Try eating foods rich in omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids like walnuts, flaxseed, olive oil, and salmon, to name just a few. You can also find fish oil, borage oil, and flaxseed oil supplements you can take as softgels.

Additionally, and more broadly, you want to be eating a lot of dark leafy greens, colorful, dark fruits, and lean protein in your diet. This tip is less related to skin hydration specifically and more overall health, but staying in good general health is a great way to get that “healthy glow” on your face, and is just a good idea regardless.

Boost Your AHA

Woman getting a cleansing treatment

Alpha hydroxy acids are a group of several types of acids which naturally occur in foods, including but not limited to citric acid from citrus fruits, glycolic acid from sugar cane, lactic acid from milk, malic acid from apples, and tartaric acid from grapes. But why should you care? Well, interestingly enough, there’s a fair bit of evidence indicating that alpha-hydroxy acids could help even out and firm up your skin when applied topically. While more study is necessary to say for certain, alpha-hydroxy acids seem to be able to remove the top layers of dead skin cells, making them a powerful exfoliant, and cause deeper, living layers of skin to thicken, which may promote firmness, acting as a potential anti-aging ingredient.

So let’s go over a few of the ways you can use alpha-hydroxy acids to better your skin.

Commercial Creams
You can get commercially available creams that contain various alpha-hydroxy acids in moisturizers, peels, etc. For something you’re going to leave on long-term, you don’t want anything stronger than a 8% concentration for most alpha-hydroxys, and 14% for products using the alpha-hydroxy acid acid gluconalactone. Leave-on creams with this concentration are effective for treating sun-damaged and aging skin to help firm it up.

For exfoliation to get softer, smoother skin and/or help reduce the appearance of acne scars, glycolic acid is a good bet. You should use glycolic acid peels once every two weeks, starting with a 20% concentration and then building to 35%, 50%, and finally 70%, leaving the peel on for 2 minutes the first time, and adding a minute every time until you hit 4-5 minutes.

Homemade Treatments
Remember how we said that alhpa-hydroxy acids are found in foods? You can take advantage of this fact by using fresh fruits right at home. You can apply lemon juice to your face (though you might want to water it down slightly, try one part lemon juice to one part water) and rinse after leaving it there for a few minutes. You can also used crushed papaya, tomato seed pulp (the juicy, seedy center of the tomato), plain yogurt (which contains lactic acid), or blended pineapple meat as an anti-aging mask. It might be a little messy and sticky, but the leftovers from your project mean you get an anti-aging treatment and a snack at the same time!

Talk to Your Dermatologist and Listen to Your Body
With all alpha-hydroxy acids (and, for that matter, beauty products in general) listen to your body, and immediately stop and rinse off the product or homemade treatment if it starts to cause uncomfortable pain, tingling, or burning (low-levels of tingling that do not cause discomfort are okay).

Finally, make sure you discuss your skincare with a dermatologist, and don’t forget to detail all aspects of your home care! And with potentially harmful acids (alpha-hydroxy acids are considered generally safe in the right concentrations and when used correctly, but they are still acid, and can quite literally burn you if misused), you should check with your dermatologist before beginning any homemade treatments. Tell them exactly what you intend to try and get the all clear first. It may sound like a pain, but “better safe than sorry” definitely applies here!

Using Natural Moisturizers

Moisturizers are necessary in every beauty routine. However, not every moisturizer is for every skin type and sensitive skin can become irritated by some chemicals that are present in moisturizers. That’s why it’s a good idea to look in to natural alternatives for moisturizers including shea butter, olive oil and castor oil and more.

shea nuts

Shea Butter
Shea butter is an all-natural vitamin A cream that serves as a superb moisturizer with healing properties for the skin. The vitamin A can improve skin conditions such as skin allergies, insect bites, sunburns and frostbite while offering unparalleled moisturizing properties. This is due to the fact that the moisturizers in shea butter contains the same moisturizers produced by the sebaceous glands in the skin. It is inexpensive yet effective at reducing flaking, redness and peeling.

olive oil

Olive Oil
Extra virgin olive oil helps hold in your skin’s natural moisture and prevents it from drying out. It is recommended to apply it to your skin before going to bed at night. Because its chemical composition is similar to that of human skin, your skin will absorb it easily. It contains vitamins A and E which help repair sun and environmental damage and it is good for almost any skin type. Its polyphonic compounds reverse free radicals which can cause premature aging.

castor oil

Castor Oil
The fatty oils in castor oil can penetrate through skin layers to stimulate the production of collagen and elastin. This will soften and repair skin while diminishing the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles. It works especially well on crow’s feet and dark circles around the eyes. It is recommended that you put it on your face after washing it before going to bed. It will soak into skin as you sleep.

aloe vera

Aloe Vera
Aloe vera is another great natural moisturizer. Effective for men of women, when used topically, aloe vera can slow the signs of aging. This is due to the fact that it increases collagen, therefore increasing the skin’s elasticity. Nutrients like beta-carotene and vitamins E and C will keep skin plump. It cleanses and softens skin without leaving it greasy or clogging pores.

avocados

Avocado Oil
Avocado oil has some amazing benefits for your skin when used as a natural moisturizer. It is one of the most penetrative of all natural plant oils, so it is believed to penetrate through the epidermis into the dermis layer of the skin. Once there, it helps increase collagen production in the layers of the dermis. A good extra virgin olive oil is especially useful for flaking, dehydrated, sun damaged faces.

coconut

Coconut Oil
Coconut oil is full of saturated fats that help the skin stay moisturized. The fats also aid in preventing moisture loss through the skin’s pores. It increases hydration and reduces water loss in seriously dry skin and leaves skin feeling nourished and smooth. It can also be used to moisturize hair and scalp or will leave your skin looking hydrated after shaving your legs.

So, have you used any of these natural moisturizers for you skin, and, if so, how have they worked for you? What natural moisturizers do you use that don’t appear on this list? We’d love to hear from in the comments section.

The Science Behind Moisturizers – Vine Vera Reviews

Woman applying moisturizer on her face.

Moisturizers come in various types, shapes, sizes and compounds. There are millions of women who wake up across the globe every morning, wash their face, and put moisturizer on to hydrate, protect, and infuse their skin with botanicals and ingredients that will allow their faces to look youthful, beautiful, and fresh. There’s more behind these products than meets the eye, and of course Vine Vera wanted to be the ones to uncover the science behind moisturizers and what makes them work, and bring that information to you today in this article.

What is Transepidermal Water Loss?
Transepidermal water loss, otherwise known as TEWL, is the process of moisture being lost from the skin due to dry climates, artificial heaters in the home or office, or the use of products which can often times dry out the skin. This process happens when water moves from the dermis, or middle layer of skin, to the skin’s surface, the epidermis, and then evaporates, leaving behind dry, dull skin that is begging for attention through means of lotions, creams and of course, moisturizers.

The Three Types of Moisturizers
There are three types of moisturizer products in which you will typically buy in a store, catalog, or online. They are:

  1. Humectants
  2. Occlusives
  3. Emollients

You’re probably sitting there thinking, “Whoa. That sounds scientific.” And in fact, it is. To give you a breakdown of the three and explain in terms you can understand, lets take a look at each individual moisturizer type, and what they do.

Humectants
Humectants work exceptionally well for dry skin, because they retain moisture within the epidermis and alleviate the flakiness of dry, itchy skin. They have also been known to help stimulate ceramide production within the body, which in turn give a waxy, protective coating to the skin, giving the skin a more youthful, moist appearance. These products are not usually recommended for those with oily skin.

Occlusives
This is known as the ‘Old School’ moisturizer. They work by forming a protective barrier over the epidermis, or outer layer of skin, that water is not able to get through. Water on the skin can actually dry the skin out, and these types of moisturizers also prevent water from escaping the skin as well. You might know an occlusive in the form of petroleum jelly, more commonly known by the brand name, Vaseline. These types of occlusives can cut TEWL by up to 98% and therefore, are very effective. They can tend to have a thick, greasy feel, however; and therefore, aren’t practical to cover yourself in – which is why they are generally used for target specific areas, and mainly used at night time nowadays. These products are generally geared towards those with severe dry skin, or to those with aging skin.

Emollients
Emollients are meant to penetrate the skins layers, creating softer, smoother skin which feels better hydrated and more supple. They are able to be absorbed by the skin, filling in the gaps and areas where proteins have broken down within the skin’s cells, providing long lasting moisture and a more flexible feel. Emollients work well for most skin types – even oily and greasy skin. You can find many different types and lotions labeled under the emollient category on your favorite drug store’s shelves for purchase. Most body lotions contain emollients.

Choose Your Moisturizer Wisely
Vine Vera hopes this scientific breakdown has helped to give you a better understanding of what each of these types of moisturizers can do for you, and what skin types should use them. Who knew moisturizers could be so scientific? Make sure you choose the appropriate lotion or moisturizer for your particular skin care needs to obtain maximum benefits from the product.