Tag Archives: hygiene

Dermatologist Recommendations For Storing Beauty Products

Woman with cosmetics storage

Are you a makeup hoarder? If you have eye shadows colors that only a teenager can get away with and you’re over the age of 30, the answer is probably “yes.” Whether it’s an attachment issue, or if you’re just sort of lazy, expert advice says, “Out with the old,” and it’s not just a backlash against hoarding. Apparently, there are certain guidelines when it comes to storing your cosmetics and, if your safety is a concern, you may want to know them.

Storing Cosmetics
Cosmetic products should remain safe for a reasonable amount go time, provided they are properly stored. That means makeup should be kept in a dry, cool place, without exposure to direct sunlight and the lids securely closed. Hands should be clean before putting fingers into products for application and sharing makeup is not advisable.

Product Deterioration
Once you open your makeup, it becomes exposed to dirt and microorganisms, such as yeasts, mold and bacteria found on applicators, brushes, and in the air. Although most cosmetics contain preservatives to kill the microorganisms, the efficacy of these additives can decrease with time and increased exposure to air. If contaminated, use of these products can cause irritation or infection of the skin. Products must be checked regularly to prevent this from occurring.

FDA Rules
There are no US laws requiring cosmetics to have expiration dates. The FDA considers the shelf life of cosmetics to be part of the responsibility of the manufacturer. Sunscreen and acne products, which are considered to be drugs under law, are subject to regulation and are required to have expiration dates on the label.

Cosmetics on dressing table

Shelf Life
So how long should you hold on to your product? In the UK, products with a shelf life of less than two and a half years a required to be labelled with a best before date, however dating is not common, due to the fact that most cosmetics have a shelf life exceeding two and a half years. However, eye area cosmetics usually have the shortest shelf lives in the cosmetic family and manufacturers tend to recommend discarding mascara two to four months after it is purchased because mascara is exposed to fungi and bacteria with ever usage, and becomes unsafe quickly.

How Do I Know If A Product Is No Longer Safe?
If you come across makeup that has not had a lid on it for a long period of time, you should probably toss it, regardless of the expiration date. Check products for suspicious smell, color, or texture. Lumpy discolored makeup may not do its job properly and could be risky to someone with preexisting skin conditions.

Useful Tips

  • Read instruction and warnings carefully.
  • Keep lids on products and use products within recommended time period.
  • Avoid storing cosmetics in direct sunlight or near heat sources. Choose cool, dry areas when possible.
  • Do not mix or dilute products with other products unless instructed.
  • Make sure all applicators or hands are clean before applying cosmetics. Wash applicators regularly with detergent, soap, or mild shampoo.
  • Make sure applicators dry completely before use.
  • Avoid sharing cosmetics.

How do you store your cosmetics? Do you still have your punk rock purple lipstick from the eighties? Let us know what shocking things you discovered weeding through your old makeup! We love to hear from you!

What’s Best: Manual Or Electric?

When it comes to choosing between manual and electric products, electric wins hands down, right? Why use your own energy when you can get it from somewhere else? Seldom do we hear of someone rejecting the use of a sewing machine in favor of a good old needle and thread, and does anyone even remember manual typewriters? Likewise, it seems beyond consideration that anyone in their right mind would fan themselves with a piece of paper if a table fan was an option.

Yes, when you consider the choices, it seems electricity is the clear winner, but are there ever times when you’re better off doing it the old fashioned way? After all, we have all heard the saying, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” Let’s take a look at some common hygienic devices: the toothpaste and the razor to determine if we are ever better off doing it ourselves.

Woman brushing teeth

Toothbrushes
If you ask a child, they’ll go for the electric every time; after all you can’t beat the allure of the Spongebob handle, but, according to the ADA, manual toothbrushes can be just as effective. The key, say experts, is not in what you use, but how you use it. Kimberly Harms, DDS, says, “If you are a wonderful brusher and flosser than manual toothbrushes are just great.” However, she does allow that power devices can be better for those who have trouble physically maneuvering a toothbrush.

Cost
The cost of an electrically powered toothbrush can be triple the cost of its manual counterpart. Is it worth it? At 6,000 to 30,000 stroked per minute, it takes less time to do a thorough job with the electric version. However, the action may be a little intense for those with sensitive teeth and users also find the electric version difficult to store.

The Final Word
Braun Oral -B studied more than 16,000 patients after being asked to use a Braun Oral-B powered tooth brush. When asked, dental professionals said that the powered bush had a positive effect on the oral health of over 80% of the patients, with most participants claiming an improvement in the health of their mouths after using the device.

Electric Razors

The Pros
Electric razors are more time efficient; because electric razors force hairs up before cutting them, men don’t have to keep going over the same areas. They are also more portable than their manual counterparts and do not require items such as gels, soaps, shaving cream or even water for use, Electric razors also can be used to shape facial hair more accurately and reduce the probability of cuts, nicks, and ingrown hairs.

The Cons
Electric razors do not shave as closely as manual ones, and those with normal to heavy facial hair may find themselves having to shave more frequently with the electric versions. Electrics take time to get used to, and can lead to painful irritation in the process. The majority of powered razors cannot be used in the shower and are rather noisy.
Electric razors also need more attention when it comes to maintenance. They need to be cleaned ofter and require rechargeable batteries or an electrical outlet. Although the initial cost may be high, electric razors may actually be more cost effective than manual ones in the long run.

Manual Razors

manual razor

The Pros
Manual razors will provide the closest shave, keeping the need for touchups to a minimum. They are extremely easy to use and blades are easily replaced. Manual razors are easy to travel with and easy to keep clean. They are also usually the cheapest shaving option available, although their cost can add up over time.

The Cons
Shaving with a manual razor requires the use of grooming products, like shaving cream and aftershave. This not only necessitates the purchase of additional products, it also makes the shaving process take longer. Another negative aspect to the manual razor is the tendency of the blades to become dull. On the average, the blades of a manual razor need to be replaced every four to five shaves. Using a manual razor often requires join over the same area several times, which can increase the chance of getting nicked or cut, and a painless shave calls for water, making the manual razors the less versatile option.

So what do you think? Man power or electric? Let us know how you weigh in.

Truth and Lies About Your Pores

Portrait of woman

Do you practice pore hygiene? Chances are that if you are concerned about your skin, you probably do. But how do you really know about these little holes on your face? While many truths about pores are known, there is still so much that remains so “porely” misunderstood. But now, it’s time to get down to the truth about what’s behind your pore health. Here are some truths and myths about your pores.

What Is A Pore?
Basically, pores are small opening in the surface of the skin that secrete liquid. Our bodies hold millions of them.

Two Kinds of Pores
The term pore can be confusing, because there are actually two kinds of pores that serve different functions:

Pilosebaceous Unit (Hair Follicles That Hold Oil Glands)
These are the pores most often associated with clear, or unclear, skin. The purpose of these pores are to lubricate the skin. They are located all over the body, except for on the palm and soles of the feet. When they get blocked, which happens often , skin conditions like acne can, and often do, occur

Sweat Pores
These are the ducts for our sweat glands which serve to cool our body. They are located all over, but are more highly concentrated on the groin, under the arms, and on the hands and feet. They do not normally become blocked.

Although we often associate oily skin with sweaty skin, they are not the same thing. This means a sweaty workout should not cause acne. This also means that it is impossible to “sweat out toxins” because toxins are not found in the sweat glands.

Woman in mirror

Myth 1: Pores Can Change Sizes
Pore size is determined genetically. However, sometimes stubborn blackheads can resemble large pores. When enough material accumulates, as is the case with blackheads, an invisible pore can expand to many time its size until it looks like a blemish.

Myth 2: Heat Opens Pores, Cold Closes Them
This is not only untrue because temperature does not cause pores to open and close, but also because pores do not open or close at all. This is what’s really going on.

Firstly, heat from a shower or sauna may soften debris that causes clogging of pores, making it easier to remove with extraction or exfoliation. Secondly, moisture and heat soften the skin’s connective tissue fibers, stretching the pores, and making debris easier to extract and exfoliate.

A word to the wise: While warm, moist skin is more conducive to extracting debris, it is also more prone to tearing. At home exfoliation is fine, but leave extractions to the professional. Also, avoid touching your face after exfoliation until after you wash your hands.

Porely Enough
The sad news is that pores can become more visible and larger over time because the skin stretches and slackens as collagen and elastin break down.

Surely Enough
There are a lot of things you can do to reduce pore visibility. Deep cleaning and exfoliating will decrease the look of pores and a deep cleansing facial or light peel done by a professional can remove debris without skin damage. There are also dermatology laser and light devices available to restore elasticity to skin and minimize the appearance of pores.

How do you explain your pore health? Let us know!