Tag Archives: Healthy Skin

Natural Ingredients To Add To Your Daily Routine

If you subscribe to the long-held belief that ignorance is bliss, it will logically follow that the less ignorant we, as a society become, the less blissful we will be. Case in point: Until not long ago, we were carelessly lying in the sun, eating our McDonald’s, and using doorknobs in doctors’ offices. We now know UV light produces free radicals, our foods are packed with preservatives and artificial ingredients, and just about every surface we touch is swarming with bacteria. What’s next? Our beauty products? According to Dr. Axe, the majority of commercially available beauty products are packed with fragrances, artificial colors, stabilizers and preservatives that can be absorbed through the pores of the skin, leading to a range of potential negative long-term effects on our health, specifically hormone imbalance, and irregular periods. Luckily, there are natural alternatives to ensure your skin remains radiant while your body remains healthy.

Apple cider vinegar

Apple Cider Vinegar
This inexpensive natural skin care product can help to kill pathogens, such as bacteria, and clear skin problems arising from gut issues. Apple cider vinegar was first used by Hippocrates who believed in its anti-fungal properties as a useful treatment for skin sores and ulcerations. Additionally, ACV contains beneficial vitamins, such as potassium and magnesium, which make it an excellent detoxifier when taken internally.

Raw honey

Raw Honey
Raw honey is known to reduce breakouts and scars, boost hydration, help to heal wounds, and fight allergies. Because raw honey is unprocessed, it is able to keep its nutrients intact, unlike most store bought honey. It has been used to heal everything from dandruff to diaper rash to psoriasis and can be used to treat acne when applied to the skin for ten minutes.

Sea salt

Sea Salt
You may have seen this ingredient popping up on food labels lately as a replacement for regular table salt. Sea salt is packed with nutrients like calcium, potassium, sodium, and magnesium which it absorbs from salt water. Luckily, these are the same types of mineral found in our skin, which is why sea salt is so effective in balancing, restoring and protecting our skin. It also contains anti-inflammatory properties for removal of dead skin cells, the balance of oil production, maintenance of skin moisture levels and calming of breakouts.

Avocado

Avocado
A much loved fatty fruit, the avocado contains vitamin A, D, and E, all able to penetrate the skin to soothe sunburn, increase production of collagen and treat age spots. It can be applied externally or eaten to reduce skin inflammation and combined with essential oils or honey directly to skin.

Coconut oil

Coconut Oil
Coconut oil has a plethora of benefits, including the ability to strengthen skin tissue, remove dead skin cells, and protect against sunburn. Research shows that the antibacterial and antioxidant properties of the oil can even fight skin disease and defects in the epidermal barrier. Coconut oil can be used on both skin and hair, to cleanse, moisturize, and heal wounds, and because what we put inside us can effect how we look on the outside, the oil can help keep skin radiant when taken internally to wash away toxins and help with digestive function.

Tea tree oil

Tea Tree Oil
Tea tree oil has been used to combat redness, inflammation, and breakouts on skin for centuries. It provides a mild alternative to harsh acne treatments which can cause side effects and dry skin. Tea tree oil contains anti-fungal, antimicrobial and antibacterial properties and its phytochemicals make it one of the most effective of the skin care essential oils.

What do you think? Are you ready to scrap your serums and creams for avocados and coconuts? Let us know how you weigh in!

Foods That Are Killing your Complexion

Woman drinking juice

You look in the mirror, and there it is: a new zit. You do a quick mental inventory of the foods you’ve eaten in the last few days to determine the culprit, but it doesn’t take you long to determine; it’s that candy bar you ate the other day. How you tried to forget about that dietary blunder. You didn’t even list it in your food journal. But now, here it is, getting its revenge in the form of a large pimple that will probably taunt you for the next two weeks.

You know that you are what you eat and your skin is one of the biggest reminders. Although some foods are hard to resist, pimples are a high price to pay. But, forewarned is forearmed. So, in the spirit of forewarning, here are some foods that may be causing those complexion killers.

Canned Soup
Although it may make a cheap, quick lunch, canned soup contains bisphenol and sodium which can make skin retain water, causing it to become dry, swollen, and inflamed. Bone broth is a gut soothing option which can help to heal the stomach lining without making your skin break out in the process.

donuts

Processed Carbohydrates
Processed carbohydrates include all those foods we love like white bread, cereals, and baked goods. Unfortunately, these dietary staples break down and transform into sugar, which is bad news for your health and your skin. Seed and almond flour crackers are low in sugar and high in fiber and may save you from acne woes.

Juice
Another high-sugar bandit, juice is no friend to the acne-prone. Try a high protein smoothie with healthy fats instead.

Canned Tuna
While it may be accessible and cost effective, canned tuna may not be your healthiest seafood option. Dr. Lipman says, “It lacks the nutrients found in wild fish and is often farmed, causing mercury toxicity. ” Canned wild salmon is a safer source of omega-3s and has anti-inflammatory properties.

Woman eating pizza

Cheese made from Cow’s Milk
Pizza eaters be warned. According to Dr. Frank Lipman, MD, “Dairy is a brilliant trigger for skin issues like acne, as all dairy products come from lactating organic cows. Organic cows are filled with cow’s hormones, which can trigger hormonal acne in humans.” If you can, try replacing the dreaded zit inducer with lactose free cashew cheese or nutritional yeast, although they may not work as well as mozzarella on pizza.

Soda
Soda is a veritable cocktail of skin no no’s, from its high sugar level to its chemical content. Soda increases insulin levels and can interfere with the production of healthy bacteria. The result? A plethora of skin issuers ranging from eczema and rosacea to acne. Kombucha is a probiotic rich alternative, which would be a less “inflammatory” option.

Coffee
Caffeine in coffee can dehydrate skin. If you can sacrifice the jolt, consuming hot water with a hint of lemon can hydrate skin and reduce inflammation.

Are there any foods worth suffering zits for? Let us know what you think! And good luck keeping your complexion clear and lovely!

Battling Adult Acne

  Women examining acne on her face.

Most of us talk about how we would like to turn back the clock.  Sure, we would all like to look a bit  younger, but there are definitely some things about youth that we are happy to see the back of that denim jacket with the heavy metal patches on it that you wore until it rotted, the self-administered buzz cut, the experiments with green hair dye, and acne.  Yes, if there is anything to be glad about when it comes to aging, it would have to be the end of acne.  But, what if you find yourself having graduated to  adulthood when……THEY’RE BACK! Just when you thought you zapped, squeezed and hid your last pimple, white or black head, they’re back and badder than ever.

Why?

Hormones
Teens are not the only ones whose hormones are aflutter.  According to dermatologist Julia Tzu, MD of Wall Street Dermatology says,”Fluctuation in hormones, such as before one’s menstrual cycle, is the main cause.” Hormonal acne is identifiable by a painful outbreak around the chin neck and back and may occur before your menstrual cycle. High-stress levels can also contribute to hormonal imbalance.  When the stress hormone, cortisol, is released by the body, it is often accompanied by testosterone, a male hormone which leads to the production of more oil, ultimately resulting in more outbreaks.

Using the Wrong Products
If you are prone to breakouts, you should be using products that will not clog your pores. DR. Neal Schultz, of Beauty RX Skincare, suggest looking  for  the words “oil-free”, “non-comedogenic” or “water -based” on the label.

Overcleansing
 Dr.  Rebecca Kazin, MD of the John Hopkins Department of Dermatology says cleansing more than twice a day is too much and can just dry out skin “which can cause it to produce more oil to overcompensate.  Grainy and gritty cleansers  that rub your skin can similarly promote acne.    Try switching to a gentle detoxifying gel cleanser and two is the magic number.

Food
Many of us have heard that there is a direct relationship between chocolate, greasy food and acne, but. before you put down that Hershey’s bar, there is no statistic proof of any of this.  However, you would be well advised to avoid iodine, found in shellfish and greens like kelp and spinach.  Sugary food can also be a culprit.  By raising your insulin level, sugary foods can boost oil- triggering hormones, like testosterone.

Treatment Ingredients

Salicylic Acid
Also known as beta hydroxy acid, salicylic acid exfoliates gently to unclog pores.  It is go-to in anti-acne products and can be found in most OTC cleansers and spot treatments and is mild enough to use on your whole face.

Benzoyl Peroxide
This stuff kills acne bacteria whole exfoliating the pores but stick to spot treatment for this one.  It has been known to make skin irritated and should not be used all over the face.

Glycolic Acid
If you are facing the acne meets wrinkles stages, this may be just the thing. It removes dead skin cells on the surface and stimulates the collagen and  hyaluronic acid, improving skin’s texture on the whole.

Retinol
Another godsend for the acne meets wrinkles crowd.  It is one of the most effective treatments for acne and also has collagen building properties, but , be aware, can be too harsh for those with sensitive skin so try testing it on  a small spot on your skin before you commit to it.

Exfoliate
Probably the best thing you can do to fight acne is exfoliated and the best way to so it is with glycol acid.  A glycol cleanser is helpful, but exfoliating pads and serums that really soak your skin are more effective.

Keep Spot Treatment on Hand
As soon as you feel that zit waiting to burst our, zap it with some benzoyl peroxide to start killing bacteria immediately.  Try to look for a gentle formula with soothing ingredients  for adult skin.

In closing, while these treatments are all effective, keep in mind that hormones are some pretty powerful players.  If topical treatment isn’t enough, talk to your doctor.  He may have the best advice on the best course of action.

Dietary Supplements for Healthy Skin

Fish oil supplements

Many of us strive to have healthy skin but it’s a continuous process, one that requires eating foods that can have a positive effect on our skin, using creams and lotions, and trying to figure out new techniques to have the skin looking its best. Dietary supplements can help, especially if you’re not eating as well as you could be. If you’re interested in giving them a shot in an effort to get healthier skin, the following supplements could be worth looking into.

Fish Oil
Fish oil is wonderful for helping skin look healthy. For example, it’s said to have anti-inflammatory properties. It may even help protect the skin from sun damage and skin cancer. Applying it directly to the skin could also provide positive results for those who have psoriasis. Fish oil is available in liquid form as well as capsules. If you’re worried about “fishy burps,” don’t worry, because there are supplements of the “burpless” variety, just make sure to check the label before purchasing so you get the right ones.

Collagen
When it comes to the skin, collagen is a protein that gives the skin its structure, firmness, and strength amongst other functions. According to theskincompany.com, every year after 29-years-old, we lose about 1-percent of collagen. It may not seem very significant, but when you do the math, it’s pretty alarming. There are studies being done to determine if collagen supplements actually work primarily because they have to travel through your body and make their way to the skin. However, if you are interested in seeing if it could work for you, it’s available in pill, powder, and juice form, and your dermatologist can give you good insight on which would be the best option for you.

Biotin
Found in foods like eggs and peanuts, biotin can be great for improving the health of your skin as it helps build up (healthy) fat. When your body lacks enough biotin, it could result in your skin developing a rash and getting flaky. It’s recommended that men and women who are 19 and over have 30 micrograms daily. In addition to being good for the skin, Biotin is also said to be excellent for hair and nails. Biotin supplements are available in capsule form and even the gummy variety. Additionally, there are dietary supplements that combine biotin and collagen together.

Now keep in mind before you head over to your nearest store to pick up one or more of the aforementioned dietary supplements that it’s vital that you speak with your doctor before taking any for your skin. It’s also important to first do your own research to find out what the side effects are to see if they’re even something you’re comfortable dealing with should they happen to you. Even though the aforementioned are naturally found in foods you eat very likely on a daily basis, you don’t want to take more or less than you should be taking without first speaking to a medical professional. A quick phone call to your doctor can answer many of your questions.