Tag Archives: Fish

Food sources

As the Temps Rise, So Does Your Need for Vitamin D

Poor Vitamin D! It was a perfectly respectable vitamin until the Urban Dictionary perverted it into a sexual euphemism. Now one can barely mention the vitamin without the occasional titter from those familiar with what it means to “put the D in someone.” In fact, even Marks and Spencer has come under fire for their claims of “Putting the D In Bread,” sparking a social media frenzy by those who can’t keep their minds out of the proverbial gutter.

The more mature among us will know vitamin D as a valuable nutrient for managing calcium in the blood, and assisting with intercellular communication. You may also know that this vitamin is primarily derived from the sun. However, if the sun is not an option, due to inclement weather, or simply lack of exposure, there are some foods that may be more consistent options.

Tuna Fish
Canned tuna is probably the cheapest and most accessible source of seafood, and a 3 oz. contains 236 IU of vitamin D: more than half the daily requirement. Sandwich or salad, tuna’s got the D.

Eggnog

Eggnog
There is no wrong time for eggnog. One glass contains 25% of the RDA of vitamin D, thanks to its large egg content. However, you may want to keep the consumption down to a minimum to avoid a sugar overload.

Fortified Dairy
Although most dairy does not contain significant amounts of vitamin D, the federal government began to fortify milk in the 1930’s due to a widespread deficiency in the nutrient. A single cup of fortified milk will get you 34% of the recommended daily value, while a 6-ounce container of fortified yogurt will give you one fifth of the RDA.

Mackerel
If you’re looking to pick up some Vitamin D, mackerel is quite the catch. Not only does one four ounce portion contain an entire day’s worth of vitamin-D requirement, it also has lower levels of mercury and is at less of a risk of overfishing than other fish with a similar nutritional profile. Mackerel is also rich in omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, and protein. Catch it if you can!

Portobello mushroom

Portobello Mushrooms
Portobello mushroom crops are exposed to additional lighting that boosts the amount of vitamin D by a whopping 3,000 percent. The increase of vitamin D intake due to lighting has also been shown to be a cost-effective way of lowering depression.

Smoked Whitefish
Kosher deli connoisseurs will know this fish as a great accompaniment to bagels, but they may not know that half a cup of this brunch staple contains enough vitamin D to get you through your day, It is also naturally low in calories and fat, and rich in vitamin D, protein, and B vitamins.

Soy Milk
You may be drinking soy milk to address issues of lactose intolerance, but if its fortified, you are also getting a daily dose of D. Most brands contain about one-quarter of the daily requirement.

Orange juice

Fortified Orange Juice
You may know orange juice to be a valuable source of vitamin C, but with fortification it can also be a significant source of vitamin D, with one cup exceeding a quarter of the daily recommended intake.

How are you getting your D? Let us know! We love to hear it, especially the dirty stuff!

Foods That Prevent Breakouts

So you really did it. Last night, you were watching SNL and you heard the siren’s call of the Ben and Jerry’s fudge core ice cream and you went to town. You walked over to the freezer- one person, one spoon, one mission: to eat the whole thing. And that’s exactly what you did, and now you’re staring at it. That big old zit -right in the middle of your forehead.

You heard that food doesn’t cause acne, hormones do, and you believe it, but every time you eat chocolate, there it is, the huge pimple serving to remind you and your friends how you spent your Saturday night for the rest of the week. If only you could undo it! Well, acne sufferers, while food may not cause acne, some foods may actually prevent it? While there is no evidence that you can make that pimple go away by gorging on the following, there is some proof that certain foods can lead to clearer skin.

1. Flaxseed Or Fish
Not to be confused with omega-6 fatty acids which can cause inflammation, omega-3 fatty acids can actually reduce inflammation and reduce acne breakouts. Omega-3 can be found in flaxseed, walnuts, and fatty fish.

woman drinking green tea 2. Green Tea
Green tea contains the powerful antioxidant EGCG. Researchers in South Korea applied an EGCG containing cream to rabbit ears and found it decreased the size of the sebaceous glands, which are commonly enlarged in acne sufferers. The antioxidant also was proven to reduce the production of sebum. A follow-up study on humans found that EGCG noticeably improved acne in a split face, 8-week trial. If drinking green tea throughout the day seems a bit challenging, try applying cool, moist tea bags or a green tea moistened cloth to affected areas for 10-15 minutes.

3. Oysters
Good for more than one thing, it seems. Oysters contain zinc, a mineral that has been shown in studies to reduce acne. It is recommended that acne sufferers get zinc from food rather than supplements, which can provide more that 100 mg of zinc per day, a dosage which may result in side effects. You are best off getting your zinc from oysters, veal liver, roast beef, roasted squash and pumpkin seeds, dried watermelon seeds and toasted wheat germ.

woman eating a juice 4. Juice
Juicing is the new black, and it can also clear up your acne. Dark, leafy green veggies, found in some juices, contain beta-carotenes which are anti-inflammatory and help reduce oil while clearing toxins to form the body.

5. Probiotics
Mostly known for their ability to reduce inflammation in the gut, it has now been hypothesized that probiotics may also reduce acne. Research has proven that those who suffered from reactions to toxins found in the gut were also likely to display acne symptoms. Because, prebiotics and probiotics are effective in fighting oxidative stress and inflammation, scientists think that they may also be effective against acne. Probiotics are most often found in kefir, sauerkraut, dark chocolate, miso soup, pickles, tempeh, and yogurt.

Mostly-Pescatarian Benefits

Salmon sashimi

Now that there are more vegan and vegetarian restaurants out there, more and more people are experimenting with eliminating or limiting meat from their diets.  There are pros and cons for every diet choice, and it is a very personal decision, so it’s best to try the things you’re interested in so you can figure out what works best for you! Although pescetarianism isn’t talked about quite as much as vegan or vegetarian diets, it definitely has its benefits, even if you’re eating pescatarian about three times a week! There are tons of reasons to cut down on meat consumption, and here are just a few of the benefits of getting your protein from fish.

It Can Help with Weight Loss
A pescatarian diet is perfect for someone who is trying to lose weight. You are probably eating more fruits and vegetables like vegetarians, but also getting plenty of lean protein. While it is definitely possible to get enough protein without any meat at all, pescatarians can easily consume a high amount of it without supplements, or foods high in fat like nuts or cheese. This is especially important for people who are following a weight loss plan because when you are working out, your body needs protein to refuel and build muscle. Adding more fish to your diet can also help you plan (and enjoy!) healthy, homecooked meals. There are so many different kinds of fish, and even more different ways to prepare it. You won’t have to worry about getting into a rut- there is always something new to try!

It’s Great for Your Overall Health!
In addition to helping with weight loss, eating fish can also improve your health overall! A huge benefit of eating fish and seafood is the high quantity of omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3s are the reason that people take fish oil supplements, and they are said to have numerous benefits. Some of the main claims are that eating fish helps reduce the risk of heart disease and diabetes, as well as improve joint health. Omega-3 fatty acids can help lower cholesterol, therefore improving circulation and reduce the risk of blood clots. Studies also show that they can help ease symptoms of inflammatory diseases. Finally, a pescatarian diet can promote healthy skin and hair- go omega-3s!

As if that wasn’t enough, fish ensures that you are getting enough iron. Some people, especially women, are prone to anemia, and eating iron rich foods is essential for preventing the fatigue, and other negatives effects, that come with an iron deficiency. Eating fish a few times a week can really improve your iron intake!

It’s Good for the Environment
No industry is perfect, but replacing a few meals a week (ones that are made with meat) with pescatarian meals can really have an impact on the environment. The amount of water and other resources needed to raise livestock, as well as the pollution it causes, are pretty convincing reasons to mix up your diet, and going pescatarian 3 or 4 nights a week is a great option!

Food For Collagen Building

You are what you eat. When it comes to skin and beauty, what you put into your body is just as important as what you put onto your body. Changing your diet can have impressive effects on your skin. As you age, your body naturally slows down the production of collagen, a protein responsible for keeping skin healthy, plump and young-looking. To combat the natural aging process, try adding the following five foods that help build collagen to your diet.

Red peppers.

Red Vegetables
Experts recommend consuming red vegetables for collagen building due to the lycopene contained within. Brooke Alpert, a New York based nutritionist, says “lycopene acts as a natural sunblock, protecting the skin from damage while increasing collagen levels.” A study published in the British Society for Investigative Dermatology reports similar findings. Subjects of the study who consumed tomato paste had 33% more protection from sun damage than a control group of participants. If tomatoes aren’t your thing, pick up other red vegetables like sweet red peppers, chili peppers or beets.

Salmon with herbs and lemons

Fish
“Fish like tuna and salmon are loaded with omega-3 fatty acid,” Alpert says. This benefits your skin, and collagen function, because cells are protected by a fatty membrane that surrounds them. With this fatty membrane in place, cells function properly and are able to fully support the skin structure. Aim to eat fish two to three nights per week to get your omega-3 fatty acids. Another excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids is walnuts, so you may want to keep those on hand for quick and healthy snacking.

Kale

Dark Green Vegetables
Dark green vegetables such as kale and spinach can help boost your collagen production. Orlando dermatologist, Dr. Dimitry Palceski, states “vitamin C has antioxidizing properties that stabilize the messenger enzymes that break down collagen. It also protects against free radicals to prevent weak collagen.” It’s quite easy to incorporate more dark green vegetables into your diet. Swap iceberg lettuce for more nutritious alternatives such as romaine, butterhead and arugula lettuces.

Soy

Soy
Soy contains plant hormones that serve as antioxidants known as genistein. Genistein helps to block enzymes that are harmful to collagen as well as prompting the production of collagen. Another reason to enjoy soy for great skin is the plant-derived compound isoflavones. A specific form of isoflavones called aglycones lessen visible signs of aging like fine lines and wrinkles. Tofu and tempeh are excellent sources of soy, and tempeh has tons of protein. However, you don’t have to love tofu to get soy in your diet. Substitute your regular or chocolate milk for soy milk or try a soy-based cheese on your next pizza.

White tea.

White Tea
You know that drinking green tea has some great health benefits, including some for your skin, but you might want to swap your green tea for white tea to help build collagen. A Kingston University London study looked at green tea skin benefits and white tea skin benefits and the data showed that white tea is estimated to have three to six times the amount of green tea when it comes to protecting the skin’s matrix. White tea is thought to protect the structural proteins of the skin, collagen included. Additionally, white tea adds antioxidant benefits that fight free radical damage.

Eating a well-rounded diet full of vitamins, minerals and other important nutrients may dramatically improve your skin from the inside out. When you incorporate the proper ingredients into your diet, your skin will reflect these healthy changes and become clearer, stronger and more radiant. The next time you take a trip to your grocery store, load up on these foods to protect your skin and help build collagen.