Tag Archives: face care

What To Look For In Natural Cosmetics

Woman with flowers

Does it ever seem odd that we pointedly avoid buying foods with any vaguely chemical sounding ingredients, but we actively search for them in our cosmetic products? Breyer’s Ice Cream brags of containing only five simple ingredients, yet we persist in putting a veritable cocktail of synthetic chemicals on our faces. Although it is true that many of the manmade skincare ingredients have proven harmless and effective, there has to be a certain amount of wisdom in the belief that the best things for our bodies come from the same place as our bodies do: the earth. With that in mind, let’s talk natural cosmetics and take a look at what you can do to keep green while you look beautiful.

Scale Down
While there seems to be a myriad of products to address each skin issue individually, some of them really have very similar formulations. Eye creams, for example, vary very little in consistency from basic facial moisturizers. If you are trying to scale down on the number of chemicals you are putting on your face, limit the amounts of products you are putting on your face. Try to limit your skincare routine to the basic essentials: cleanser, moisturizer, toner, and broad spectrum sunscreen.

Organic beauty products

Choose Organic Beauty Products
Organic ingredients are grown without the use of synthetic pesticides and fertilizers which make them a healthier choice for both our planet and out bodies. Even better are botanicals grown employing biodynamic farming methods. These take the green mentality one step further by putting emphasis on the holistic relationship between plants, soil, and animals. The USDA National Organic Program has been certifying organic skincare products since 2003, and an increasing number of formulas are now bearing the organic seal. Biodynamically certified products feature the Demeter USA’s approval stamp.

Know What’s Really In “Natural” Products
Many companies market skincare by slapping the word “natural” on the label; however, the words “natural” and “all-natural” are not regulated terms. To be sure, check out the Environmental Working Group’s Skin Deep Cosmetics Database site. This will tell you the level of toxicity in popular cosmetics products on a scale from 0 to 10.

No Fragrance
Besides the use of the word “natural” on product labels, federal law also overlooks the need for companies to state the toxic chemicals in a product’s fragrance mixture. Artificial fragrances can contain phthalates, which can trigger health problems and allergic reactions. Beware of products with “parfum” or “fragrance” on the label, as this could indicate hidden toxicity.

Healthy diet plan

Keep Healthy
Of course, a great way to get a natural glow without chemicals is by making sure you maintain healthy diet and exercise habits. Make a point to get the occasional workout in to keep the blood flowing to your skin, and eat plenty of healthy fats, like flaxseed and omega-3 fish oils, protein, fruits and complex carbohydrates.

Are you going natural with your cosmetics? Let us know how you’re greening up your routine. We love to hear it.

Upgrade Your Skincare Routine With Hyaluronic Acid

Woman at mirror

If you are one of the many searching for the fountain of youth in a bottle, you probably have something in your medicine cabinet with the words “hyaluronic acid” on the label. If so, you’re probably aware that there are other kinds of acids out there than the kind that burns your skin and the kind that blows your mind. Hyaluronic acid is one of the many ingredients to be included in the phenomena known as the “science of skincare.” This may be enough to qualify the ingredient as the worthwhile investment that it is, but it never hurts to do a little private investigating.

What is hyaluronic acid?
Hyaluronic acid is, in fact, a sugar molecule capable of retaining an impressive 500 to 1,000 times its weight in water (Doesn’t sound very comfortable). Our body produces it naturally, but the production slows down with age. When this happens, we may want to seek an outside source. Hyaluronic acid is used in serums and face creams to keep the skin plump, firm, and hydrated. The only problem is that the molecules used in most brands are too large to penetrate the layers of the skin and only offer a temporary fix.

Injectable Hyaluronic Acid
What many users may not know about hyaluronic acid is the fact that the only way for the hyaluronic acid to the deepest layers of the skin is by injecting it. Otherwise, it will still work, but it will sit on the surface of the skin. There it will work to decrease wrinkles, and draw moisture from the air, but the improvements will not be permanent. However, due to recent innovation in the topical use of the product, the effects may soon be able to yield longer lasting results. Intensifiers work around the size of the pores, using a cocktail of ingredients to encourage the skin to produce more of its own hyaluronic acid. Users report a 30 percent increase in hydration, although they do caution that it may take a few weeks before results become apparent.

Woman reading product label

Buying Hyaluronic Acid
When looking to buy products containing hyaluronic acid, you don’t always get what you pay for. Don’t let a high price fool you into thinking you’re buying a superior formula. Instead, as Randy Schueller, cosmetic scientist advises, “Always check the label and make sure hyaluronic acid is one of the first few ingredients.” This is the best way to ensure the dose of the ingredient is strong enough to have an effect. Be aware that hyaluronic acid may also appear on labels as hydrolyzed hyaluronic acid or sodium acetyl hyaluronate.

The Upshot
No matter how big the molecule, you should feel a difference, however short lived. But if you want the good stuff, you need to know where to look.

Have you or do you use hyaluronic acid as part of your routine? Let us know what you think? How permanent are the changes you experienced?

What Makes Argan Oil So Beneficial for Your Skin?

Argan oil is one of the most sought after culinary and cosmetic oils in the world. Here are some of the ingredients that make this oil so desirable and some of the ways you can take advantage of its benefits.

Argan Oil
Argan oil has been used as a healing oil throughout the centuries to treat skin conditions. The oil owes its healing properties to its high content of vitamin E and A and its wealth of antioxidants, such as omega -6 fatty acid and linoleic acid. Applied topically, the tocopherol from the vitamin E can boost cell production, promoting healthy skin and hair. Here are some of the top cosmetic uses for argan oil.

Argan oil

Night Time Moisturizer
After your nightly cleanser, pour a drop of argan oil in your palm to warm. Massage it into face and neck using a circular motion. Next, apply a drop to your face from the bridge of your nose to your temple using a tapping motion. Continue to use this gentle tapping to place a drop beneath your eyes. You will find the oil absorbs quickly without leaving a residue and that the A and E vitamins will help to reduce fine lines.

Skin Toner
To reap the benefits of argan oil in your toner, add two to four drops of the oil to eight ounces of toner or, follow this recipe to make your own chemical- free version:

Pour a cup of boiling water over a green tea bag and allow to steep for seven to ten minutes. Remove the bag and allow the tea to come to room temperature. Add a drop or two of an essential oil of your choice, add two to four drops of the argan oil and seal in a jar. Use twice daily after cleansing and before moisturizing.

face serum

Improving Acne-Prone Skin
Another benefit of argan oil is its ability to reduce sebum levels and fight acne. The high linoleic acid content can reduce inflammation due to acne while healing damaged skin cells. Simply apply a drop into problem areas, or fight whiteheads by making the skin toner (see above) using a few drops of tea tree oil. The tree tea oil will complement the argan oil with its supply of antioxidants, antiviral, antibacterial and anti-fungal properties.

Healing Stretch Marks
Argan oil helps restore elasticity to the skin lost to stretching. Warm two to three drops of the oil in your palms and rub on problem areas. The vitamin A and E will prevent stretch marks from forming. If you have already existing stretch marks, massage argan oil and brown sugar to the affected area before bathing. Rinse and reapply the oil to the area before dressing.

Caring for Your Nails
The non-greasy moisturizing agents in this oil make it ideal for treating nails and cuticles. Remove all traces of nail polish from hands and toes and dot a tiny drop into each nail, rubbing into cuticle and nail bed. Allow nails to absorb the oil, then rinse and apply polish as usual. Regular treatment should help your nails grow strong and beautiful, while preventing the formation of painful hangnails.

Have you used argan oil? Are the goats on to something? Their hair is fabulous and their hooves are really strong.