Tag Archives: dry skin

Use These Herbal Aids For Dry Skin

If there is anything to be learned from history, it is safe to say that people have always had a high respect for herbs. Elizabethan herbalist, Nicholas Culpepper credited plants with possessing powers of good (light) and evil (dark). That may explain why Chinese Emperor, and part time herbal enthusiast, Chi’en Nung, while able to identify 365 healing herbs, died after consuming one that turned out to be poisonous.

Despite the occasional mishap, it is safe to say that the herbal remedy has maintained a pretty respectable track record to this day, quite a feat considering how long its history is. Herbals have been credited with easing aches, pains, digestion problems and are also one of the most effective and trusted ingredients in beauty and skin products. If you are looking to give your skin a hydrating boost, here are some of the best (pretested) herbal remedies for dry skin relief.

avocado oil

Avocado Oil
It should be no surprise that a super food makes a super skin treatment. Avocado oil stimulates production of collagen and hydrates skin, and can even be used as a substitute for your nightly serum.

Rosemary Oil
Rosemary oil helps to stimulate cell renewal and gets rid of cells that dull the complexion to reveal new, fresh skin underneath. It can also be used to treat dry, itchy scalp and dandruff. Mix five to seven drops with luke warm water and use it to rinse hair after shampooing to address a flaky scalp.

Lavender Oil
Not only does it smell great, lavender can also relieve itchy tight skin and protect it from UV rays and free radicals which cause premature aging. Apply directly to your face, or put a few drops in your day or night cream.

Pomegranate seed oil

Pomegranate Seed Oil
The antioxidant properties in the pomegranate makes them a great anti-ager, whether you choose to munch or apply topically. The magical seeds can reduce breakdown and increase production of collagen to keep your skin looking firm and useful. Put a drop on your skin after applying moisturizer.

Grapeseed Oil
You’ve probably seen this ingredient being given credit on the labels of anti aging serums and creams. Grapeseed oil has been a proven component in the restoration of collagen and softens find lines to help skin stay firm. “Plus, according to David Colbert, MD, “grape seed oil is high in polyphenols which are antioxidants that can help calm inflammation.” Add two drops to your morning moisturizer to reap its anti aging benefits.

Sunflower Seed Oil
Got dry scaly elbows and knees? Slather some of this vitamin E rich oil on them for some quick hydration.

carrot seed oil

Carrot Seed Oil
Fight age spots with this bunny pleasing option, extracted from the dried seeds of the orange plant. Carrot seed oil can also speed up healing of skin irritations like psoriasis, dermatitis, and eczema.

Olive Oil
Besides being a delicious addition to food, olive oil can also be just the thing to relieve a dry, itchy scalp, due to its anti fungal and antibacterial properties. Ellen Marmur, MD, advises, “To calm either issue, once a week, massage a 1/4 cup of olive oils into your scalp so its evenly saturated. Wait at least 20 minutes, then shampoo and condition. Use the remainder to treat your complexion. Olive oil is rich in vitamins that can help prevent spots anilines caused by sun damage. Put two drops in your favorite moisturizer to boost results.

What herbal treatments work best on your dry skin? Let us know your favorites!

Add Apples To Your Overall Skin Care Routine

In language, history, folklore and mythology apple references abound. We routinely compare “apples to oranges,” we believe that ” an apple a day keeps the doctor away,” and we’ve all heard of the garden incident that caused the downfall of mankind. William Tell shot an apple from his son’s head, and apples also have the distinguished honor of sharing a name with the first child of Chris Martin and Gwyneth Paltrow.

Add Apples To Your Overall Skin Care Routine

Whether as a symbol of beauty and rebirth or temptation and sin, there is little doubt that the apple holds an important place in our history for many reasons. And now we can add a new one to the list: apples are great for the skin.

Apples for Skin Care
Apples are rich in nutrients known to benefit the skin. Copper maintains melanin production to keep the skin protected against the harmful rays of the sun. Vitamin C restores collagen levels, boosting elasticity and rebuilding collagen levels. Vitamin A rejuvenates damaged skin tissues and promotes skin cell growth.

Oily Skin Face Pack
If your skin, tends to be oily, combine a freshly squeezed teaspoon of lemon juice with a teaspoon of yogurt, and a teaspoon of grated apple. The lactic acid in the yogurt will absorb excess oil and brighten and moisturize skin. Apply the mixture to your face and let it sit for about 15 minutes, Rinse with lukewarm water, pat skin dry and apply moisturizer.

Apple mash

Sensitive Skin Face Pack
Got sensitive skin? There’s an app(le) for that. Boil a small apple until it’s tender and remove from hot water. Let it cool and peel it. Using a fork, mash the apple in a bowl. Add a teaspoon of ripe banana and a teaspoon of pure coconut cream. Mix to a smooth paste. Rub it into your skin and let it sit for twenty minutes. Use lukewarm water to rinse and pat dry.

Normal to Dry Skin
You can make a skin pack for normal to dry skin by combining a teaspoon of grated apple with a half teaspoon of organic honey. Mix to make a paste. Apply pack to your skin and allow to sit for about fifteen minutes. You can also use this recipe as a spot treatment for acne by applying the paste to the affected area and allowing to sit for twenty minutes.

Additional Benefits
Apples contain an exfoliating astringent that can help prevent acne and contains malic acid (AHA) for skin renewal. Apple cider vinegar can be used to relieve itching skin and scalp, regulate skin pH levels and exfoliate and soothe skin.

Apple cider vinegar

For Anti-Aging
A skin brightening, anti-aging mask can be made by combining a mashed apple with a teaspoon of orange, lemon, or grapefruit juice, one tablespoon of ground almond meal two crushed basil leaves and one tablespoon of cream, yogurt, or milk. Mash and apply to face. Leave on for 15 minutes, rinse and pat dry.

Are you using apples to maintain that glow? Let us know your apple skincare recipes. We love to share!

Selecting The Best Oils For Dry Winter Skin

Does anyone remember the 1986 Vaseline intensive Care commercial which starts with a woman saying “Sometimes your skin gets so dry, you can actually scratch the word “dry” right on your hand?” Then the camera pans down, and sure enough, there it is; D-R-Y written plain as day right on the woman’s flaky skin. Is that actually possible? If you’re suffering from dry skin this winter, it is not necessary that you put this barbaric practice to the test to realize it, but hopefully, you are able to do something to relieve it. Let’s talk about the best oils for dry winter skin.

coconut oil

Coconut Oil
Among the many benefits of coconut oil are its abilities to soothe sensitive skin and eczema and to moisturize dry hair. Joanna Vargas, celebrity facialist recommends it to her clients, straight from the grocery store as a body oil, adding that, “It’s fatty acids make it helpful for anyone with eczema.”

In addition, according to Perry Romanowksi, a Chicago cosmetic chemist, “It’s 12-carbon fatty acid structure allows it to penetrate the hair cuticle and provide flexibility and strength,” He instructs clients to use it on dry ends, to prevent flyways or for deep conditioning in the shower.

Argan Oil
Argan oil is best at banishing dry skin, dry hair, and reducing fine lines. Extracted from the fruit of Moroccan argan trees, argan oil is packed with omega-3 fatty acids, antioxidants and vitamin E. Joshua Zeichner, assistant professor of dermatology at the Mount Sinai Medical Center explains, “The fatty acids help our skin cells make healthy collagen, reduce inflammation, and promote healthy collagen.”

Avocado Oil
The emolliency of avocado oil makes it the perfect weapon against irritated, dry, and sensitive skin Jennifer Linder, MD, says, “The oil is high in Vitamin E and omega-3 fatty acids, which helps proper cell function and decreases inflammation.”

Lavender oil

Lavender Oil
A fragrant way of helping the acne or irritation prone skin, lavender oil helps to control the production of sebum and soothe skin irritation and also makes an excellent partner for other skin products. Linder says, “It is thought to help aid in the absorption of active ingredients into the skin.” he adds that lavender oil is also, “a natural antiseptic and disinfectant.”

Flaxseed Oil
Flaxseed oil has high levels of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids which makes it great for the heart, as well as the skin. Dr. Howard Sobel, MD., recommends it for his patients with sensitive irritated skin, or skin condition like dermatitis and eczema. He talks of its anti-inflammatory properties and mention studies that show that, “if taken daily, it can improve skin conditions such as eczema in just three months.”

Jojoba Oil
Pronounced ho-Ho-ba (accent on the Ho), jojoba oil is technically a wax. However, because its chemical structure is so similar to the natural oil in our skin, it is absorbed easily. It is best for general dryness and contains vitamins B and E, as well as mineral like copper and zinc to make skin stronger.

Olive oil

Olive Oil
Best for those with very dry skin, olive oil, especially extra virgin serves as a great all around natural moisturizer. Dr. Sobel says, “Its super rich in fatty acids and vitamin E. It is also well absorbed by our skin because of its similarity to our natural skin oils and studies show that it may be helpful in prevention of skin cancer.

Get your natural glow on this winter and tell us how you keep your season bright! We love to hear from you!

Avoiding Eczema Flare Ups

eczema

In the book, “We Need To Talk About Kevin” by Lionel Shriver, one of the many diabolical acts Kevin, the narrator’s evil son, undertakes is encouraging a young girl, Violetta, to viciously gouge her eczema inflicted skin after years of strict abstinence. In the book, Shriver gives one of the most vivid and haunting descriptions of the condition, writing that it, “itches like fury.” She describes little Violetta clutching her anti- itch ointment, although, “those antipruritics are only so effective anther self-control was impressive. She’d trace a fingernail tantalizingly over her arm and they grasp the offending hand with the other as if putting it on a leash.”

Shriver may or may not have ever known the experience of eczema, but, she surely puts it into perspective for those of us who haven’t. Eczema is a condition causing red, swollen and itchy patches of skin. There are many things in the environment that can trigger eczema and recognize and avoid them are key in keeping flare ups to a minimum.

The Cold
Cold weather is no friend to eczema sufferers. Low temperatures cause the skin to become dry and prone to breakouts. Be sure to have moisturizing ointments handy in the winter and use a humidifier to combat dry air indoors. Try to keep humidity levels between 45 and 55 percent.

Clothing
Synthetics, wool, and rough materials have been known to trigger eczema. Loose- fitting cotton is preferable. Always wash clothes before wearing them to get rid of excess dye and irritants and cut out tags.

Detergent
Try to use a pH neutral, fragrance-free detergent and use the double rinse cycle to make sure you get all of the soap out of your clothes. Look for natural household cleansers and wear rubber gloves when cleaning.

woman smiling in cold weather

Dust Mites
Dust mites can trigger eczema flare-ups, particularly in small children. Made sure you get rid of dust magnets in your child’s room, like carpeting, rugs, and blinds. Wash sheets and curtains in hot water once a week and keep the room clean.

Stress
While it can never be totally avoided, excess stress may be eliminated with yoga and deep breathing. Relaxation will help to send your eczema plan in the right direction.

Food Allergies
For those who suffer from atopic dermatitis, the most common form of eczema, food allergies can trigger to the appearance of symptoms. Food allergies can be diagnosed with skin pricks and blood tests, however, the only way to know if your food is really the trigger is to have the doctor witness what happens after you eat the food, not a very enticing prospect. You must take the food challenge to know for sure.

Cosmetics
If you are a makeup maven who has eczema, finding the right products can be a challenge. Try to avoid products with alcohol, lanolin, preservatives and perfume. Keep in mind the “unscented” label does not necessarily mean there is no fragrance; the fragrance may just be masked. “Fragrance-free” is a better guarantee, choose products with this on the label instead. Also, always test out a new cosmetic on a small patch of skin before deciding whether or not it is for you.

Pets
Unfortunately, Skippy and Fluffy may have to sleep outside for a while and they better keep off the furniture. Vacuuming can help keep down pet dander, a leading eczema trigger, as can regular grooming and bathing of pets.

Benefits of Topical Vitamin E

Vitamins

With the recent inundation of skin products on the market, some of the more natural options are sometimes overlooked. Vitamin E is a necessary part of the skin’s antioxidant defense. It is remarkably safe and can be taken in quantities as high as 3200 IU per day, more than 100 times the US RDA. Vitamin E is a necessary part of the skin’s antioxidant defenses.  It has been shown to have an oxygen sparing effect on the heart, break sown blood clots and prevent more from forming  and promote healing of skin with less scar tissues and protect against UV rays and free radical damage.

It should be mentioned that Vitamin e in its most natural form is called D-alpha with mixed natural tocopherols.  There  are synthetic versions that are cheaper and less effective so if you want the real thing, look for D-alpha tocopherol on the label.

Uses of Topical Vitamin E

On Burns
You can drip Vitamin E on burnt skin by applying oil directly  or splitting the Vitamin capsule open.  Vitamin E is capable of healing even 3rd-degree burns.  Twice daily applications are recommended and skin should be dry before applying.  The burn should heal with less scarring and inflammation.

For sunburns, you can mix some 400 IU capsules with olive oil.  Not only will your burn fade painlessly, but it will minimize peeling.  Individuals also credit Vitamin E with hemorrhoid relief.

As A Night cream
Dab a little vitamin E oil under your eyes after you remove your makeup. Your under eye skin will be super strong.  It also reduces the chance of cheek wrinkle, which is a large fold that appears when you move the cheek toward the eye. Vitamin E also  safeguards the eyes from dark circles.

As An Anti-Aging Product
The anti-aging effects of natural products are generally slow, so persistence will pay off in the use of vitamin E as an anti-aging product.  In the form of gamma tocotrienol , Vitamin E can reverse damage from UVB radiation and free radicals, causing reduction of brown spots.

Apply After A Shower
Absorbs in minutes for skin like a baby! Vitamin E oil usually contains coconut oil, making a dynamite duo for dry skin, but as an added bonus Vitamin E also helps your skin to produce its own oil.  Vitamin E regulates the function of oil releasing glands, making it a perfect moisturizer.

Heals Any Scars
Vitamin E is known for its ability to heal injured skin tissues, You can apply it on pigmentation scars,  acne scars or scars made by cuts, wounds or surgery.

Gets Rid of Dry and Dull Skin
Take the ‘gets rid of’ part literally,  not only can it reduce dryness and flakiness,  after regular application Vitamin E concentration may actually reach a point in which it will keep working after discontinuing use.

Smooths Tangle Free Hair No more ouch!  Your days of yanking and pulling are over. Add vitamin E to a regular shampoo makes hair texture silky and smooth. In addition, Vitamin E nourishes the scalp keeping it healthy and moisturized, preventing dandruff.

There is no denying that there are some great products out there, but sometimes the best solution is the simplest.   Vitamin E is  harmless and  easily accessible at pharmacies.

The Best Oils for Your Skin Type

Essential oil

Even though oils have been used for centuries as skincare, it’s only been in the last few years that oils have become super mainstream and widely available. If you’ve been hesitant to try oils in the past, or if you’ve tried an oil and been less than impressed with the results, this post is for you. As with any other skincare product, different facial oils suit different skin types and our guide below helps you to find the oils that are best suited for your specific skin type.

Acne-Prone
While acne-prone skin often is oily, this isn’t always the case. You may have sensitive or dry skin and still experience acne. Putting oil on a face suffering from breakouts may seem a bit scary, but there are oils available that will soothe and help reduce your breakouts. One of the determining factors in whether or not an oil will benefit acne-prone skin is the ratio of oleic acid and linoleic acid. Oleic acid is a monounsaturated fat, or omega-9 fatty acid while linoleic acid is unsaturated fat, or omega-6 fatty acid. An abstract for a study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology states, “acne patients have also been shown to have low levels of linoleic acid in their skin surface lipids.” Sebum produced by your oil glands is largely oleic acid, so using an oil high in linoleic acid helps balance your skin. Oils that work best for acne-prone skin include hemp seed oil, rosehip seed oil, grape seed oil, evening primrose oil and safflower oil.

Hemp seed oil.

Oily Skin
Putting oil on oily skin seems like a bad idea, but as you learned above, the sebum from your pores is completely different than plant oils. When people have oily skin, the tendency is to use harsh products like exfoliators and toners with alcohol, because at first these seem to remove oil from the skin. The problem with using these types of products is that you are damaging your skin’s lipid barrier, which works to keep good things like moisture in and harmful pollutants out. When you damage the lipid barrier, your skin senses it is imbalanced and it needs more moisture, and it will attempt to moisturize itself by producing more sebum. So, the harsher products can actually not only be ineffective, but they do the exact opposite of what you’re looking for them to do. Pure plant oils help to repair and maintain the lipid barrier of your skin. Oils that tend to work well for oily skin are hemp oil, rosehip seed oil, evening primrose oil, jojoba oil and avocado oil.

Dry Skin
When it comes to dry skin you want an oil that will really penetrate and add moisture to your skin. Oils like rosehip seed and hemp seed oil are relatively dry oils and they may be a bit too drying for skin that is naturally dry. Dry skin needs oils that have a good blend of omega fatty acids including omega-3, omega-6 and omega-9 fatty acids. If you have dry skin you also need an oil that is going to hydrate your face for hours at a time and that will help your skin to retain moisture. Oils that benefit dry skin include aloe vera oil, argan oil, olive oil, grape seed oil and vitamin E oil.

Aloe vera oil.

Normal and Combination Skin
Combination skin commonly features an oily T-zone area and dry skin elsewhere on the face and oils are particularly great for combination skin because they help balance your skin. Normal skin is generally fairly balanced on its own, so your facial oil will be more for hydration than about making sure that everything is evened out on your skin. Oils that work really well for normal and combination skin are grape seed oil, tamanu oil, carrot seed oil and aloe vera oil.

The idea of oil on your face may still scare you, but if you find the right oil, you will never look back when it comes to moisturizing your skin. Oils are available at a wide variety of price points, but it is worth noting that sometimes you do get what you pay for. When choosing your facial oil, you want to be sure that it is as natural and organic as possible, which usually means looking for an oil that is unrefined and cold-pressed. Oils that are refined are less pure and are more likely to include undesirable additives. Next time you’re looking for a moisturizer, reference this guide to find the oil that will work best for you.

Ingredients to Help With Dry, Flaky Skin

Dry, flaky skin is the last accessory you want for your holiday parties but when the temperature drops your skin often reacts by losing moisture. There is less moisture in the air and you’re constantly going in between extreme temperatures from hot to cold and back again. Even if you don’t have dry skin to begin with you, you may find yourself experiencing rough, flaky patches of skin. The following four ingredients hydrate, exfoliate and keep your skin looking smooth and healthy.

Woman enjoying milk bath

AHA/ BHA
Exfoliating your skin may be the last thing on your mind when you are experiencing flaky skin, but it is important to do so. Scrubs can be too harsh on dry skin, but using gentle alpha hydroxy acids (AHAs) or beta hydroxy acid (BHA) exfoliates your skin without being too rough. Two great AHAs for dry and flaky skin are glycolic and lactic acids. Glycolic acid is derived from sugar cane and has a bit more potency than lactic acid. Lactic acid can come from plant sources, but most commonly it is a by-product of sour milk. Both of these acids reduce the bonds that hold dead skin cells to your skin, but glycolic acid is a smaller molecule, which means that it can penetrate your skin more deeply and help stimulate collagen production. Salicylic acid, or BHA, is another chemical exfoliant that encourages cell turnover and regeneration and is typically suggested for those with oily or acne-prone skin.

Hyaluronic Acid
Like glycerin, hyaluronic acid is a humectant that draws moisture from the air to your face. Hyaluronic acid is one of the greatest hydrating ingredients because it can hold roughly 1,000 times its weight in water. Like glycerin, hyaluronic acid adds moisture while also preventing loss of hydration by enhancing your skin’s barrier function. Hyaluronic acid not only helps your skin feel more hydrated, but it makes your skin appear more plump and supple.

Glycerin soap.

Glycerin
Glycerin is a superstar for skin that is dry or flaking because it is able to attract moisture to your skin and keep it there. Glycerin hydrates your skin in addition to filling in any gaps in your skin’s barrier, through which moisture can leave your skin. This barrier serves as protection not only against future moisture loss, but also to keep environmental pollutants or irritants from damaging your skin.

Squalane
Squalane is an oil that occurs naturally in your body and is also present in the livers of certain sharks and olive oil. Although squalane is produced by your body, the amount produced slows as you age with a significant drop occurring after age thirty. Squalane is thought to be particularly beneficial for restoring your skin’s proper balance of oils and moisture because it creates a barrier between your skin and the environment, keeping good things in while keeping bad things out. This oil does not have the traditional oily feel and is non-comedogenic, meaning that it won’t clog your pores. Squalane is non-irritating, making it safe for sensitive skin, but it also works well for acne-prone skin as it is thought to have antibacterial properties and can help soothe redness and inflammation while protecting against peeling and flaking.

While dry, flaky skin in the winter is a common occurrence, it is still incredibly frustrating to deal with. A consistent skin-care routine that uses a combination of hydrating ingredients is your best defense against problematic winter skin. Our four favorite skin-care ingredients for dry, flakey skin work to remove dead skin, add hydration and lock moisture into your skin.

Top Ingredients for Your Skin Type

The major skin types that people have include normal, dry, oily and combination. Normal skin is the most rare while oily can be the most difficult to remedy through topically applied products. Using the proper skin care ingredients for your skin type helps give you the clear, beautiful skin you want.

Vine-Vera-Top-Ingredients-for-Your-Skin-Type-Normal-Skin

Normal
Normal skin is the exception rather than the rule, and many people who have normal skin deal with normal skin plus a concern or two. You most likely have normal skin if your skin is not oily or dry and if you do get small spots of oily or dry skin they are quick and easy to remedy. Normal skin has a fairly even skin tone with no major brown or red spots and your pores are neither invisible nor enlarged.

The best way to care for normal skin is to avoid products labeled for other skin types: oily skin care products will be too drying while dry skin care products will have too much moisture. Look for products with gentle, but effective ingredients. Antioxidants are important ingredients for all skin types, and normal skin benefits from vitamins A, C and E. Though normal skin is not oily, you still need to exfoliate normal skin regularly to remove any dead skin cells or other debris that may accumulate. The best exfoliant for normal skin is an alpha hydroxy acid, which is a gentle chemical exfoliant. An AHA exfoliant also reduces the appearance of wrinkles and increases collagen production.

Cosmetic cream and strawberries on a wooden table.

Dry
The common perception is that dry skin suffers from a lack of moisture, but this is not entirely true. Rather, dry skin has lost its ability to maintain normal levels of moisture as the skin’s barrier response has been weakened. To best take care of dry skin, it is important to look for ingredients that help the skin to retain a healthy water balance. Rid your skin care routine of anything that contains a rough scrub, use your fingers rather than a harsh cleansing brush and drying ingredients such as alcohol.

Dry skin requires some extra attention and delicate care. Many times those with dry skin can skip cleansing altogether as soaps, particularly in bar form, can be incredibly drying. Splash some warm water over your face and cleanse using a gentle AHA exfoliant. Look for moisturizers packed with antioxidants such as vitamin E and consider the use of intensive serums or plant oils. Plant oils such as jojoba and olive oils can be extremely helpful to dry skin.

Woman cleansing her face.

Oily
Oily skin is perhaps the hardest type of skin to deal with because it is caused by hormones which are genetically determined. The hormones responsible for oil production are androgens and while they are considered the “male hormone,” they are present in both males and females. You have oily skin if your face becomes shiny about two hours after cleansing and continues to become increasingly “greasy” throughout the day. Additionally, people with oily skin often have enlarged pores due to the increase in oil production.

While it may seem like a good idea to dry out oily skin, this can make your skin produce even more oil. Rather than using harsh ingredients like alcohol, look for gentle cleansers with ingredients such as salicylic acid. This helps combat oil, and any resulting acne, without being too drying on the skin. Use of a toner after cleansing can help oily skin and looking for one with antioxidants such as vitamin C (ascorbic acid) can provide great benefits. Be sure to exfoliate and again salicylic acid, or BHA exfoliant, is great for clearing away dead skin cells and unclogging pores.

Witch Hazel

Combination
Combination skin is difficult for people to deal with and recognize. Combination skin occurs when you face two or more skin types at one time. Often, some part of the skin is dry and flaky while other parts of the skin are oily. Generally, this manifests as an oily T-zone, where the forehead, nose and chin are oilier than the rest of the face.

Use a gentle cleanser and avoid bar soaps for combination skin. Again, look for a toner but be sure that it does not include any irritating ingredients such as citrus oils, alcohols or witch hazel. Salicylic acid is a great ingredient and can be used as a regular exfoliant to keep the T-zone clean and clear. If your skin is particularly dry, then you may want to skip the BHA (salicylic acid) toner and switch to an AHA exfoliant. Use heavy moisturizers or anti-acne medications as spot treatments rather than applying to the entire face.

Treating your unique skin type with the ingredients that it needs ensures you have the healthiest skin possible. Remember to use sunscreen daily no matter what type of skin you have as it provides necessary protection against harmful UV rays. A regular routine of cleansing, exfoliating and moisturizing helps all skin types stay looking youthful and radiant.

Vine Vera on Vitamins A Benefits for Dry Skin

vitamin a benefits

Vitamin A, or Retinyl Palmitate as it may appear on your skin care product ingredient list, works on multiple levels of skin care. Of the many Vitamin A benefits for the skin, the vitamin is probably most recognized for its acne-fighting abilities by shrinking the size of the oil-producing glands of the skin, reducing the amount of oil they produce. Since breakouts happen when too much oil blocks the follicle (which happens to share space with the oil gland), a vitamin that decreases oil production is essential to fighting, preventing, and treating acne.

But Vitamin A also has anti-aging effect on the skin. It slows down the deterioration of collagen, or the protein that forms the framework for the dermis layer of the skin. Without collagen holding everything in place, the skin begins to sag and wrinkle. Age causes the natural loss of collagen, so any vitamin that slows down this progression will allow you to look younger for longer.

As an antioxidant, Vitamin A helps the body stop the damaging effects of oxidation caused by free radicals. When free radicals become too abundant, they start a chain reaction that could damage cells and ultimately change your DNA. Antioxidants like Vitamin A are equipped to stop the free radical domino effect of skin damage.

Besides decreasing acne, increasing collagen and producing antioxidants, Vitamin A benefits also include treating and preventing dry skin. Some individuals may have perpetually dry skin while others can attribute their condition to environmental factors. 

The weather, both hot and cold, can cause dry skin. During the winter, the weather is cold and windy with very little or no humidity. A lack of humidity in the air means that your skin will quickly dry out whenever you are out in the elements. And although the warmer weathers tends to bring out the humidity, other summer time factors will dry out your skin, such as time spent out in the sun or being indoors with your air conditioner, which causes the humidity level in your house to plummet, along with the moisture level in your skin.

If you are not careful, even your own skin care routine could dry out your skin.  Some products not only clean the skin of excess oil, old skin cells and dirt, but will strip it of essential oils as well. If you have dry skin to begin with, this could irritate your complexion.

Vitamin A deficiency affects the skin directly because it reduces the health of your epithelial tissue which leads to dry skin. It isn’t simply something you should take to treat dry skin, but it is essential to preventing it.

If you want your skin care products to work for your skin in more ways than one, make sure that tap the amazing Vitamin A benefits by making sure the ingredient Retinyl Palmitate is included on the ingredient list of your favorite Vine Vera product. The restorative power of this naturally occurring vitamin simply cannot be beat.