Tag Archives: Dermatologist Recommendations

vine vera Know When To See A Doctor For An Acne Rx

Know When To See A Doctor For An Acne Rx

If you have acne, it’s bad, and, chances are, no matter how long it takes to go away, it’s not fast enough. You probably want to seek prescription strength medication and customized advice ASAP, but, a consultation with doctor or dermatologist can be expensive and inconvenient, and not always necessary. Could there be such a thing as acne hypochondriacne? Are your zits really worthy of a doctor’s visit, or are you simply having an overly dramatic response to a common rite of passage? If your acne is turning to a source of preoccupation you the idea of seeking professional help has crossed your mind, here are some things to consider to help you make up your mind.

The OTC Gels and Creams No Longer Work
If you’re using drugstore medications containing benzoyl peroxide or salicylic acid, you can expect mild or moderate acne to go away within four to six weeks. If it takes longer than that, a doctor’s visit may be necessary. Illinois dermatologist Amy Derick says, “Oral therapies like antibiotics, birth control, or isotretinoin can also be described for deeper acne spots and hormonal breakouts (pimples which never come to a head).”

Another thing to consider is the fact that sometimes breakouts can occur from using the wrong drugstore products. As a general guideline, if you have oily skin, wash your face twice daily with a cleanser containing salicylic acid. For dry skin, a gentle foaming cleanser is recommended. Use a topical spot treatment with benzoyl peroxide to apply directly to blemishes. If you don’t see an improvement after six weeks, you may want to consider booking a dermatologist’s appointment.

vine vera Know When To See A Doctor For An Acne Rx

The Acne Is Affecting Your Self Esteem
It’s hard to suffer from acne without it taking a toll on your self-esteem. Skin disorders can lead to depression and anxiety disorders in teens as well as adults. In fact, according to a study published in the British Journal of Dermatology, acne sufferers experience psychological, emotional, and social problems mimicking those of individuals with health problems, such as arthritis, epilepsy, and diabetes.

If you find yourself avoiding social activities because of your breakouts, it may be time to schedule a visit with a dermatologist. He or she can help you deal with your acne in a timely, healthy way.

Pimples are Sore and Leave Scars
Cystic acne and nodules are the toughest types of acne to treat. Cystic acne refers to inflammation caused by damage to the follicle wall, while nodules are painful masses that coagulate under the skin. Dr. Derek sys, “If you suffer from more serious forms of acne-like cystic acne, over the counter treatments will never be enough, and waiting is just delaying the inevitable trip to the dermatologist.

Those with cystic acne and nodules should resist the urge to pop pimples, which can lead to permanent damage. Your dermatologist can administer a corticosteroid injection into the lesions, then he or she can prescribe a regimen appropriate to your skin type and severity of your condition.

Have you seen a professional for your acne? What tipped the scale for you? Let us know when you think acne warrants a Rx visit.

Dermatologist Recommendations For Storing Beauty Products

Woman with cosmetics storage

Are you a makeup hoarder? If you have eye shadows colors that only a teenager can get away with and you’re over the age of 30, the answer is probably “yes.” Whether it’s an attachment issue, or if you’re just sort of lazy, expert advice says, “Out with the old,” and it’s not just a backlash against hoarding. Apparently, there are certain guidelines when it comes to storing your cosmetics and, if your safety is a concern, you may want to know them.

Storing Cosmetics
Cosmetic products should remain safe for a reasonable amount go time, provided they are properly stored. That means makeup should be kept in a dry, cool place, without exposure to direct sunlight and the lids securely closed. Hands should be clean before putting fingers into products for application and sharing makeup is not advisable.

Product Deterioration
Once you open your makeup, it becomes exposed to dirt and microorganisms, such as yeasts, mold and bacteria found on applicators, brushes, and in the air. Although most cosmetics contain preservatives to kill the microorganisms, the efficacy of these additives can decrease with time and increased exposure to air. If contaminated, use of these products can cause irritation or infection of the skin. Products must be checked regularly to prevent this from occurring.

FDA Rules
There are no US laws requiring cosmetics to have expiration dates. The FDA considers the shelf life of cosmetics to be part of the responsibility of the manufacturer. Sunscreen and acne products, which are considered to be drugs under law, are subject to regulation and are required to have expiration dates on the label.

Cosmetics on dressing table

Shelf Life
So how long should you hold on to your product? In the UK, products with a shelf life of less than two and a half years a required to be labelled with a best before date, however dating is not common, due to the fact that most cosmetics have a shelf life exceeding two and a half years. However, eye area cosmetics usually have the shortest shelf lives in the cosmetic family and manufacturers tend to recommend discarding mascara two to four months after it is purchased because mascara is exposed to fungi and bacteria with ever usage, and becomes unsafe quickly.

How Do I Know If A Product Is No Longer Safe?
If you come across makeup that has not had a lid on it for a long period of time, you should probably toss it, regardless of the expiration date. Check products for suspicious smell, color, or texture. Lumpy discolored makeup may not do its job properly and could be risky to someone with preexisting skin conditions.

Useful Tips

  • Read instruction and warnings carefully.
  • Keep lids on products and use products within recommended time period.
  • Avoid storing cosmetics in direct sunlight or near heat sources. Choose cool, dry areas when possible.
  • Do not mix or dilute products with other products unless instructed.
  • Make sure all applicators or hands are clean before applying cosmetics. Wash applicators regularly with detergent, soap, or mild shampoo.
  • Make sure applicators dry completely before use.
  • Avoid sharing cosmetics.

How do you store your cosmetics? Do you still have your punk rock purple lipstick from the eighties? Let us know what shocking things you discovered weeding through your old makeup! We love to hear from you!