Tag Archives: Colors

Avoid These Toxic Food Additives

Woman reading food label

“Toxic Waste Nuclear Sludge Chew Bar,” the Hazardously Toxic Candy. According to the package, if you can hold the Pakistani candy import in your mouth for 60 seconds, you’re a “Full Toxic Head. ” If you can hold it in your mouth for 45 seconds, you’re a “Toxic Wannabe.” Thirty seconds and you’re a “Crybaby,” and 15 seconds makes you a “Total Wuss.” And according to the FDA, zero seconds makes you really smart. In 2013, the Food and Drug Administration found that the Toxic Waste candy line really was toxic and was recalled from store shelves for excessively high lead content. Who would have guessed?

Although no one could accuse the company of false advertising, not all foods announce their toxic contents on their labels. Here are some toxic food additives that you should beware of.

Artificial Sweeteners
Most of us know that sugar is harmful, but the sweeteners we replace them with may be even worse. The American Heart Association says the best plan of action is to stick with the real stuff, but limit your intake. Men should keep daily sugar consumption to 9 teaspoons while women should aim for no more than five, while children’s sugar intake should be limited to three teaspoons per day.

Natural sugar substances with health benefits are also available, such as stevia, honey, and agave nectar.

The naughty list of artificial sweeteners include aspartame, aceslfame potassium, saccharin, and sugar alcohols. These are often found in sugar free desserts, gum, sugar substitutes, and diet soda.

Apple injected with syringes

Chemical Preservatives
Although some food companies manage to keep food shelf stable with methods such as freezing, drying, and canning, this is not always the case. Twinkies owe their longevity to a host of chemicals.

If you want to determine whether the food items you are buying are being chemicals preserved, look out for butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene(BHT), and propyl gallate. These additives are usually found in cereal, gum, potato chips, soups, meats, oil and are potential carcinogens. Sodium nitrate, found frequently in cured meat, such as bacon, corned beef, and hot dogs, has been linked to pancreatic and stomach cancers.

Unnatural Flavor Enhancers
Artificial flavor enhancers are used when chemically altered and preserved foods need to taste good. As usual, the real stuff is preferable and small amounts of real fats and oils are recommended over large amounts of additives.

Artificial and natural flavors can be found in most things and are non nutritive. Partially hydrogenated oils are usually in products including margarine, baked goods, bread, frosting, and crackers and create trans fats which can raise cholesterol and increase heart disease risk. Olestra, or olean, is an additive often found in”light” chips and can cause gastrointestinal distress.

Woman checking label

Artificial Colors
Attractive as they may be, artificial colors have been linked to tumors, allergic reactions and hyperactivity in children. They are often found in foods with little nutritional value to begin with, so it’s probably best to avoid them entirely.

Chemical Stabilizers
Chemical stabilizers help to give texture to processed foods and are often present in food mixes, such as pudding mix. Gums are chemical stabilizers often found in dough, drinks, ice cream, pudding, cheese, and candy and can cause severe allergic reactions. Potassium Bromate is a dough stabilizer which has been linked to cancer.

What have you been doing to avoid toxic food intake? Let us know what toxic foods we should be avoiding!

Colors and Skin Care – Vine Vera Reviews

Skin care and the perfection for perfectly smooth, blemish and hair free skin seems to be a never ending quest for many. We all seek the skin we see on the covers of magazines and on our television screens, though we know that the standard of beauty these photoshopped and edited images are impossible. The good news is that skin care is constantly evolving to keep up with the media’s portrayal of us. Vine Vera believes that one of the areas of skin care that continues to grow both in availability and popularity is laser therapy.

Woman getting laser therapy done from a professional expert.

What is Laser Therapy?
The word laser is an acronym that stands for light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation. Essentially, lasers are sources of single-wavelength high-energy light. Because of this, lasers are used to target and treat specific skin concerns from the smallest blemish to removing all of your leg hair. We perceive most light as white, though it is actually composed of a multitude of colors. Lasers are able to emit only one wavelength of concentrated light which allows the laser to destroy pigmentation of tissue while allowing the surrounding skin to remain unaffected.

Woman getting a laser therapy done in a spa.

Lasers and Cosmetic Procedures
According to the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, one of the most popular laser treatments is laser resurfacing. The American Society for Dermatologic Surgery defines this procedure as one that makes the use of a laser in order to treat minor facial flaws or improve the appearance of skin by removing layers of skin. Two of the most common types of lasers used in cosmetic procedures are carbon dioxide, CO2, lasers and erbium lasers. Carbon dioxide lasers emit an infrared light and can be used to correct multiple skin care concerns. Some of the uses of a CO2 laser include:

  • Acne scarring
  • Birthmark removal
  • Wart removal
  • Skin tag removal
  • Mole removal
  • Skin cancer
  • Sun damage
  • Deep set wrinkles
  • Sagging skin

Erbium lasers are used to:

  • Acne scarring
  • Sun damage
  • Skin pigmentation concerns
  • Mole removal
  • Treat fine lines and wrinkle

Doctors have a myriad of lasers at their disposal, and you want to choose a doctor whose office features several kinds of lasers. This ensures that your specific concerns can be targeted by your doctor.

Woman enjoys a light therapy session at a spa.

Light Therapy
There is also quite a bit of buzz surrounding the use of light therapy in your own home. Two of the most common at-home skin care treatments include blue light therapy and red light therapy.

Red light therapy is used in the treatment of skin concerns such as eczema, psoriasis, acne, sun damage and fine lines and wrinkles. This therapy improves the skin’s barrier function by helping the skin retain elements that are essential to the skin’s ability to heal and generate collagen production. Additionally, red light LEDs are believed to target oil glands and reduce cytokines, an anti-inflammatory substance responsible for acne.

Blue light therapy works by using specific wavelengths of blue light to eliminate the bacteria responsible for causing acne. Blue light therapy also increases the production of oxygen radicals which results in clearer skin. There are multiple handheld devices available for blue light therapy. This type of light therapy works best for those with mild to moderate acne.

Woman treating her skin to some light therapy at home.

Though there are both red and blue light therapy devices available for use at home, it is important to note that the results will not be the same as those achieved by a doctor. Federal regulations require that devices for home use use a significantly lower intensity than those you would receive in a medical office. Consult with a doctor prior to making a purchase and do thorough research to ensure you are buying not only a safe but also an effective product.