Tag Archives: Bone Health

Benefits of Adding Lemon and Lemon Peel To Your Diet

lemon peel

Nowadays, when life hands you lemons, there are a myriad of beneficial things you can do with them, and making lemonade does not even come near the top of the list. Here are just some of the ways adding lemons and lemon peels to your diet can help improve your health.

Benefits of Using the Whole Lemon

More Vitamins
Lemon peels contain 5 to 10 times more vitamin than the lemon juice alone. If you’re discarding the peel, you’re discarding loads of Vitamin A, Vitamin C, folate, calcium, beta-carotene, potassium, and magnesium.

Fights Cancer
If you’re thinking of doing a lemon juice cleanse, it may be more effective if you include the peel. Lemon peels help to eradicate the toxic elements in your body, including the carcinogenic ones. The peel contains salvestrol Q40 and limonene, components which are fierce defenders against the cancerous cells in your body. In addition, the flavonoids in the zest of the lemon can also be effective in stopping cancer cells from multiplying.

Additionally, a study reveals that drinking hot tea with lemon peel can help to prevent the development of colon, breast, and skin cancers.

Woman cutting up lemon

Boosts Bone Health
Because lemon peels contain loads of calcium and vitamin C, including them in your diet can help prevent bone conditions like rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, and inflammatory polyarthritis.

Lowers Cholesterol
High levels of “bad cholesterol” are often linked to cardiovascular disease. The polyphenol flavonoids in lemon peels will help the lower the LDL, or “bad” cholesterol levels in your body. In addition, Vitamins C and P will clear blood vessels, decreasing or preventing the risk of developing related conditions such as heart disease, diabetic heart disease, and high blood pressure.

Including Lemon Peel In Your Diet
So now that you know how great lemon peel is for you, you’re probably wondering how you can make it a little more palatable. Here are a few ideas for including lemon peel in your recipes.

Lemon Pickle
Widely found in Indian households, including a little lemon pickle in your diet is a great way to get the health benefits of the lemon zest.

lemon cake

Cakes and Pies
Scrape a little lemon peel into cakes and pies to enhance flavor before baking and add some to give the icing on top a tangy flavor.

Candied Lemon Peels
Making candied lemon peels is a fun and easy way to reap the lemon peel benefits. Boil the peel in some water to reduce bitterness. Extract peel and addict to a pot of sugar and hot water. Simmer until peels soften. Sprinkle sugar on top and let them dry for a day or two.

So, when life hands you lemons. eat them whole, or at least, eat the whole thing. Let us know how you’re including lemons and their peels in your diet.

Foods That Improve Joint and Tissue Health

Although many products claim to relieve joint pain, many do so without relieving the cause underlying the pain. The result is that the sufferer continues to put pressure on their joints unknowingly, continuing to do further harm. While certain supplements may relieve pain in the short term, it takes an average of 4 to 8 weeks to rebuild bodily tissue using good nutrition. This is why a steady diet plan is crucial when it comes to improving joint and tissue health.

Fatty fish

Fatty Fish
When it comes to keeping joints functioning, it’s all about the Omega-3s. Omega- 3 fatty acids, such as are found in halibut, tuna, salmon, herring, and sardines, can help lower inflammation levels and ease painful arthritis symptoms. These bone healthy nutrients work to lower overactive immune responses that can cause the degeneration of tissue, easing joint movement. Consuming significant amounts of omega-3s can also reduce the need for anti-inflammatory medication.

Dairy
Although dairy products may not be for everyone, they do contain large supplies of calcium, which is necessary for bone health. According to the American Association for Bone Health, calcium not only prevents bone loss, but also preserves the bone mass you currently have, bolstering joint health and flexibility. You can add calcium to your diet with the addition of soft cheeses, like ricotta, cream and cottage cheese, hard cheeses, like cheddar, Colby, and Parmesan, and low or nonfat milk, yogurt, and ice cream.

Whole Grains
Whole grains are rich in fiber, which helps lower levels of the harmful c-reactive protein that causes high levels of inflammation in the body, specifically the joints. Whole wheat, barley, quinoa, triticale, and oats are all whole grain rich food options.

Whole grains

Orange Fruit
As is the case with most fruit, the darker or brighter the hue, the higher the level of antioxidant. Bright orange fruits are known to be rich in beta-carotene, a form of vitamin A which helps reduce inflammation, says the American Association for Bone Health. Add to that a high vitamin C content and you have a food perfect for fighting bone loss while supplying dietary fibers. Your best fruity weapons against joint pain include mangoes, oranges, cantaloupe, and papaya.

Leafy Green Veggies
The dark green color not only makes them look more appealing, it also gives them their high concentrations of vitamins A and C which help fight bodily inflammation. Leafy green vegetables also contain fiber, which is not only naturally filling, but also fights joint inflammation. The American Association of Bone Health credits the vitamin K in green veggies for decreasing risk of fracture and bone loss and recommends the inclusion of Brussels sprouts, endive, spinach, kale, and collards for a joint healthy diet.

What do you eat to keep your joints and tissues strong and flexible? Let us know!

Why Arugula is Great

Salad greens are always healthy for you, right? Yes and no. Of course iceberg lettuce is far more healthful than a handful of french fries, but it does not contain a ton of vitamins, nutrients or minerals. Leafy greens, on the other hand, tend to be packed with necessary vitamins, nutrients and minerals to keep your body healthy and happy. Arugula is one leafy green that may be overlooked by many, but it is one that you should definitely be consuming.

Arugula salad

About Arugula
The botanical name for arugula is Eruca sativa and it has roots in the cruciferous family of vegetables. Other popular vegetables from this family include cauliflower and kale. Arugula is also referred to as “salad rocket,” which is a fitting name due to the zesty flavor this leafy green gives to your salads. Arugula has roots in the Mediterranean region, making it a popular choice in Italian cuisine. The peppery flavor of arugula greens spice up any dish you add it to from a fresh garden salad to your favorite pasta meal.

Health Benefits
Arugula is a member of the brassica family of vegetables (which also includes broccoli and cabbage) which are known to be full of fiber and high in antioxidants. Some of the specific health benefits of arugula are:

Fights Cancer – In addition to being rich in fiber and antioxidants, arugula also contains high levels of glucosinolates. Studies on vegetables from the brassica family suggest that these veggies may reduce the risk of developing breast, pancreatic, lung and prostate cancer.

Bone Health – Vitamin K is essential for strong, healthy bones. Your body needs vitamin K in order for proper absorption of calcium into your bones and teeth. Arugula is one of the best vegetable sources of vitamin K. A ½ cup serving of arugula contains 10.9 micrograms of vitamin K. If you consumed three cups of arugula, you would receive 100% of your necessary vitamin K for the day.

Weight Loss – Salads can get totally boring when you are attempting to lose weight, but not if you incorporate arugula into your salads. Arugula has a natural peppery flavor, adding a bit of zip to your salad. Additionally, one cup of arugula contains about 40 calories, so if you were to consume three cups of arugula (which provides you with all the vitamin K you need for the day), you would only be consuming 120 calories.

Rye bread with tuna and argula.

Hydration – Arugula is composed of 90% water. This makes it an excellent way to hydrate your body. Additionally, the peppery taste of arugula provides a natural cooling effect on your body, making arugula an excellent food to add to summer dishes for an extra bit of hydration.

Aphrodisiac – Bet you weren’t expecting this one, but arugula has been used as an aphrodisiac since the first century. Romans discovered that those who ate arugula were more sexually energized and arugula developed a reputation as a powerful aphrodisiac. There is actually science to back this up; the antioxidants and trace minerals found in this dark, leafy green are essential to your sexual health.

No matter what health benefit of arugula you find most appealing, you should definitely be adding this vegetable to your diet. Arugula is absolutely great for adding extra flavor to your salad, but you aren’t limited to salad if you want to introduce this veggie into your diet. Arugula is also a great addition to a pizza as it adds a lot of extra flavor but very few extra calories. Additionally, arugula tastes amazing added to your favorite tomato sauce of pesto recipe. Head to your local market and pick some of this leafy green up today to start seeing improvements in your health.