Tag Archives: Beautiful Skin

Hibiscus Extract For Your Skin

vine vera banner presents Hibiscus Extract For Your Skin

Botox. When its good its very good. It seems hard to contest the fact that, when done properly, botulism injections can solve a lot of aging problems. We’ve all seen those middle-aged women whose Botox injections have spared them from a lot of the common age-related complaints, and it seems like they’ve uncovered the Fountain of Youth. Then, we think of the expense, the horror stories, the looks of permanent surprise, and think it may be better to stay slightly more mature looking. But, what if you found out there was such a thing as the “Botox Flower.” Could it be possible that there was a natural substitute for something so, well, unnatural? Let’s take a look at Hibiscus extract and what it can do for the skin.

The Botox Plant
Not only is the hibiscus beautiful, it is also useful.The hibiscus earns its nickname from its reputation for increasing skin elasticity. The extracts from the stunning plant inhibit the activity of the enzyme elastase, responsible for breaking down skin’s elastin, which mimics the effects of Botox in its ability to firm and lift skin.

Evens Skin Tone
Hyperpigmentation refers to the appearance of discoloration or age spots that form on the skin as it ages, usually due to a number of variables, including genetics, exposure to ultraviolet rays, and excess production of melanin. The hibiscus contains organic acids, including malic and citric acid, which is responsible for the plant’s exfoliating properties, helping to boost turnover of cells for a more even skin tone.

vine vera banner presents Hibiscus Extract For Your Skin

Antioxidant Loaded
The word antioxidant has become common jargon in the beauty and health world lately. Antioxidants are the powerful naturally occurring ingredients with the astonishing power to fight free radicals and spare skin from the damaging effects of pollution and ultraviolet radiation. The Hibiscus is rich in anthocyanosis, which function as antioxidants as well as astringents. Not only do anthocyanosis prevent oxidation, they minimize the appearance of large pores, and have an anti-inflammatory effect, offering soothing relief for irritation, making hibiscus ideal for those with sensitive skin.

Purifies the Complexion
In addition to reducing the appearance of age spots, the exfoliating malic and citric acids in the skin can make for a fresher, smoother, younger looking complexion. By sloughing off dead skin cells, and promoting the growth of new ones, the acids can decrease the look of aging while decongesting pores to keep acne blemishes to a minimum. Also, because the acids in hibiscus extract are organic, they won’t strip skin of its natural oils like synthetic forms of the acids are likely to do, resulting in a supple, glowing complexion.

Moisture Boost
Of course, no “botox plant” worth its salt would be complete without some moisturizing properties. Hibiscus is high in mucilage content, which is a sticky plant produces the substance that aids in the storage of food and water, and also makes a fantastic natural skin moisturizer. The mucilage in the hibiscus helps skin to retain moisture, staying hydrated longer and keeping skin from excessive dryness and flaking.

What do you think? Have you tried hibiscus extract? Is hibiscus the “Botox Plant?” Let us know!

Coconut Oil Can Be Your Skin Saviour

benefits of using coconut oil

What is your oil d’jour? it seems that these days everyone’s skin routine needs to include some thick rich, usually edible natural oil in addition to the usual cast of serums, toners, and moisturizers. Some of you may have already made your choice, but, for those who are still open to suggestion, have you considered coconut oil? After all, it is summer; tiki torches, hula skirts, coconuts? Coconut oil is a great, natural choice for summer skincare, and it may be the closest to a tropical island you get this summer. Here are some other reasons you may want to try coconut oil.

Saturated Fats
Coconut oil keeps skin soft because of its medium chain fats, otherwise known as triglycerides. These fats retain the moisture content of the skin by eliminating the loss of moisture through the skin’s pores. When consumed regularly, the coconut oil deposits the fat under the skin. The result is healthy, Laurie smooth skin with an even tone.

Caprylic/ Capric/ Lauric acid
These work similarly to the triglycerides, but they also have disinfectant properties which protect skin from infections that can penetrate open wounds and pores. These benefits can be attained by taking the oil internally, or by applying it topically.

In addition to their antimicrobial properties, caprylic, capric lauric acids can provide a big energy boost before a workout. Because they are easily broken down; they are converted to usable energy quickly and efficiently, which is why they are often associated with weight loss. Losing weight also improves skin quality by reducing fat, stretch marks, and folds in the skin and ensuring that the body maintains a close grip around bones and muscles.

benefits of using coconut oil

Vitamin E
Vitamin E has been synonymous with skin care for years. it is needed for skin repair and growth and protects against aging and cracking. 100 grams of coconut oil contains about 0.1 mg of vitamin E, adding to its list of skin nourishing properties.

Proteins
The protein in coconut oil contributes to tissue repair and cellular health, guaranteeing the replacement of damaged cells on or near the skin. Research shows that individuals with low protein diets heal more slowly and develop more noticeable scars due to the longer healing time.

Uses
Lip Gel: Coconut oil provides a natural (edible) alternative to chemical lip gels. It works wonders and you don’t have to worry about it ending up in your belly.

Skin Softener: Coconut oil can be a great solution to hard and dry skin conditions on the face, hands, and feet and also has exfoliating properties. Combining coconut oil with exfoliating materials, such as salt and sugar, will improve the efficiency, sloughing off dead skin cells without irritation.

Skin Disorders: Coconut oil may also prove useful in battling skin disorders including eczema, acne, and psoriasis. Studies are ongoing as to whether or not the protein content in coconut oil is capable of replacing sick and dying cells related to these conditions.

Makeup Remover: Coconut oil takes off makeup quickly and thoroughly without harsh chemicals.

Is coconut oil your oil d’jour? If not what is? What do you use coconut oil for? Let us know!

Improve Your Skin’s Surface With Lightweight Oils

vine vera cosmetics Improve Your Skin's Surface With Lightweight Oils

We all know that skin dries out as we age, so it may seem like a no-brainer to assume the best way to fight aging is to apply the oiliest, thickest moisturizers to our moisture starved faces. And indeed, we have all heard the tales of someone’s grandmother who religiously applied petroleum jelly to her face nightly and never looked a day over 35. In fact, the lovely Marilyn Monroe was said to have generously applied layers of the stuff, but then again, Marilyn never did make it see how effective it was as a wrinkle fighter when things got serious.

However, regardless of Marilyn’s experience, or lack thereof, it seems like many women find thick moisturizers somewhat smothering, especially in the heat. For those who prefer lightweight oils, here are some that you might be worth checking out.

Moringa Oil
Moringa oil is derived from Moringa seeds and is rich in nutrients and antioxidants. Regular users will be rewarded with a glowing complexion without the greasy build-up of a heavier formula.

Tamanu Oil
Don’t let the thick consistency fool you. Tamanu oil penetrates the skin quickly and provides a full day of hydration when applied to damp skin. It also contains hydrating Omega fatty acid, known to promote the growth of healthy new cells, and its antioxidant properties can prevent wrinkles and sun damage.

Baobab Oil
Baobab oil traces its distinguished lineage to the baobab tree, responsible for producing fruit with the highest levels of antioxidants in the world. However, since the tree blooms but once a year, and only in the farthest reaches of Australia, Africa, and Madagascar, the oil tends to be on the pricey side. If you can get past the sticker shock, it may be well worth it. Baobab is similar to the oil our skin creates naturally and is rich in Vitamins A, D, E, and F and is known for keeping skin drying out without greasy build up.

vine vera cosmetics Improve Your Skin's Surface With Lightweight Oil

Jojoba Oil
You may know jojoba oil as being the closest oil to the oil our skin creates naturally, however, surprisingly, it is not an oil at all. According to aromatherapist and educator, Charlynn Avery, “Jojoba oil is not actually an oil, but a liquid wax, and it is considered universal in application. This means many different skin types can benefit.”

Argan Oil
Pure argan oil is often recommended for those with oily skin because of its high content of vitamin E and unsaturated fatty acids. Sources at Dermatology Review report that the oils help to control the production of sebum and contains antioxidants which remove damaged skin cells while increasing elasticity. It should be noted that those with nut allergies should proceed with caution when using argan oil, as it is derived from nuts of the Argania Spinosa tree.

Rose Hip Oil
While Rose hip oil is slightly heavier than the other oils on the list, it has a high amount of linoleic acid, which acne sufferers often have too little of, which makes it very effective for fighting breakouts. That along with its essential fatty acids and antioxidants is enough to qualify for any list of recommended skin care products.

What do you think? Are lightweight oils the way to go? Let us know which lightweight oils are among your favorites.

Hormonal Fluctuations Can Wreak Havoc On Your Skin

Vine vera cosmetics Hormonal Fluctuations Can Cause Havoc On Your Skin

Hormones, can’t live with ’em, can’t live without ’em. When you’re a teen, they hit you like a mac truck, wreaking havoc on your formerly clear skin and relatively easy going parents. Then, just when you thought you’d got them under control, the 40’s hit, hormone levels go down and you’re wishing for just a smidgeon of the estrogen you had in high school. Hormones can be a tricky thing, and sometimes they can seem to have a lot more control over your skin than you do, but there is a way to make peace. Read on for a little insight on hormone fluctuations, what to expect, and how to deal with them.

The Teen Years
When girls hit the ages of around 12 or 13, the introduction of hormones begins. The female body starts to produce estrogens and androgens in high quantities and the skin is impacted. Estrogen is responsible for the “female aesthetic”, causing breasts to develop and giving the hips their curves. In the skin, estrogen decreases the size of pores, giving it a smooth surface and builds elastin and collagen to give skin elasticity and maintain moisture. However, it is the male hormones which lead to the oiliness. Androgens, including testosterone, stimulate hair growth, enlarging pores and boosting sebum, the oily substance in the skin. The result? Acne.

The 20’s and 30’s
The twenties and thirties are definitely the best it gets as far as hormones are concerned. Estrogen peaks and the testosterone boosts sebum, giving skin radiant glow. The hormones are in balance.

The 30’s and 40’s
Of course, nothing gold can stay. After the estrogen effect peaks at around the age of 25, it begins to drop, slightly in the 30’s and more noticeably in the 40’s. Production of collagen and elastin decrease and the skin begins to lose elasticity, affecting the aging skin in a far greater capacity than sun damage. By the late 40’s women enter perimenopause, the purgatory between ovulation and menopause. Hormones cycles change and women may notice a resurgence of acne, an increase in facial hair, and thinning hair on the scalp.

50’s and Up
Most women have reached menopause by the age of 50. Estrogen and testosterone production declines, and with it, the skin manufactures less collagen and elastin. In fact, according to a study in the Venus Week, collagen production declines 2.1% every year in the 15 years following menopause, leading to a 30% decrease in collagen between the ages of 50 and 65. Hot flashes may occur and the skin will get drier, thinner, and more wrinkled.

Vine Vera cosmetics Hormonal Fluctuations Can Cause Havoc On Your Skin healthy woman

Controlling Hormones
Because hormone fluctuations are often the result of excess weight and lack of exercise, a good dietary and exercise regimen is key in maintaining hormonal balance. However, underweight women are also at risk for hormonal imbalances. Experts advise aiming for a body mass index between 20 and 25.

Women in their 20s can control acne by using face cleanser including salicylic acid, while older women with decreased skin elasticity should use an exfoliant weekly and an antioxidant containing moisturizer. Retinoids can help with wrinkles, and all women should wear sunscreen, as sun damage can intensify unwanted changes in the skin.

The first step to finding treatment is diagnosing the problem. Says Rebecca Booth, MD, “Women must first understand the effects of their hormones on the skin and overall health to seek lifestyle changes to navigate these natural fluctuations. With the power of knowledge, they can seek solutions to achieve the maximum flow of hormonal balance all month long and all life long.”

Are your hormones wreaking havoc on your skin? Let us know how you’re coping. We love to hear from you!

Replenish Your Skin’s Essential Nutrients

Vine Vera cosmetics Replenish Your Skin's Essential Nutrients

It seems like the expression “natural beauty” is being used with less and less certainty these days. Everything from human bodies to what we put in them seems to have been enhanced with some chemical or a surgery; nothing is beyond suspicion. It has gotten so that one cannot even declare an apple naturally lovely with complete confidence. However, despite the seeming invasion of the unnatural, there are still some earthly ingredients which may still rival the synthetic. Here are some natural ways of replenishing your skin’s nutrients through the foods you eat.

Vitamin C
Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant, and as such, it can help lower cancer risk and reduce oxidative stress. Vitamin C is also involved in the production of collagen, the protein responsible for maintaining the skin’s elasticity. Fruits and veggies are great C sources, so be sure to look for the vitamin in kale, Brussels sprouts, guava, grapefruit, strawberries, bell peppers, and beet greens.

Selenium
Another antioxidant, selenium is a trace mineral which helps to keep the skin firm and supple, prevents acne, and aids in the prevention of skin cancer. Selenium also assists with vitamin E absorption, enhancing the antioxidant properties of the vitamin, resulting in radiant skin and lower deterioration of collagen. Food sources of selenium include walnuts, brazil nuts, herring, onion, brown rice, seafood, and poultry.

Vine Vera Replenish Your Skin's Essential Nutrients

Vitamin E
Much hailed for as a key component in skin health, vitamin E is very effective, particularly in combination with vitamin A, for prevention of skin cancer. Vitamin E ‘s antioxidant properties help to fight free radicals which are catalysts to aging skin. You can get your vitamin E in eggs, avocados, walnuts, spinach, sunflower seeds, pine nuts, and olives.

Omega 3
Essential fatty acids, or EFAs, are known for their healing benefits in managing inflammatory skin conditions like eczema while controlling overexposure of cortisol levels which help to keep skin supple and reduce wrinkles. They are also responsible for moisture content and flexibility. Because the human body doesn’t produce Omega-3s on its own, they must be obtained through food sources such as salmon, walnuts, sardines, mackerel, and flax and chia seeds, or by taking a fish oil supplement.

Vine vera Replenish Your Skin's Essential Nutrients skin oils

Beta Carotene and Vitamin A
If you’ve got dry or flaky skin, you may be suffering from a deficiency in Vitamin A. Beta carotene is an antioxidant found in brightly colored food, and is the precursor to vitamin A, helping to reduce free radical damage from the sun. Beta-carotene and Vitamin A are found in collard greens, peaches, asparagus, beet green sweet potato, cantaloupe, and red peppers.

Zinc
Zinc is a trace mineral that can heal wounds and help repair tissue damage while protecting skin from ultraviolet rays. It has also been linked to acne prevention, and it is suspected that breakouts may occur as a result of a zinc deficiency. Foods rich in zinc include pecans, oysters, poultry, ginger, pumpkin seeds, legumes, mushrooms, and whole grains.

What are your natural beauty secrets? Let us know in comments and suggestions! We love to hear it!

 

Ingredients That Improve Your Skin’s Tone

Vine Vera cosmetics Ingredients That Improve Your Skin's Tone

Turmeric, arsenic, honey, lemon, tiger grass, burning face masks, glow tonics, tomatoes, and cucumbers. It seems apparent that a whole lot of time has been invested in the quest to even out skin tones, and little wonder. Dark spots, acne scars, sunspots can not only look Mar perfect complexions, but they also can also contribute to signs of aging and, if history is anything to go by, most of us will try almost anything to avoid that. Although the vast array of snake oils may seem overwhelming, there are a few key ingredients experts say are worth looking out for. Read on to find out which ones they say are most effective.

Uneven Skin Tone
The major causes of uneven skin tone are hyper-pigmentation, hormones, sunspots, and discoloration due to scarring from acne. Sun exposure can lead to an excess of melanin or pigment production in the skin which can create freckles and dark spots. Contraceptive pills and hormonal fluctuations during pregnancy can also cause discoloration, as can exposure to pollution and environmental factors.

Treatment
While there are numerous professional brightening treatments available many of them are quite risky. According to Kristine Colman, dermal therapist, “You risk hypopigmentation, which leaves you with a loss of pigment.” While it may be tempting to use Intense pulsed light (IPL) photo facials, chemical peels, and cryotherapy, which yield fast results, it may be best to consult a dermatologist before going these routes.

Vine Vera cosmetics Ingredients That Improve Your Skin's Tone for men

Ingredients To Look For

Soy
If you’re still bearing the evidence of your latest breakouts, you may want to try something which contains soy proteins, which help eliminate blotchiness and redness. A word to the wise: look for ones containing an SPF, as sun exposure can turn red marks into more permanent ones.

Enzymes
Melanozyme is a mushroom-derived enzyme that breaks down melanin responsible for producing dark pigments in your skin. However, beware of products with retinoids and hydroquinone which can create redness, burning, and dryness. Colman says, “Hexylresorcinol concentration at 0.5% has proven to be just as effective as 2 % concentration of hydroquinone.”

Botanicals
If you want to keep things in the flora and fauna family, a number of plants, such as angelic root and yomogi have been known to speed cell turnover and break down melanin to fade dark spots and acne marks. Colman recommends licorice for skin lightening and arnica flower extract, a known anti-inflammatory, for brightening.

Acid
Hydroxy, Glycolic, Kojic, and salicylic acid all act to remove dead skin cells, smooth out fine lines, and even out skin tone. The most effective products combine these with skin brightening ingredients.

Vive Vera  cosmetics Ingredients That Improve Your Skin's Tone beautiful woman

Vitamin C
Vitamin C is one of the most commonly used skin brightening ingredients. Its antioxidant properties lighten hyperpigmentation and prevent further spots from developing.

Make Up
If these ingredients don’t do the trick, You can always try light diffusing makeup. Keep in mind that the key to the even looking skin is the way the light reflects off it. Pigmented, rough skin does not reflect light in the same way that young healthy skin does. Translucent finishers and iridescent powders will boost skin tone while covering imperfections.

What do you think works best on evening your skin tone? Let us know! We love hearing your voice!

Five Steps To A Great Skincare Routine

There is nothing new about the “less is more” concept. Even before Susie Faux termed the phrase “capsule wardrobe” in the seventies, people have realized the wisdom of quality over quantity and the freedom derived from having less. So why is it that so many people are obsessed with multi-step beauty routines?

Of course, if you have the time and patience, you’re welcome to spend as much of it on skin care as you like, but, if you don’t, there is nothing wrong with keeping it scaled down. Remember, you own your beauty routine, it doesn’t own you. So, if you believe in keeping it short and sweet, here’s are five steps that will help you maximize while you minimize.

Woman cleansing skin

Cleanse
Cleansing skin is the most basic step in a skin routine. It should be done twice daily, once in the morning and once at night, to give skin time to heal and breath without being clogged by makeup and debris.

Cleansing should be done with clean hands. Begin by wetting skin with warm water to open the pores. Apply a cleanser appropriate to your skin type using upward circular motions. Some products will be more effective if you leave them on for a minute or two to allow penetration. Remove with damp cotton pads or by splashing your face with cold water. (Cold water will close up pores.) Pat dry gently with a clean towel.

Tone
Toning restores your skin’s pH balance, which is usually altered during the cleansing process. This step can also make your skin more resistant to bacteria. Some toners will only restore your skin’s pH, others will kill bacteria, still others may contain an extra ingredient to prevent acne. Choose the one that suits your skin, and, if you have sensitive skin, be sure to use a specially formulated toner.

Apply toner to entire face with a cotton pad, taking care to avoid your eyes. Do not rinse off.

Woman moisturizing

Moisturize
Moisturizing is the most important step in the beauty routine, and should not be omitted, even if your skin is oily. There is quite a variety of moisturizing products, such as gels (oily skin), creams (dry/sensitive skin), and serums (normal/oily skin). Some may contain anti wrinkle, and anti acne agents, others may tint, or tan, skin.

Apply moisturizer to the face and neck, after toner has dried, using a circular motion. You may want to follow up with a separate moisturizer targeted toward preventing swelling and aging in the eye area.

Exfoliate
Once or twice weekly, use an exfoliator to remove dead skin cells. Make sure not to use anything too harsh, which can irritate skin and tear skin cells.

Remove makeup and massage the exfoliator gently into your face using an outward circular motion for about thirty seconds. Remember, gently is the key word here! If you’re using an exfoliating wash cloth, soak it in warm water and rub it in small circles on your face. Be sure to target creases by your nose and other areas on which blackheads tend to develop.

Face mask

Face Mask
Peel off masks are the best option for unclogging pores, and are the best for oily or acne prone skin. Those with dry skin will benefit most from moisturizing masks.

Choose a natural, mild mask. Keep applications down to once a week or less; frequent applications will result in over cleansing your face. You can make your own, in the interest of keeping it natural, or use a store bought one, following directions on the package.

What do you think of the five-step skin routine? Is less more, or is more more? Let us know what you think?

Foods That Are Killing your Complexion

Woman drinking juice

You look in the mirror, and there it is: a new zit. You do a quick mental inventory of the foods you’ve eaten in the last few days to determine the culprit, but it doesn’t take you long to determine; it’s that candy bar you ate the other day. How you tried to forget about that dietary blunder. You didn’t even list it in your food journal. But now, here it is, getting its revenge in the form of a large pimple that will probably taunt you for the next two weeks.

You know that you are what you eat and your skin is one of the biggest reminders. Although some foods are hard to resist, pimples are a high price to pay. But, forewarned is forearmed. So, in the spirit of forewarning, here are some foods that may be causing those complexion killers.

Canned Soup
Although it may make a cheap, quick lunch, canned soup contains bisphenol and sodium which can make skin retain water, causing it to become dry, swollen, and inflamed. Bone broth is a gut soothing option which can help to heal the stomach lining without making your skin break out in the process.

donuts

Processed Carbohydrates
Processed carbohydrates include all those foods we love like white bread, cereals, and baked goods. Unfortunately, these dietary staples break down and transform into sugar, which is bad news for your health and your skin. Seed and almond flour crackers are low in sugar and high in fiber and may save you from acne woes.

Juice
Another high-sugar bandit, juice is no friend to the acne-prone. Try a high protein smoothie with healthy fats instead.

Canned Tuna
While it may be accessible and cost effective, canned tuna may not be your healthiest seafood option. Dr. Lipman says, “It lacks the nutrients found in wild fish and is often farmed, causing mercury toxicity. ” Canned wild salmon is a safer source of omega-3s and has anti-inflammatory properties.

Woman eating pizza

Cheese made from Cow’s Milk
Pizza eaters be warned. According to Dr. Frank Lipman, MD, “Dairy is a brilliant trigger for skin issues like acne, as all dairy products come from lactating organic cows. Organic cows are filled with cow’s hormones, which can trigger hormonal acne in humans.” If you can, try replacing the dreaded zit inducer with lactose free cashew cheese or nutritional yeast, although they may not work as well as mozzarella on pizza.

Soda
Soda is a veritable cocktail of skin no no’s, from its high sugar level to its chemical content. Soda increases insulin levels and can interfere with the production of healthy bacteria. The result? A plethora of skin issuers ranging from eczema and rosacea to acne. Kombucha is a probiotic rich alternative, which would be a less “inflammatory” option.

Coffee
Caffeine in coffee can dehydrate skin. If you can sacrifice the jolt, consuming hot water with a hint of lemon can hydrate skin and reduce inflammation.

Are there any foods worth suffering zits for? Let us know what you think! And good luck keeping your complexion clear and lovely!

Helping Beauty Products Penetrate Your Skin

woman looking at herself in mirror
Last night, you tried out a new skin product. It seemed to go well; it felt nice going on, didn’t leave weird residue and even smelled kind of nice. Is it a keeper? To decide that, you need to know the answer to the nagging query, “Did penetration occur?” Skin products are often advertised as having active ingredients that penetrate your skin, but how can you tell for sure? Here are some of the things you need to know about penetration that your mother never told you.

Skin Penetration
In the cosmetic world, penetration refers to the ability of cosmetic ingredients to sink into the lower skin cells layers. However, with skin supplies, as in other cases (ahem), there are certain times in which penetration is desirable and others when it is not. On the cosmetic end, if a beauty supplier wants to improve the feel of the formula on the skin or product’s water resistance, he or she will want the product to penetrate.

However, other suppliers may claim that their products penetrate skin to make the “active ingredient’ more effective. In such instances, they may declare their products contain ingredients that interact with the metabolism of the skin cells, working skin wonders such as collagen production or even wrinkle removal. The truth of the matter is that, in the United States, any product affecting skin metabolism is considered a drug. If products existed that could actually accomplish these great feats, they would thus be considered drugs and subject to more extensive testing than they were given before they were marketed in the US.

woman applying skin care product

Enhancing Penetration
Despite the fact that legitimate claims of product penetration are for usually non -cosmetic reasons, there are certain times in which you do want the product to penetrate. If this is the case, you may want to consider following your application with an emulsifier or solvent.

Emulsifiers form “micelles” in a solution which can surround “active ingredients.” When applied to the skin, emulsifiers penetrate into the skin and bring whatever is inside the micelle within it. The ability of emulsifiers to penetrate increases when the emulsion’s particle size decreases, so micro-emulsions and nano-emulsions work best. Phosphatideylacholine is a good example of an excellent penetration ingredient.

Solvents, such as propylene glycol can also enhance penetration by shuttling soluble ingredients from the top layers of the skin into the deeper layers.

Keeping Safe
In practicing safe penetration, certain products are a no no. Cleanser penetration can lead to irritation of skin because cleansers are designed to be removed. In addition, cosmetics which are only designed to make superficial differences should not be allowed to penetrate to living skin cells where it can interfere with skin metabolism.

If you are considering trying out a new skin product in the next few days, we hope you know the ins and outs of penetration. Let us know how your experience went. We would love to hear from you.

Omega 3 Rich Foods’ Skin Effects

Apparently Jennifer Anniston is not only beautiful, but smart, and she’s not only smart, she’s smart about being beautiful. Anyone interested in Jen’s eating habits will know that Jen is a firm believer an omega-3, fish oil rich diet. That’s because Jennifer Anniston knows how important omega-3 is for your skin. If you need more proof than Jenn’s face to convince you to put more Omega-3 in your diet, let’s talk about how it affects your skin and how you can get more of it.

fish oil omega 3 capsules woman taking omega-3 pill
What are Omega-3 Fatty Acids?
Also known as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), omega-3 fatty acids are essential fatty acids that the body cannot make by itself, and must be acquired through food. They are crucial for brain function, growth and development and also decrease the risk of heart disease. They are also good for the skin.

How Do They Work?
When we age, cells become thinner and less elastic. The barrier function of the skin is decreased and moisture is allowed to leave the skin causing it to become dry. In addition to this, the number of epidermal cells decreases as well, and the skin is not able to repair itself as efficiently. At the same time, structural elements which support the skin begin to weaken. All of these factors promote wrinkling.

Omega -3 fatty acids enforce the skin cell membrane. The skin cell membrane is the outermost layer of the skin cell and is responsible for monitoring the entrance and exit of nutrients and waste products, admitting them to the skin cell or disposing of them. The skin cell membrane also affects the ability of the cell to stay hydrated. If the skin cell can hold on to water, skin will be more moist and softer, which may prevent or even eradicate wrinkles.

Omega-3s and Sun Damage
Research demonstrates that omega-3 fatty acids can decrease skin damage from ultraviolet light and limit the production of cancer cells caused by UV light. Omega-3s also have anti-inflammatory properties which can heal wounds and treat psoriasis, acne, and atopic dermatitis.

Where Can We Get Them?
The most common food sources of Omega-3s are fish like mackerel and salmon, krill, algae and some plant and nut oils. Omega-3 derived from fish oils are not often featured in topical facial creams due to their undesirable fishy small and the presence of impurities, such as mercury, but facial creams are currently being developed with omega-3 from plants and algae.

If this isn’t enough inspiration for you to incorporate Omega-3 into your diet, just look at Jenni Anni’s face. Tell us how you get your Omega-3s. We love to hear it.