Tag Archives: Beautiful Skin

Five Steps To A Great Skincare Routine

There is nothing new about the “less is more” concept. Even before Susie Faux termed the phrase “capsule wardrobe” in the seventies, people have realized the wisdom of quality over quantity and the freedom derived from having less. So why is it that so many people are obsessed with multi-step beauty routines?

Of course, if you have the time and patience, you’re welcome to spend as much of it on skin care as you like, but, if you don’t, there is nothing wrong with keeping it scaled down. Remember, you own your beauty routine, it doesn’t own you. So, if you believe in keeping it short and sweet, here’s are five steps that will help you maximize while you minimize.

Woman cleansing skin

Cleanse
Cleansing skin is the most basic step in a skin routine. It should be done twice daily, once in the morning and once at night, to give skin time to heal and breath without being clogged by makeup and debris.

Cleansing should be done with clean hands. Begin by wetting skin with warm water to open the pores. Apply a cleanser appropriate to your skin type using upward circular motions. Some products will be more effective if you leave them on for a minute or two to allow penetration. Remove with damp cotton pads or by splashing your face with cold water. (Cold water will close up pores.) Pat dry gently with a clean towel.

Tone
Toning restores your skin’s pH balance, which is usually altered during the cleansing process. This step can also make your skin more resistant to bacteria. Some toners will only restore your skin’s pH, others will kill bacteria, still others may contain an extra ingredient to prevent acne. Choose the one that suits your skin, and, if you have sensitive skin, be sure to use a specially formulated toner.

Apply toner to entire face with a cotton pad, taking care to avoid your eyes. Do not rinse off.

Woman moisturizing

Moisturize
Moisturizing is the most important step in the beauty routine, and should not be omitted, even if your skin is oily. There is quite a variety of moisturizing products, such as gels (oily skin), creams (dry/sensitive skin), and serums (normal/oily skin). Some may contain anti wrinkle, and anti acne agents, others may tint, or tan, skin.

Apply moisturizer to the face and neck, after toner has dried, using a circular motion. You may want to follow up with a separate moisturizer targeted toward preventing swelling and aging in the eye area.

Exfoliate
Once or twice weekly, use an exfoliator to remove dead skin cells. Make sure not to use anything too harsh, which can irritate skin and tear skin cells.

Remove makeup and massage the exfoliator gently into your face using an outward circular motion for about thirty seconds. Remember, gently is the key word here! If you’re using an exfoliating wash cloth, soak it in warm water and rub it in small circles on your face. Be sure to target creases by your nose and other areas on which blackheads tend to develop.

Face mask

Face Mask
Peel off masks are the best option for unclogging pores, and are the best for oily or acne prone skin. Those with dry skin will benefit most from moisturizing masks.

Choose a natural, mild mask. Keep applications down to once a week or less; frequent applications will result in over cleansing your face. You can make your own, in the interest of keeping it natural, or use a store bought one, following directions on the package.

What do you think of the five-step skin routine? Is less more, or is more more? Let us know what you think?

Foods That Are Killing your Complexion

Woman drinking juice

You look in the mirror, and there it is: a new zit. You do a quick mental inventory of the foods you’ve eaten in the last few days to determine the culprit, but it doesn’t take you long to determine; it’s that candy bar you ate the other day. How you tried to forget about that dietary blunder. You didn’t even list it in your food journal. But now, here it is, getting its revenge in the form of a large pimple that will probably taunt you for the next two weeks.

You know that you are what you eat and your skin is one of the biggest reminders. Although some foods are hard to resist, pimples are a high price to pay. But, forewarned is forearmed. So, in the spirit of forewarning, here are some foods that may be causing those complexion killers.

Canned Soup
Although it may make a cheap, quick lunch, canned soup contains bisphenol and sodium which can make skin retain water, causing it to become dry, swollen, and inflamed. Bone broth is a gut soothing option which can help to heal the stomach lining without making your skin break out in the process.

donuts

Processed Carbohydrates
Processed carbohydrates include all those foods we love like white bread, cereals, and baked goods. Unfortunately, these dietary staples break down and transform into sugar, which is bad news for your health and your skin. Seed and almond flour crackers are low in sugar and high in fiber and may save you from acne woes.

Juice
Another high-sugar bandit, juice is no friend to the acne-prone. Try a high protein smoothie with healthy fats instead.

Canned Tuna
While it may be accessible and cost effective, canned tuna may not be your healthiest seafood option. Dr. Lipman says, “It lacks the nutrients found in wild fish and is often farmed, causing mercury toxicity. ” Canned wild salmon is a safer source of omega-3s and has anti-inflammatory properties.

Woman eating pizza

Cheese made from Cow’s Milk
Pizza eaters be warned. According to Dr. Frank Lipman, MD, “Dairy is a brilliant trigger for skin issues like acne, as all dairy products come from lactating organic cows. Organic cows are filled with cow’s hormones, which can trigger hormonal acne in humans.” If you can, try replacing the dreaded zit inducer with lactose free cashew cheese or nutritional yeast, although they may not work as well as mozzarella on pizza.

Soda
Soda is a veritable cocktail of skin no no’s, from its high sugar level to its chemical content. Soda increases insulin levels and can interfere with the production of healthy bacteria. The result? A plethora of skin issuers ranging from eczema and rosacea to acne. Kombucha is a probiotic rich alternative, which would be a less “inflammatory” option.

Coffee
Caffeine in coffee can dehydrate skin. If you can sacrifice the jolt, consuming hot water with a hint of lemon can hydrate skin and reduce inflammation.

Are there any foods worth suffering zits for? Let us know what you think! And good luck keeping your complexion clear and lovely!

Helping Beauty Products Penetrate Your Skin

woman looking at herself in mirror
Last night, you tried out a new skin product. It seemed to go well; it felt nice going on, didn’t leave weird residue and even smelled kind of nice. Is it a keeper? To decide that, you need to know the answer to the nagging query, “Did penetration occur?” Skin products are often advertised as having active ingredients that penetrate your skin, but how can you tell for sure? Here are some of the things you need to know about penetration that your mother never told you.

Skin Penetration
In the cosmetic world, penetration refers to the ability of cosmetic ingredients to sink into the lower skin cells layers. However, with skin supplies, as in other cases (ahem), there are certain times in which penetration is desirable and others when it is not. On the cosmetic end, if a beauty supplier wants to improve the feel of the formula on the skin or product’s water resistance, he or she will want the product to penetrate.

However, other suppliers may claim that their products penetrate skin to make the “active ingredient’ more effective. In such instances, they may declare their products contain ingredients that interact with the metabolism of the skin cells, working skin wonders such as collagen production or even wrinkle removal. The truth of the matter is that, in the United States, any product affecting skin metabolism is considered a drug. If products existed that could actually accomplish these great feats, they would thus be considered drugs and subject to more extensive testing than they were given before they were marketed in the US.

woman applying skin care product

Enhancing Penetration
Despite the fact that legitimate claims of product penetration are for usually non -cosmetic reasons, there are certain times in which you do want the product to penetrate. If this is the case, you may want to consider following your application with an emulsifier or solvent.

Emulsifiers form “micelles” in a solution which can surround “active ingredients.” When applied to the skin, emulsifiers penetrate into the skin and bring whatever is inside the micelle within it. The ability of emulsifiers to penetrate increases when the emulsion’s particle size decreases, so micro-emulsions and nano-emulsions work best. Phosphatideylacholine is a good example of an excellent penetration ingredient.

Solvents, such as propylene glycol can also enhance penetration by shuttling soluble ingredients from the top layers of the skin into the deeper layers.

Keeping Safe
In practicing safe penetration, certain products are a no no. Cleanser penetration can lead to irritation of skin because cleansers are designed to be removed. In addition, cosmetics which are only designed to make superficial differences should not be allowed to penetrate to living skin cells where it can interfere with skin metabolism.

If you are considering trying out a new skin product in the next few days, we hope you know the ins and outs of penetration. Let us know how your experience went. We would love to hear from you.

Omega 3 Rich Foods’ Skin Effects

Apparently Jennifer Anniston is not only beautiful, but smart, and she’s not only smart, she’s smart about being beautiful. Anyone interested in Jen’s eating habits will know that Jen is a firm believer an omega-3, fish oil rich diet. That’s because Jennifer Anniston knows how important omega-3 is for your skin. If you need more proof than Jenn’s face to convince you to put more Omega-3 in your diet, let’s talk about how it affects your skin and how you can get more of it.

fish oil omega 3 capsules woman taking omega-3 pill
What are Omega-3 Fatty Acids?
Also known as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), omega-3 fatty acids are essential fatty acids that the body cannot make by itself, and must be acquired through food. They are crucial for brain function, growth and development and also decrease the risk of heart disease. They are also good for the skin.

How Do They Work?
When we age, cells become thinner and less elastic. The barrier function of the skin is decreased and moisture is allowed to leave the skin causing it to become dry. In addition to this, the number of epidermal cells decreases as well, and the skin is not able to repair itself as efficiently. At the same time, structural elements which support the skin begin to weaken. All of these factors promote wrinkling.

Omega -3 fatty acids enforce the skin cell membrane. The skin cell membrane is the outermost layer of the skin cell and is responsible for monitoring the entrance and exit of nutrients and waste products, admitting them to the skin cell or disposing of them. The skin cell membrane also affects the ability of the cell to stay hydrated. If the skin cell can hold on to water, skin will be more moist and softer, which may prevent or even eradicate wrinkles.

Omega-3s and Sun Damage
Research demonstrates that omega-3 fatty acids can decrease skin damage from ultraviolet light and limit the production of cancer cells caused by UV light. Omega-3s also have anti-inflammatory properties which can heal wounds and treat psoriasis, acne, and atopic dermatitis.

Where Can We Get Them?
The most common food sources of Omega-3s are fish like mackerel and salmon, krill, algae and some plant and nut oils. Omega-3 derived from fish oils are not often featured in topical facial creams due to their undesirable fishy small and the presence of impurities, such as mercury, but facial creams are currently being developed with omega-3 from plants and algae.

If this isn’t enough inspiration for you to incorporate Omega-3 into your diet, just look at Jenni Anni’s face. Tell us how you get your Omega-3s. We love to hear it.

Ingredients That Help Minimize the Appearance of Pores – Vine Vera Reviews

Woman highlighting her common skin issues such as enlarged pores.

You are diligent about your skin care routine. You cleanse, hydrate and exfoliate routinely and you never sleep with makeup on. You eat a well-balanced diet with nutrients and vitamins meant to make your skin look its best. And yet you struggle with the appearance of enlarged pores. The battle seems to be never-ending. First of all, know that you are not alone in this struggle. Enlarged pores are one of the most common complaints made to dermatologists. While you can’t wave a magic wand and get rid of your pores, Vine Vera introduces you to some ingredients that, when used regularly, help to minimize the appearance of your pores.

What causes enlarged pores?
Your hormones are responsible for the regulation of glands that produce oil, also known as sebum. This sebum moves through the lining of each pore and rests on your face. With normal oil production, the movement of sebum from pore to face is seamless and imperceptible. The problem arises when your glands produce excess oil. The oil itself is not responsible for enlarged pores, it is the complications that occur with too much oil. The sebum mixes with other substances, like dead skin cells, and forms a clog in the pore. This clog is what forces the pore to become larger.

What skin care ingredients help minimize the appearance of enlarged pores?

Beta Hydroxy Acid
Salicylic acid, a BHA  that is often found in anti-acne products, in a gel or liquid form is one of the first ingredients you should look for. Products with BHA not only remove dead skin cells from the surface of your face, they also get into the pore and cleanse it. When used in a gel or liquid form, BHAs are not irritating to skin. Because BHAs exfoliate the inside of your pores, the shape of the pore is improved and oil flows much more easily.

Alpha Hydroxy Acid
Alpha hydroxy acids, like glycolic and lactic acid, work in much same way that BHAs work. They also exfoliate and remove dead skin cells and help clear pores, but they also help supply a bit of moisture. For this reason, AHAs are most beneficial to individuals with dry, sensitive skin or those who suffer from sun damage.

Retinoids
Prescription retinoids have been proven to have a positive effect on pore functioning. You may want to consider a trip to your doctor or dermatologist to talk about prescription retinol gels and creams if you have extremely stubborn skin or blackheads that are accompanied by other breakouts. Though these can be initially harsh on your skin, with regular use you will find your skin adapts. You can continue to use BHAs with retinoids if you want some extra help with your pores.

In addition to using these skin care ingredients, also be sure to check your products for items that may clog pores. Purchase items labeled as non-comedogenic as these formulations are far less likely to clog your pores. Additionally, clay masks can be a great help with minimizing the appearance of the pores if used regularly. Clay soaks up extra oil and helps to clean out your pores. Remember that good skin care does show results, it just may take some time to figure out what ingredients work best for your face.