Tag Archives: Beautiful Skin

Helping Beauty Products Penetrate Your Skin

woman looking at herself in mirror
Last night, you tried out a new skin product. It seemed to go well; it felt nice going on, didn’t leave weird residue and even smelled kind of nice. Is it a keeper? To decide that, you need to know the answer to the nagging query, “Did penetration occur?” Skin products are often advertised as having active ingredients that penetrate your skin, but how can you tell for sure? Here are some of the things you need to know about penetration that your mother never told you.

Skin Penetration
In the cosmetic world, penetration refers to the ability of cosmetic ingredients to sink into the lower skin cells layers. However, with skin supplies, as in other cases (ahem), there are certain times in which penetration is desirable and others when it is not. On the cosmetic end, if a beauty supplier wants to improve the feel of the formula on the skin or product’s water resistance, he or she will want the product to penetrate.

However, other suppliers may claim that their products penetrate skin to make the “active ingredient’ more effective. In such instances, they may declare their products contain ingredients that interact with the metabolism of the skin cells, working skin wonders such as collagen production or even wrinkle removal. The truth of the matter is that, in the United States, any product affecting skin metabolism is considered a drug. If products existed that could actually accomplish these great feats, they would thus be considered drugs and subject to more extensive testing than they were given before they were marketed in the US.

woman applying skin care product

Enhancing Penetration
Despite the fact that legitimate claims of product penetration are for usually non -cosmetic reasons, there are certain times in which you do want the product to penetrate. If this is the case, you may want to consider following your application with an emulsifier or solvent.

Emulsifiers form “micelles” in a solution which can surround “active ingredients.” When applied to the skin, emulsifiers penetrate into the skin and bring whatever is inside the micelle within it. The ability of emulsifiers to penetrate increases when the emulsion’s particle size decreases, so micro-emulsions and nano-emulsions work best. Phosphatideylacholine is a good example of an excellent penetration ingredient.

Solvents, such as propylene glycol can also enhance penetration by shuttling soluble ingredients from the top layers of the skin into the deeper layers.

Keeping Safe
In practicing safe penetration, certain products are a no no. Cleanser penetration can lead to irritation of skin because cleansers are designed to be removed. In addition, cosmetics which are only designed to make superficial differences should not be allowed to penetrate to living skin cells where it can interfere with skin metabolism.

If you are considering trying out a new skin product in the next few days, we hope you know the ins and outs of penetration. Let us know how your experience went. We would love to hear from you.

Omega 3 Rich Foods’ Skin Effects

Apparently Jennifer Anniston is not only beautiful, but smart, and she’s not only smart, she’s smart about being beautiful. Anyone interested in Jen’s eating habits will know that Jen is a firm believer an omega-3, fish oil rich diet. That’s because Jennifer Anniston knows how important omega-3 is for your skin. If you need more proof than Jenn’s face to convince you to put more Omega-3 in your diet, let’s talk about how it affects your skin and how you can get more of it.

fish oil omega 3 capsules woman taking omega-3 pill
What are Omega-3 Fatty Acids?
Also known as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), omega-3 fatty acids are essential fatty acids that the body cannot make by itself, and must be acquired through food. They are crucial for brain function, growth and development and also decrease the risk of heart disease. They are also good for the skin.

How Do They Work?
When we age, cells become thinner and less elastic. The barrier function of the skin is decreased and moisture is allowed to leave the skin causing it to become dry. In addition to this, the number of epidermal cells decreases as well, and the skin is not able to repair itself as efficiently. At the same time, structural elements which support the skin begin to weaken. All of these factors promote wrinkling.

Omega -3 fatty acids enforce the skin cell membrane. The skin cell membrane is the outermost layer of the skin cell and is responsible for monitoring the entrance and exit of nutrients and waste products, admitting them to the skin cell or disposing of them. The skin cell membrane also affects the ability of the cell to stay hydrated. If the skin cell can hold on to water, skin will be more moist and softer, which may prevent or even eradicate wrinkles.

Omega-3s and Sun Damage
Research demonstrates that omega-3 fatty acids can decrease skin damage from ultraviolet light and limit the production of cancer cells caused by UV light. Omega-3s also have anti-inflammatory properties which can heal wounds and treat psoriasis, acne, and atopic dermatitis.

Where Can We Get Them?
The most common food sources of Omega-3s are fish like mackerel and salmon, krill, algae and some plant and nut oils. Omega-3 derived from fish oils are not often featured in topical facial creams due to their undesirable fishy small and the presence of impurities, such as mercury, but facial creams are currently being developed with omega-3 from plants and algae.

If this isn’t enough inspiration for you to incorporate Omega-3 into your diet, just look at Jenni Anni’s face. Tell us how you get your Omega-3s. We love to hear it.

Ingredients That Help Minimize the Appearance of Pores – Vine Vera Reviews

Woman highlighting her common skin issues such as enlarged pores.

You are diligent about your skin care routine. You cleanse, hydrate and exfoliate routinely and you never sleep with makeup on. You eat a well-balanced diet with nutrients and vitamins meant to make your skin look its best. And yet you struggle with the appearance of enlarged pores. The battle seems to be never-ending. First of all, know that you are not alone in this struggle. Enlarged pores are one of the most common complaints made to dermatologists. While you can’t wave a magic wand and get rid of your pores, Vine Vera introduces you to some ingredients that, when used regularly, help to minimize the appearance of your pores.

What causes enlarged pores?
Your hormones are responsible for the regulation of glands that produce oil, also known as sebum. This sebum moves through the lining of each pore and rests on your face. With normal oil production, the movement of sebum from pore to face is seamless and imperceptible. The problem arises when your glands produce excess oil. The oil itself is not responsible for enlarged pores, it is the complications that occur with too much oil. The sebum mixes with other substances, like dead skin cells, and forms a clog in the pore. This clog is what forces the pore to become larger.

What skin care ingredients help minimize the appearance of enlarged pores?

Beta Hydroxy Acid
Salicylic acid, a BHA  that is often found in anti-acne products, in a gel or liquid form is one of the first ingredients you should look for. Products with BHA not only remove dead skin cells from the surface of your face, they also get into the pore and cleanse it. When used in a gel or liquid form, BHAs are not irritating to skin. Because BHAs exfoliate the inside of your pores, the shape of the pore is improved and oil flows much more easily.

Alpha Hydroxy Acid
Alpha hydroxy acids, like glycolic and lactic acid, work in much same way that BHAs work. They also exfoliate and remove dead skin cells and help clear pores, but they also help supply a bit of moisture. For this reason, AHAs are most beneficial to individuals with dry, sensitive skin or those who suffer from sun damage.

Retinoids
Prescription retinoids have been proven to have a positive effect on pore functioning. You may want to consider a trip to your doctor or dermatologist to talk about prescription retinol gels and creams if you have extremely stubborn skin or blackheads that are accompanied by other breakouts. Though these can be initially harsh on your skin, with regular use you will find your skin adapts. You can continue to use BHAs with retinoids if you want some extra help with your pores.

In addition to using these skin care ingredients, also be sure to check your products for items that may clog pores. Purchase items labeled as non-comedogenic as these formulations are far less likely to clog your pores. Additionally, clay masks can be a great help with minimizing the appearance of the pores if used regularly. Clay soaks up extra oil and helps to clean out your pores. Remember that good skin care does show results, it just may take some time to figure out what ingredients work best for your face.