Tag Archives: anti-aging

Add Avocado To Your Beauty Routine

Flower made of Avocado How often has this happened to you? You’re on a date or in a meeting and you go to the restroom. Check your look in the mirror, and there is, the inevitable food on the face. How long has it been there? Is it that noticeable? What is it? Where is it? On your nose? In your eyebrow? Most of us don’t want to be caught wearing our meals in public, yet, at home, it can be somewhat more acceptable, in fact, even desirable. Avocados can be great in your meals and also on your face, and hair. Here are some ways of incorporating the green wonder into your beauty routine.

Anti-Aging
One thing avocados, a.k.a. alligator pears are great for is anti-aging. Not only can you use the mashed avocado for a mask, but eating it helps to fight aging as well. The antioxidants in the avocado detoxify the body, reducing wrinkles and making skin soft and supple.

Drink the Juice for Skin Health
These days it seems as if no fruit or vegetable is beyond liquefaction, and avocados are no exception. Just mix one with a cup of milk in the blender and – voila- a drink full of nutrients and vitamins. Your skin will thank you for it. Add honey if you like it sweet.

Revitalizes the Scalp
Avocado is also a great treatment for your crowning glory. The fruit can be used to treat dry hair or a dry itchy scalp. Just mash some up and massage it into your scalp and let the proteins and amino acids work their magic. You should find a more comfortable, less flaky scalp, and improved overall hair condition.

fresh Avocado smoothie

Defrizz Hair
Got frizz? Put half a mashed up avocado in the blender, add two tablespoons of avocado oil, and work it into your hair and scalp. Let it sit for about 15 minutes and shampoo. You should find hair immediately less frizzy and easier to control.

Natural Sunscreen
If you’re looking for a chemical free way of guarding againstUVA and UVB exposure, avocado oil works as a natural sunscreen and also soothes sunburnt skin. The high antioxidant content of the avocado protects against free radical damage and can restore the effects caused by overexposure to the sun.

Treats Skin Conditions
The healthy fats and oils in contained in the avocado are a close match for the natural oils in the skin and make great natural moisturizers with calming properties to reduce inflammation. Just mash one up and put it right on your face and neck, and wash it off after 5 or 10 minutes and reap the effects of radiant, beautiful skin.

Bad Breath
Some stuff a stick of gum in their mouths before an up close encounter, others drink avocado juice. Bad breath comes from your stomach, not your mouth. Avocado juice cleanses both mouth and intestines, removing the microbes that cause bad breath.

What is your beauty go to’s? What food do you wear? What do you do with your avocados? Let us know! We love to hear it!

Counteract Weight Gain and Aging

women ageing happily

Think a moment about the recent sitcoms. “Seinfeld”, “King of Queens”, “Everybody Loves Raymond”: what do they have in common? Hot lady, not so hot guy. Gone are the days of “The Brady Bunch” and “I Dream of Jeannie” when every couple had a Barbie and a Ken. Nowadays it’s a little closer to “Beauty and the Beast.” Why this sudden disparity between partners? Is it a television’s way of showing us nice guys don’t always finish last, or is it simply a more realistic interpretation of life? Let’s have a look at what the experts say about this strange phenomenon.

Is She Really Going Out With Him?
According to LA-based dermatologist Dr. Jason Emer, “I have a significant portion of middle- aged men whose wives are taking care of themselves, but they’ve gained weight because they don’t have time to exercise and diet, and they have a lot of sun damage. They come in and they say they want to look as good as their wives.”

Why Do Men Let Themselves Go?
Dr. John Layke thinks that the extra edge men have over women when it comes to aging make them more lax about grooming. Male skin is about 25% thicker than female skin because it contains testosterone. However, after a certain age, it begins to taper off because of lifestyle and hormonal factors.

Says Lake, “Men age at a slower rate, but all of a sudden it hits at 50. After age 30, men lose 1 percent of testosterone per year you start to see it around age 50 (when the loss is) 20%.”
In addition, man loses muscle as they age which can slow metabolism and cause weight gain. The loss of testosterone also causes the skin to thin out and wrinkle more. Add to that the fact that half of the men have male pattern baldness by the age of 50, and the picture becomes clearer. “It’s all gradual,” says Lake, “but …by the time (men) figure this stuff out it’s too late.”

girl checking weight

Sun Damage
New York plastic surgeon Sachin Shridharani believes sun damage is partially responsible for the divide. She describes situations where couples “go on the same vacation, but he’s like, she was going stuff on her skin-why was no one telling me to put sunscreen on? Where was the sunblock for men?”

Shri Dhani acknowledges that men don’t always have the benefit of media messaging about staying in shape the women do. She says, “You see couples that age together, and you notice that the guy didn’t have the benefit of knowing what to do.”

Dad Bod
Then there’s the “Dad Bod.” According to registered dietician Tanya Zuckerbrot, 40% of her clients are men between the ages of 40 and 70, and nearly all of them are dealing with weight gain. “We assume that getting heavier is part of the natural aging process. And while it typically is, it doesn’t have to be.”

What Can We do
Most experts agree that, while a neat diet and exercise routine can help to counteract the aging process, the biggest obstacle is teaching men how to adapt to lifestyle changes. Can you teach an old dog new tricks? Time will tell. But in the meantime, the ladies may just have to settle.

What do you think? Can men over 50 learn to keep themselves healthy and looking good? Tell us about your worse half. We want to know!

Two Products That Can Help You Fight Aging

Beautiful woman in the garden

With all the products out there, it may seem to you that your bathroom has become something closer to a chemistry lab than a bathroom. You are no longer simply the makeup artist, but the subject of a mad science experiment designed to determine what works best on your skin, regardless of negative side effects. Redness, breakouts, rashes, all in the name of the science of beauty. While many of us chalk up failed experimentation to trial and error, there are some things that no women’s cache of makeup should be without. Two of these products are serums and sunscreen.

What Are Serums?
All moisturizers, whether anti-aging or otherwise, should contain a blend of antioxidants, and ingredients for skin replenishment and restoration. Good serums are marked by a high concentration of these ingredients and also by the distinctive texture of the ingredients they contain. Serums should apply smoothly and have a lightweight feel despite their powerful contents.

Tips on Serums
Serums usually address a variety of issues, including wrinkles, environmental damage, loss of firmness, and uneven skin tone.

If you’re looking to safeguard your skin from visible effects of pollution, look for something with a high antioxidant concentration. Antioxidant superstars include retinol, vitamin C, and vitamin E. If you are sensitive to retinol, a vitamin C and peptide containing formula will work well.

Extra sensitive skin prone to redness will benefit from a redness relief formula with ingredients like ceramics and glycerin.

woman trying out products

For large pores, bumpy skin and signs of aging, look for something with niacinamide and hyaluronic acid which will smooth the surface of the skin without a greasy feel.

Serums should be applied twice a day and can be used with or without moisturizers, depending on your skincare needs.

Sunscreen
The first step in any serious anti-aging routine is an SPF rated 30 or higher, and lots of it. That means daily application whether or not the sun is out. And, remember, UVA rays can penetrate glass, so that means that even home, car and office do not provide cover from the damaging rays of the sun, so apply whether inside or out with due diligence.

Tips On Sunscreens
To maximize the benefits of sunscreen, you may want to consider the following:

  • You probably don’t want to apply a typical “beach” all- over body moisturizer to your face. A facial moisturizer with built-in sunscreen will give you the protection while also providing the hydration and anti-aging ingredients that your face requires.
  • Look for a facial moisturizer/sunscreen based on your skin type. Creams work best on dry skin, while fluids and gels are best for oily skin. Those with combination skin should look for a lotion of gel.
  • Antioxidants work well with sunscreen. Look for sunscreens with vitamins C and E, soy, grape, pomegranate am green tea.
  • Sunscreen should be the last skincare product you apply in your am routine. Applying products over sunscreen will make it less effective. If you are layering sunscreen, start with a facial moisturizer with SPF protection, followed by a primer containing sunscreen and topped off with a pressed powder with added protection from the sun.

What do you look for in your sunscreen and serums? Let us know what works best for you to combat aging issues.

Hormonal Fluctuations Can Wreak Havoc On Your Skin

Vine vera cosmetics Hormonal Fluctuations Can Cause Havoc On Your Skin

Hormones, can’t live with ’em, can’t live without ’em. When you’re a teen, they hit you like a mac truck, wreaking havoc on your formerly clear skin and relatively easy going parents. Then, just when you thought you’d got them under control, the 40’s hit, hormone levels go down and you’re wishing for just a smidgeon of the estrogen you had in high school. Hormones can be a tricky thing, and sometimes they can seem to have a lot more control over your skin than you do, but there is a way to make peace. Read on for a little insight on hormone fluctuations, what to expect, and how to deal with them.

The Teen Years
When girls hit the ages of around 12 or 13, the introduction of hormones begins. The female body starts to produce estrogens and androgens in high quantities and the skin is impacted. Estrogen is responsible for the “female aesthetic”, causing breasts to develop and giving the hips their curves. In the skin, estrogen decreases the size of pores, giving it a smooth surface and builds elastin and collagen to give skin elasticity and maintain moisture. However, it is the male hormones which lead to the oiliness. Androgens, including testosterone, stimulate hair growth, enlarging pores and boosting sebum, the oily substance in the skin. The result? Acne.

The 20’s and 30’s
The twenties and thirties are definitely the best it gets as far as hormones are concerned. Estrogen peaks and the testosterone boosts sebum, giving skin radiant glow. The hormones are in balance.

The 30’s and 40’s
Of course, nothing gold can stay. After the estrogen effect peaks at around the age of 25, it begins to drop, slightly in the 30’s and more noticeably in the 40’s. Production of collagen and elastin decrease and the skin begins to lose elasticity, affecting the aging skin in a far greater capacity than sun damage. By the late 40’s women enter perimenopause, the purgatory between ovulation and menopause. Hormones cycles change and women may notice a resurgence of acne, an increase in facial hair, and thinning hair on the scalp.

50’s and Up
Most women have reached menopause by the age of 50. Estrogen and testosterone production declines, and with it, the skin manufactures less collagen and elastin. In fact, according to a study in the Venus Week, collagen production declines 2.1% every year in the 15 years following menopause, leading to a 30% decrease in collagen between the ages of 50 and 65. Hot flashes may occur and the skin will get drier, thinner, and more wrinkled.

Vine Vera cosmetics Hormonal Fluctuations Can Cause Havoc On Your Skin healthy woman

Controlling Hormones
Because hormone fluctuations are often the result of excess weight and lack of exercise, a good dietary and exercise regimen is key in maintaining hormonal balance. However, underweight women are also at risk for hormonal imbalances. Experts advise aiming for a body mass index between 20 and 25.

Women in their 20s can control acne by using face cleanser including salicylic acid, while older women with decreased skin elasticity should use an exfoliant weekly and an antioxidant containing moisturizer. Retinoids can help with wrinkles, and all women should wear sunscreen, as sun damage can intensify unwanted changes in the skin.

The first step to finding treatment is diagnosing the problem. Says Rebecca Booth, MD, “Women must first understand the effects of their hormones on the skin and overall health to seek lifestyle changes to navigate these natural fluctuations. With the power of knowledge, they can seek solutions to achieve the maximum flow of hormonal balance all month long and all life long.”

Are your hormones wreaking havoc on your skin? Let us know how you’re coping. We love to hear from you!

Replenish Your Skin’s Essential Nutrients

Vine Vera cosmetics Replenish Your Skin's Essential Nutrients

It seems like the expression “natural beauty” is being used with less and less certainty these days. Everything from human bodies to what we put in them seems to have been enhanced with some chemical or a surgery; nothing is beyond suspicion. It has gotten so that one cannot even declare an apple naturally lovely with complete confidence. However, despite the seeming invasion of the unnatural, there are still some earthly ingredients which may still rival the synthetic. Here are some natural ways of replenishing your skin’s nutrients through the foods you eat.

Vitamin C
Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant, and as such, it can help lower cancer risk and reduce oxidative stress. Vitamin C is also involved in the production of collagen, the protein responsible for maintaining the skin’s elasticity. Fruits and veggies are great C sources, so be sure to look for the vitamin in kale, Brussels sprouts, guava, grapefruit, strawberries, bell peppers, and beet greens.

Selenium
Another antioxidant, selenium is a trace mineral which helps to keep the skin firm and supple, prevents acne, and aids in the prevention of skin cancer. Selenium also assists with vitamin E absorption, enhancing the antioxidant properties of the vitamin, resulting in radiant skin and lower deterioration of collagen. Food sources of selenium include walnuts, brazil nuts, herring, onion, brown rice, seafood, and poultry.

Vine Vera Replenish Your Skin's Essential Nutrients

Vitamin E
Much hailed for as a key component in skin health, vitamin E is very effective, particularly in combination with vitamin A, for prevention of skin cancer. Vitamin E ‘s antioxidant properties help to fight free radicals which are catalysts to aging skin. You can get your vitamin E in eggs, avocados, walnuts, spinach, sunflower seeds, pine nuts, and olives.

Omega 3
Essential fatty acids, or EFAs, are known for their healing benefits in managing inflammatory skin conditions like eczema while controlling overexposure of cortisol levels which help to keep skin supple and reduce wrinkles. They are also responsible for moisture content and flexibility. Because the human body doesn’t produce Omega-3s on its own, they must be obtained through food sources such as salmon, walnuts, sardines, mackerel, and flax and chia seeds, or by taking a fish oil supplement.

Vine vera Replenish Your Skin's Essential Nutrients skin oils

Beta Carotene and Vitamin A
If you’ve got dry or flaky skin, you may be suffering from a deficiency in Vitamin A. Beta carotene is an antioxidant found in brightly colored food, and is the precursor to vitamin A, helping to reduce free radical damage from the sun. Beta-carotene and Vitamin A are found in collard greens, peaches, asparagus, beet green sweet potato, cantaloupe, and red peppers.

Zinc
Zinc is a trace mineral that can heal wounds and help repair tissue damage while protecting skin from ultraviolet rays. It has also been linked to acne prevention, and it is suspected that breakouts may occur as a result of a zinc deficiency. Foods rich in zinc include pecans, oysters, poultry, ginger, pumpkin seeds, legumes, mushrooms, and whole grains.

What are your natural beauty secrets? Let us know in comments and suggestions! We love to hear it!

 

Everyday Ingredients To Keep Your Skin Fresh Between Facials

Is there any way to keep your skin looking “fresh from a facial” great every day? Here are some ingredients that will help you do just that.

beautiful woman

Antioxidants
Antioxidants are nutrients found in most plants and are best known for their ability to fight “free radicals.” Free radicals harm DNA, and lead to wrinkles, dry, dull skin, and dark circles around the eyes. To keep skin looking fresh, it is important to not only eat foods rich in these chemicals, but also to use them on your skin.

Alpha Lipoic Acid
This is an antioxidant produced by the body and present in every cell you have. It attacks free radicals and it known for its ability to erase wrinkles and fine lines, shrink pores, and give a healthy glow to the skin.

Green Tea Extract
Tea is rich in free radical-fighting nutrients called polyphenols. Early studies have proven the ingredients in tea able to reduce sun damage and protect from skin cancer when applied topically. Green tea extract can be used under sunscreen to double the protection and, polyphenols, when used in lotions and creams, can reduce skin sagginess and wrinkles.

Retinol
Retinol is a vitamin A derivative that boosts collagen production and plumps skin, reducing the appearance of wrinkles and fine lines. It improves skin tone and reduces dark patches. The stronger counterpoint of retinol is tretinoin, which can improve skin appearance by clearing up acne, slowing aging of skin, and improving unwanted pigmentation.

Portrait of a woman

Vitamin C
Vitamin C is a key ingredient in boosting production of collagen and elastin, which depletes with age. Its antioxidants minimize fine lines, scars, and wrinkles.

Coenzyme Q-10 (CoQ-10)
Naturally occurring in your body, CoQ 10 works to destroy free radical in your cells. However, as you age, the amount your body makes decreases, making skin more vulnerable to free radical damage. Creams, gels, and toners containing the antioxidant can be used to supplement the decrease, with one study showing that it can even help to reduce the appearance of “crow’s feet” around the eyes.

Caffeine
Although the jury is still out on whether caffeine is effective when applied to skin, skin care companies have added it to lotions and creams. This is based on the evidence that caffeine may be useful in preventing skin cancer and the deepening of wrinkles, especially “crow’s feet.”

How do you keep that “fresh from the salon glow” every day? You’re looking particularly radiant.

Use These Herbal Aids For Dry Skin

If there is anything to be learned from history, it is safe to say that people have always had a high respect for herbs. Elizabethan herbalist, Nicholas Culpepper credited plants with possessing powers of good (light) and evil (dark). That may explain why Chinese Emperor, and part time herbal enthusiast, Chi’en Nung, while able to identify 365 healing herbs, died after consuming one that turned out to be poisonous.

Despite the occasional mishap, it is safe to say that the herbal remedy has maintained a pretty respectable track record to this day, quite a feat considering how long its history is. Herbals have been credited with easing aches, pains, digestion problems and are also one of the most effective and trusted ingredients in beauty and skin products. If you are looking to give your skin a hydrating boost, here are some of the best (pretested) herbal remedies for dry skin relief.

avocado oil

Avocado Oil
It should be no surprise that a super food makes a super skin treatment. Avocado oil stimulates production of collagen and hydrates skin, and can even be used as a substitute for your nightly serum.

Rosemary Oil
Rosemary oil helps to stimulate cell renewal and gets rid of cells that dull the complexion to reveal new, fresh skin underneath. It can also be used to treat dry, itchy scalp and dandruff. Mix five to seven drops with luke warm water and use it to rinse hair after shampooing to address a flaky scalp.

Lavender Oil
Not only does it smell great, lavender can also relieve itchy tight skin and protect it from UV rays and free radicals which cause premature aging. Apply directly to your face, or put a few drops in your day or night cream.

Pomegranate seed oil

Pomegranate Seed Oil
The antioxidant properties in the pomegranate makes them a great anti-ager, whether you choose to munch or apply topically. The magical seeds can reduce breakdown and increase production of collagen to keep your skin looking firm and useful. Put a drop on your skin after applying moisturizer.

Grapeseed Oil
You’ve probably seen this ingredient being given credit on the labels of anti aging serums and creams. Grapeseed oil has been a proven component in the restoration of collagen and softens find lines to help skin stay firm. “Plus, according to David Colbert, MD, “grape seed oil is high in polyphenols which are antioxidants that can help calm inflammation.” Add two drops to your morning moisturizer to reap its anti aging benefits.

Sunflower Seed Oil
Got dry scaly elbows and knees? Slather some of this vitamin E rich oil on them for some quick hydration.

carrot seed oil

Carrot Seed Oil
Fight age spots with this bunny pleasing option, extracted from the dried seeds of the orange plant. Carrot seed oil can also speed up healing of skin irritations like psoriasis, dermatitis, and eczema.

Olive Oil
Besides being a delicious addition to food, olive oil can also be just the thing to relieve a dry, itchy scalp, due to its anti fungal and antibacterial properties. Ellen Marmur, MD, advises, “To calm either issue, once a week, massage a 1/4 cup of olive oils into your scalp so its evenly saturated. Wait at least 20 minutes, then shampoo and condition. Use the remainder to treat your complexion. Olive oil is rich in vitamins that can help prevent spots anilines caused by sun damage. Put two drops in your favorite moisturizer to boost results.

What herbal treatments work best on your dry skin? Let us know your favorites!

Prevent Wrinkles On Your Chest and Neck

In “Gravity,” a video installation Michael Haussman, the artist, asked his subjects were to jump on a trampoline while he shot a video. He edited in post-production, steadying the subjects in the frame so that they appeared to stay still while their fat and muscles remained in motion, The result suggests a time-lapse aging, in which the subject’s body seems to age about thirty years in 15 seconds. It shows us how the aging process alters perception, changing the flawless to the flawed sometimes in a matter of very little time.

Woman smiling

Gravity: it’s skin’s biggest downfall, and causes even the most taught bodies to sag and wrinkle. However, while we can’t fight the gravity, we can fight the effects. Here are some ways to prevent wrinkles on the neck and chest.

Types of Wrinkles
With the aging process, you may begin to notice loose crepey skin and wrinkles on your chest and neck areas. Although some of this can be attributed to loss of collagen, environmental factors are largely to blame. According to AgingSkin.Net, 90-95% of all lines, wrinkles and discolorations are due to sun exposure.

While chest and neck wrinkles usually appear with age, “necklace lines,” characterized by horizontal lines on your neck can start in your twenties, or even as early as childhood. Loose and saggy skin is more often associated with age.

Reasons
There are several hypotheses as to the cause of aging on the neck and chest. One theory, suggested by Skintour.com, is that chest wrinkles are a result of sleeping position. Impression lines caused by sheets and blankets that faded quickly when you were young, may become a little less temporary as you age, due to loss of elasticity.

Treatment
Laser treatments, chemical peels and botox injections are all options for treating skin on the chest and neck. A study conducted by the Brazilian Center for Studies in Dermatology found that injecting Poly-L-Lactic acid or PLLA into the neck and chest could also improve the appearance of wrinkles. Adjusting your sleep position from your side to your back may be another option, as are breast pads and pillows.

Product
It is important to realize that most skin products are not just for your face. When you cleanse your face, be sure to include your neck, as should be the case with toners, moisturizers, masks, and scrubs. Look especially for skin care products containing antioxidants to fight damaging free radicals.

Moisturize
Never underestimate the power of a good moisturizer. Note that your neck and chest have fewer oil glands than your face, and are more prone to dryness and irritation. Moisturizers help maintain elasticity and plumpness for ease of mobility and a smoother appearance.

Sun Exposure
Protecting exposed skin from the sun is important to everyone, regardless of skin condition, Use a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30, with 5 to 10 % titanium and zinc on law exposed skin, neck and chest included.

What do you do to prevent wrinkles on your neck and chest? Let us know!

Vitamin A Derivatives That Improve Skin Texture, Tone, and Color

As is the case with many of the best discoveries, the use of vitamin A as a wrinkle control agent happened largely by accident. It all began in the laboratories of Dr. Albert Kligman in the 1960’s when the controversial dermatologist began to experiment on prisoners with a vitamin A derivative called tretinoin as an acne treatment. Imagine the delight of the incarcerated men to discover not only the disappearance of their acne, but a noticeable decrease in wrinkles and smoother skin tones!

Woman applying vitamin A on her skin

Vitamin A and its derivatives have often been referred to as the “gold standard of skin care,” a paragon of excellence against which all other skin care products can be measured. If you are thinking of incorporating some vitamin A into your routine, here are some things you may want to know.

Retinoids
Retinoids are also known as the generic term for tretinoin, retin-A, or differin, and are available only by prescription. They are absorbed directly into the skin cells which makes them highly effective against hyperpigmentation, wrinkles, and acne.

The downside of this miracle cream is its likelihood to cause skin irritation. Retinoids are often associated with redness and peeling and require adjustment to the dosage to combat these side effects. The key with these products is keeping the applied amount to a minimum. A pea-sized amount should be enough for the whole face, and a larger quantity is unnecessary.

Retinol
Retinol is vitamin A in its pure form and is an over the counter alternative to harsher retinoids. While the conversion to retinoic acid will decrease the potency of the retinol, it should still be effective enough to bring noticeable results. Although retinol may trigger minor irritation, side effects should generally subside over time as the skin grows more accustomed to the treatment.

Retinyl Palmitate
This combination of retinol and palmitic acid is one of the less effective vitamin A derivatives. While it does convert to retinoic acid, the process often takes so long that by the time it is completed, the product has lost most of its ability to affect the DNA of the cell. As a result, you would need a very high concentration of retinal palmitate to have significant effect, and most cosmetic companies who use it as a source of vitamin A usually do not put enough of it in their serums and creams to make a difference.
The bottom line: If retinyl palmitate is not combined with other vitamin A derivatives, it is almost useless.

Retinaldehyde
Retinaldehyde is a potent over the counter form of vitamin A which is commonly perceived to be the closest to retinoic acid without the irritating side effects. However, it is important to take note of content in your product. In order to be effective, a retinaldehyde concentration of 0.05% to 0.1% needs to be present. This is the equivalent of a 0.025 tretinoin. The biggest side effect of retinaldehyde will be the lightening of your purse. Most skin care products containing substantial amounts of the ingredient will be on the high-end side in price, so be prepared to pay for quality.

Other Advice
Be aware that vitamin A is not stable and tends to lose potency when it interacts with sunlight. Creams and serums are therefore best applied at night. Do not use a cleanser with retinoids, as the retinoids depend on contact with skin to achieve full benefit and should not be washed away. When purchasing retinoids, look for packaging that minimizes exposure to air and light which can affect the stability of the vitamin.

Let us know your choice when it comes to choosing Vitamin A derivatives. Which ones work best for you?

Spinach for Healthy Skin

It’s not easy being green. So how is it that spinach carries it off with such aplomb? Sure, spinach has had its defenders over the years, Popeye topping the list, not to mention culinary greats who used the green leafy vegetable to create such dishes as spinach soufflé, spinach lasagna, and countless versions of spinach salad. But, considering its unappetizing appearance, you could say spinach has done very well for itself. Besides being hailed for its high antioxidant and nutrient content, spinach is also receiving props for its ability to help maintain healthy skin. Here’s how you can use spinach to keep your skin smooth and radiant.

Bowl of green spinach

Nutritional Value
Spinach contains the antioxidant beta-carotene, which aids skin repair and slows cancer cells.

  • Vitamin A: One cup of cooked spinach contains 943 mcg of this vitamin, which is 105% of the daily recommended allowance, RDA, for men and 135% of the RDA for adult females.
  • Vitamin C: This antioxidant is crucial for skin cell repair and growth. Because vitamin C is not stored in the body, it must be provided by your daily diet. A cup of cooled spinach will give adult men 17.6 mg or 20% of the RDA of vitamin C, while it will give women 23%.
  • Iron: Iron is a component of hemoglobin, which is a protein found in red blood cells responsible for supplying oxygen to the tissues. You can find 6.5 mg of iron in a cup of cooked spinach which is equivalent to 81% of the RDA for men, and 36% of the RDA for women.
  • Magnesium: One cup of cooked spinach will provide you with 157mg magnesium, approximately 49% of the RDA for adult females and 37% for adult males. Magnesium is known for its ability to heal wounds and infections on the skin.

For Acne
Spinach can be used as a face mask or in juice from to help acne-prone skin. To make the mask, blend spinach and mix with water. Apply it to your face and let sit for about twenty minutes before rinsing. While making the juice requires a bit more effort, it is often the preferred method of obtaining the full benefits of the vegetable. Mix a half tomato with one carrot, one celery, a quarter of a cucumber, held a cup of cabbage, one green onion, half a red pepper, and a handful of spinach. Blend a drink daily.

Spinach juice

Anti-Aging
Spinach is a goldmine of antioxidants. Antioxidants are crucial for destroying damaging free radicals which cause premature aging. The regular consumption of this leafy green will help to slow down skin degeneration and make skin radiant.

Additionally, spinach has a high water content. One cup of cooked spinach provides 5 ounces of water to keep skin cells hydrated and is crucial to cell function. Spinach also contains iron and vitamin C to boost collagen synthesis. Collagen is a protein required for muscle and skin elasticity.

Skin Repair
The vitamin A in spinach helps to keep skin toned and smooth, while the vitamin C helps to rejuvenate skin cells. These vitamins, along with iron, also support collagen levels essential for skin repair.

Improves Complexion
Folate and vitamin K are both found in spinach and can reduce the prevalence of dry skin, acne, and stretch marks, minimizing bruising and dark circles. The high vitamin content in the leafy green can also relieve itchy, dry skin, leaving you a radiant complexion.

Mixed spinach

Experts recommend eating cooked spinach as opposed to raw for better nutrition digestion. Cooking spinach also eliminates the effects of oxalic acid, which interferes with the body’s absorption of calcium. Liquid forms of spinach are especially effective when combined with other vegetables.

Spinach Face Mask
To get the benefits of spinach for your skin, try this natural recipe:

Mix five or six fresh spinach leaves with 1 tablespoon of raw honey ( manuka honey is recommended.) Add two tablespoons of lemon juice. Dilute with water is your skin is sensitive to lemon. The mixture will be sticky. Apply mask to clean face. Let it sit for 20 minutes. Rinse and pat dry. Repeat for smooth skin tone.

Do you eat your spinach right down to the finish? If so, let us know how your skin is doing! We love to hear from you!