Tag Archives: Allergic Reactions

Spring And Pollen Are In The Air

Spring has sprung, and so has your post nasal drip. Birds are singing, flowers are blooming, and while most look for love, your primary goal is to find a good decongestant. While your friends talk of vacation plans, you long for antihistamines. At this rate, you’ll be the first in your crowd to attend spring break in a face mask.

Although spring is a beautiful time of year, its also the time that plants release pollen, and millions start to sneeze and sniffle. If those millions include you, here are some things you might want to know about controlling spring allergies.

Woman and child sneezing

Pollen
When it comes to springtime allergy triggers, pollens takes first place. Trees, weeds, and grasses release tiny grain of the stuff into the air, and when they get into the nose of someone who suffers from allergies, the body’s immune system gets out of control.

The body’s natural defense system sees pollen as hazardous and releases antibodies to attack it. This triggers the release of histamines into the blood. Histamines are the chemicals are the causes of the itchy eyes, runny noses, and other common allergy symptoms.

Pollen count is highest on breezy days, when the wind carries the allergens through the air, whilst rain tends to wash them away, lowering the count.

Symptoms
Watering and itching eyes, runny nose, sneezing, coughing, and dark circles around the eyes are all common indicators of allergies.

Allergy Treatments
Although there is no cure for allergies, there are medicines that can ease the symptoms.

Antihistamines work to decrease sneezing, itching, and sniffling by reducing the amount of histamine in the body.

Woman scratching skin

Decongestants shrink blood vessels in the nasal cavities to relieve swelling and congestion.

Nasal spray decongestants work on clogged nasal passageways to relieve congestion faster than oral decongestants, without many of the side effects.

Steroid Nasal sprays are a preferred treatment, but only three, Flonase, Rhinocort, and Nasacort, are available over the counter.

Eye drops can be helpful in the relief of itchy, watery eyes.

Even though many allergy remedies are available over the counter, you may want to consider consulting a doctor to make sure you choose the right one. He may be able to recommend allergy shots, prescription medication, immunotherapy tablets, or steroid nasal sprays. Be aware that some antihistamines can make you feel drowsy.

Natural Allergy Relief
If you prefer your allergy relief organic, here are some options:

Butterbar is an herb which has shown allergy relief potential. Some studies show an extract called Ze 3339 to work as well as antihistamines when it comes to allergy relief.

Woman holding head

Quercitin has been shown in research to prevent the release of histamines. It is found in apples, onions, and black tea.

Nasal Irrigation Involves a a quarter teaspoon each of salt and baking soda combined with sterile or boiled water to clear sinus passages. A squeeze bottle or neti pot can be used for nasal irrigation.

Tips For Keeping Pollen Contact Low

  • Stay indoors when pollen count is high, usually in the morning.
  • Keep windows and doors closed in the spring. An air purifier may come in handy.
  • Keep air filters in your home clean and make sure bookshelves and vents are free of pollen.
  • Wash your hair after venturing outdoors.
  • Vacuum twice weekly, wearing a mask to avoid the kick up of pollen, dust, and mold trapped in your carpet.

Let us know how you deal with the high spring pollen count! Good luck and a great symptom free spring!

Beauty Products and Eye Infection

So here’s a really “great” video game to give your little girls for Christmas! The game is called “Car Make-Up” and the object is for girls to “do the unthinkable- apply makeup while driving!” The game then instructs the player to, “Click on each of the makeup options and try to get ready within the allotted time the car is driving,” and then warns, “The car will occasionally bump the side of the road and hit a hazard, so watch out. The more you avoid the hazards, the higher your points will be.”

woman putting on eye liner
Really? Has it come to this? While our little boys engage in virtual warfare, our little girls risk life and limb to apply makeup? Among the multitudes of dangers involved in applying makeup in a moving vehicle, perhaps getting cosmetics in your eye is the least of all worries, but it can be a pretty big deal. Let’s check it out.

Eye Problems Associated with Makeup

Scratched Cornea
Damage to the cornea is one of the most serious consequences of makeup application. It is most likely to occur when using eyeliner or mascara. The most common injury is corneal abrasion, which has the potential to lead to serious infection.

Allergic Reactions
Always check makeup labels to make sure you have no known allergies to the ingredients. Allergic reactions include irritation, infection, and redness If you develop any of these problems, your best bet would be to find a new product.

Woman with conjunctivitis
Conjunctivitis
More commonly referred to as pink eye, conjunctivitis can be a result of bacteria from your makeup entering your eye. Although most makeup products contain preservatives to prevent this from happening, expired or insecurely sealed makeup may be bacteria-friendly.

What Can You Do?

Don’t Share Your Makeup
No matter how much your girlfriends drool over your new glitter shadow, tell them to keep their hands to themselves and get their own! And don’t be applying it on your better half either. Sharing makeup is an easy way for bacteria to transfer.

Keep Your Liner Outside Your lash Line!
No matter how many YouTube tutorials you see with girls dragging down their inner and upper lids to apply liner, it will never be a smart thing to do! Besides, professionals will agree that while large quantities of black liner looks dramatic, it actually makes eyes look smaller. You don’t need more places to put eyeliner on your eyes, and especially no if it scratches your eye or eyelids.

Replace Makeup Every Three to Four Months 
Expired products lose their ability to fight bacteria. If your mascara is starting to clump, it is probably time to replace, and, who wants clumpy mascara anyway? Also, if you do have the misfortune of getting an eye infection, you’re best advised to replace any products you used while infected to stop the spread of bacteria, as difficult as this may be.

Never Do Your Makeup in Your Car!
This may be right up there with texting when it comes to distracted driving and is also a very likely way to a scratched cornea or eye irritation. Keep your eyes on the road, your hands on the wheel, and put the makeup on your face before you get in the car.

Remember, no matter how beautiful your eyes look with makeup, irritated and infected eyes are never a good look! Fell free to write in and tell us about your experiences with makeup and eye infections.