Tag Archives: Acne Prone Skin

Spinach for Healthy Skin

It’s not easy being green. So how is it that spinach carries it off with such aplomb? Sure, spinach has had its defenders over the years, Popeye topping the list, not to mention culinary greats who used the green leafy vegetable to create such dishes as spinach soufflé, spinach lasagna, and countless versions of spinach salad. But, considering its unappetizing appearance, you could say spinach has done very well for itself. Besides being hailed for its high antioxidant and nutrient content, spinach is also receiving props for its ability to help maintain healthy skin. Here’s how you can use spinach to keep your skin smooth and radiant.

Bowl of green spinach

Nutritional Value
Spinach contains the antioxidant beta-carotene, which aids skin repair and slows cancer cells.

  • Vitamin A: One cup of cooked spinach contains 943 mcg of this vitamin, which is 105% of the daily recommended allowance, RDA, for men and 135% of the RDA for adult females.
  • Vitamin C: This antioxidant is crucial for skin cell repair and growth. Because vitamin C is not stored in the body, it must be provided by your daily diet. A cup of cooled spinach will give adult men 17.6 mg or 20% of the RDA of vitamin C, while it will give women 23%.
  • Iron: Iron is a component of hemoglobin, which is a protein found in red blood cells responsible for supplying oxygen to the tissues. You can find 6.5 mg of iron in a cup of cooked spinach which is equivalent to 81% of the RDA for men, and 36% of the RDA for women.
  • Magnesium: One cup of cooked spinach will provide you with 157mg magnesium, approximately 49% of the RDA for adult females and 37% for adult males. Magnesium is known for its ability to heal wounds and infections on the skin.

For Acne
Spinach can be used as a face mask or in juice from to help acne-prone skin. To make the mask, blend spinach and mix with water. Apply it to your face and let sit for about twenty minutes before rinsing. While making the juice requires a bit more effort, it is often the preferred method of obtaining the full benefits of the vegetable. Mix a half tomato with one carrot, one celery, a quarter of a cucumber, held a cup of cabbage, one green onion, half a red pepper, and a handful of spinach. Blend a drink daily.

Spinach juice

Anti-Aging
Spinach is a goldmine of antioxidants. Antioxidants are crucial for destroying damaging free radicals which cause premature aging. The regular consumption of this leafy green will help to slow down skin degeneration and make skin radiant.

Additionally, spinach has a high water content. One cup of cooked spinach provides 5 ounces of water to keep skin cells hydrated and is crucial to cell function. Spinach also contains iron and vitamin C to boost collagen synthesis. Collagen is a protein required for muscle and skin elasticity.

Skin Repair
The vitamin A in spinach helps to keep skin toned and smooth, while the vitamin C helps to rejuvenate skin cells. These vitamins, along with iron, also support collagen levels essential for skin repair.

Improves Complexion
Folate and vitamin K are both found in spinach and can reduce the prevalence of dry skin, acne, and stretch marks, minimizing bruising and dark circles. The high vitamin content in the leafy green can also relieve itchy, dry skin, leaving you a radiant complexion.

Mixed spinach

Experts recommend eating cooked spinach as opposed to raw for better nutrition digestion. Cooking spinach also eliminates the effects of oxalic acid, which interferes with the body’s absorption of calcium. Liquid forms of spinach are especially effective when combined with other vegetables.

Spinach Face Mask
To get the benefits of spinach for your skin, try this natural recipe:

Mix five or six fresh spinach leaves with 1 tablespoon of raw honey ( manuka honey is recommended.) Add two tablespoons of lemon juice. Dilute with water is your skin is sensitive to lemon. The mixture will be sticky. Apply mask to clean face. Let it sit for 20 minutes. Rinse and pat dry. Repeat for smooth skin tone.

Do you eat your spinach right down to the finish? If so, let us know how your skin is doing! We love to hear from you!

The Best Oils for Your Skin Type

Essential oil

Even though oils have been used for centuries as skincare, it’s only been in the last few years that oils have become super mainstream and widely available. If you’ve been hesitant to try oils in the past, or if you’ve tried an oil and been less than impressed with the results, this post is for you. As with any other skincare product, different facial oils suit different skin types and our guide below helps you to find the oils that are best suited for your specific skin type.

Acne-Prone
While acne-prone skin often is oily, this isn’t always the case. You may have sensitive or dry skin and still experience acne. Putting oil on a face suffering from breakouts may seem a bit scary, but there are oils available that will soothe and help reduce your breakouts. One of the determining factors in whether or not an oil will benefit acne-prone skin is the ratio of oleic acid and linoleic acid. Oleic acid is a monounsaturated fat, or omega-9 fatty acid while linoleic acid is unsaturated fat, or omega-6 fatty acid. An abstract for a study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology states, “acne patients have also been shown to have low levels of linoleic acid in their skin surface lipids.” Sebum produced by your oil glands is largely oleic acid, so using an oil high in linoleic acid helps balance your skin. Oils that work best for acne-prone skin include hemp seed oil, rosehip seed oil, grape seed oil, evening primrose oil and safflower oil.

Hemp seed oil.

Oily Skin
Putting oil on oily skin seems like a bad idea, but as you learned above, the sebum from your pores is completely different than plant oils. When people have oily skin, the tendency is to use harsh products like exfoliators and toners with alcohol, because at first these seem to remove oil from the skin. The problem with using these types of products is that you are damaging your skin’s lipid barrier, which works to keep good things like moisture in and harmful pollutants out. When you damage the lipid barrier, your skin senses it is imbalanced and it needs more moisture, and it will attempt to moisturize itself by producing more sebum. So, the harsher products can actually not only be ineffective, but they do the exact opposite of what you’re looking for them to do. Pure plant oils help to repair and maintain the lipid barrier of your skin. Oils that tend to work well for oily skin are hemp oil, rosehip seed oil, evening primrose oil, jojoba oil and avocado oil.

Dry Skin
When it comes to dry skin you want an oil that will really penetrate and add moisture to your skin. Oils like rosehip seed and hemp seed oil are relatively dry oils and they may be a bit too drying for skin that is naturally dry. Dry skin needs oils that have a good blend of omega fatty acids including omega-3, omega-6 and omega-9 fatty acids. If you have dry skin you also need an oil that is going to hydrate your face for hours at a time and that will help your skin to retain moisture. Oils that benefit dry skin include aloe vera oil, argan oil, olive oil, grape seed oil and vitamin E oil.

Aloe vera oil.

Normal and Combination Skin
Combination skin commonly features an oily T-zone area and dry skin elsewhere on the face and oils are particularly great for combination skin because they help balance your skin. Normal skin is generally fairly balanced on its own, so your facial oil will be more for hydration than about making sure that everything is evened out on your skin. Oils that work really well for normal and combination skin are grape seed oil, tamanu oil, carrot seed oil and aloe vera oil.

The idea of oil on your face may still scare you, but if you find the right oil, you will never look back when it comes to moisturizing your skin. Oils are available at a wide variety of price points, but it is worth noting that sometimes you do get what you pay for. When choosing your facial oil, you want to be sure that it is as natural and organic as possible, which usually means looking for an oil that is unrefined and cold-pressed. Oils that are refined are less pure and are more likely to include undesirable additives. Next time you’re looking for a moisturizer, reference this guide to find the oil that will work best for you.

Top Ingredients for Acne Prone Skin

Woman examining acne

It’s a common misconception that acne prone skin is synonymous with oily skin. While oily skin definitely is more prone to breakouts than dry or normal skin, not all people with oily skin experience acne. Similarly, it is entirely possible to have dry, sensitive skin that is prone to acne. Acne is something that nobody wants to experience and it can be difficult to get rid of due to the vast amount of factors that can be causes of acne. To help you heal your skin and boost your confidence, Vine Vera did a bit of digging and located the top three ingredients that those with acne prone skin should look for in skincare products.

Niacinamide.

Niacinamide
Niacinamide is a derivative of vitamin B3. Niacinamide is a cell-communicating ingredient that provides several skin benefits. Skin care experts state that “[a]ssuming skin is being protected from sun exposure, niacinamide can improve the skin’s elasticity, dramatically enhance its barrier function, help erase discolorations and revive skin’s healthy tone and texture.” Recently, niacinamide has begun to make a name for itself in the fight against acne. It increases fatty acid levels in your skin, stimulates micro-circulation in your skin and treats uneven, acne-ridden complexion due to it’s anti-inflammatory properties. Not only does niacinamide help fight acne, it can also reduce hyperpigmentation caused by acne and it also provides anti-aging benefits.

Sulfur
Sulfur can be super helpful for acne prone skin, but it is one of the more unpleasant ways to treat acne. The first drawback of sulfur is without a doubt the smell. If you have never smelled sulfur, just imagine rotten eggs and you’ve got the idea of what sulfur smells like. The second drawback is that it can be irritating to skin, though it depends entirely upon formulation and frequency of use. Sulfur is a mineral that decreases excess oil production by your glands and that fights inflammation while also exfoliating the skin. The good news is that many skin care products combine sulfur with other ingredients that help to lessen or mask the scent, making it far more pleasant to use. A spot treatment with sulfur is a an effective way to zap zits.

Salicylic acid.

Salicylic Acid
One of the most prevalent ingredient in skin care products designed for acne prone skin, salicylic acid is a form of beta hydroxy acid (BHA). The reason this is frequently used in the treatment of acne prone skin is that it effectively exfoliates your skin, removing dead skin cells and other debris that rests on the surface of your skin and inside your pores. Additionally, salicylic acid is available in large range of products, meaning that there are formulations for oily skin and skin that is dry. A 1 to 2% liquid or gel exfoliant is one of the best ways to deliver the acne fighting power of salicylic acid. While these are safe enough to use every day (and multiple times a day), it’s best to start slowly and increase a tolerance to avoid any unnecessary irritation.

Acne prone skin can be embarrassing and uncomfortable, but using the right products helps reduce breakouts. Antioxidants are also important ingredients to look for in products for acne prone skin as they prevent further free radical damage and soothe skin. A regular skincare routine with high quality products and formulations can mitigate problems for those with acne prone skin.