Omega 3 Rich Foods’ Skin Effects

Apparently Jennifer Anniston is not only beautiful, but smart, and she’s not only smart, she’s smart about being beautiful. Anyone interested in Jen’s eating habits will know that Jen is a firm believer an omega-3, fish oil rich diet. That’s because Jennifer Anniston knows how important omega-3 is for your skin. If you need more proof than Jenn’s face to convince you to put more Omega-3 in your diet, let’s talk about how it affects your skin and how you can get more of it.

fish oil omega 3 capsules woman taking omega-3 pill
What are Omega-3 Fatty Acids?
Also known as polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), omega-3 fatty acids are essential fatty acids that the body cannot make by itself, and must be acquired through food. They are crucial for brain function, growth and development and also decrease the risk of heart disease. They are also good for the skin.

How Do They Work?
When we age, cells become thinner and less elastic. The barrier function of the skin is decreased and moisture is allowed to leave the skin causing it to become dry. In addition to this, the number of epidermal cells decreases as well, and the skin is not able to repair itself as efficiently. At the same time, structural elements which support the skin begin to weaken. All of these factors promote wrinkling.

Omega -3 fatty acids enforce the skin cell membrane. The skin cell membrane is the outermost layer of the skin cell and is responsible for monitoring the entrance and exit of nutrients and waste products, admitting them to the skin cell or disposing of them. The skin cell membrane also affects the ability of the cell to stay hydrated. If the skin cell can hold on to water, skin will be more moist and softer, which may prevent or even eradicate wrinkles.

Omega-3s and Sun Damage
Research demonstrates that omega-3 fatty acids can decrease skin damage from ultraviolet light and limit the production of cancer cells caused by UV light. Omega-3s also have anti-inflammatory properties which can heal wounds and treat psoriasis, acne, and atopic dermatitis.

Where Can We Get Them?
The most common food sources of Omega-3s are fish like mackerel and salmon, krill, algae and some plant and nut oils. Omega-3 derived from fish oils are not often featured in topical facial creams due to their undesirable fishy small and the presence of impurities, such as mercury, but facial creams are currently being developed with omega-3 from plants and algae.

If this isn’t enough inspiration for you to incorporate Omega-3 into your diet, just look at Jenni Anni’s face. Tell us how you get your Omega-3s. We love to hear it.

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